Novelist Quotes

Quotes tagged as "novelist" Showing 61-90 of 140
Roman Payne
“I was forced to wander, having no one, forced by my nature to keep wandering because wandering was the only thing that I believed in, and the only thing that believed in me.”
Roman Payne

Richelle E. Goodrich
“Every exceptional writer holds a Master of Arts in Daydreaming.”
Richelle E. Goodrich

Kamand Kojouri
“I've written you sixty-seven love poems.
Here’s another one for you.
But really, for me.
These poems are the candles that I light
with the fire you have ignited in me.
I place this candle here and another there
so even if the stars have argued with the moon
and are sulking away in a corner,
you can still find your way to me.
Sixty-eight poems now. What
does the future hold for us?
Joy? Disappointment? Gentle caresses? And subtle neglect?
I hope the good is more than the bad. Much more.
For what is the point of love
if by lighting these candles
our own flame loses its brightness?
I know the good is more than the bad.
Much more.
I cannot wait to write you sixty-nine.”
Kamand Kojouri

P. Anastasia
“Sometimes I don't even know why I'm writing what I'm writing...
I'm just following these people around and taking notes.”
P. Anastasia

Kamand Kojouri
“A poetess is not as selfish
as you assume.
After months of agonising
over her marriage of words—the bride—
and spaces—the groom,
she knows that as soon
as she has penned the poem,
it’s yours to consume.
So, without giving it a think,
she blows on the ink
and the letters fly away
like dandelions on a windy day,
landing on hands and lips,
on hearts and hips.
But more often than not,
you can easily spot
them trodden and forgotten,
becoming sodden and rotten.
Yet, she will continue to make
what’s others to take
because selfishness
is not the mark of a poetess.”
Kamand Kojouri

Flannery O'Connor
“The novelist is required to create the illusion of a whole world with believable people in it, and the chief difference between the novelist who is an orthodox Christian and the novelist who is merely a naturalist is that the Christian novelist lives in a larger universe. He believes that the natural world contains the supernatural. And this doesn't mean that his obligation to portray the natural is less; it means it is greater.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Dorothy L. Sayers
“Persons curious in chronology may, if they like, work out from what they already know of the Wimsey family that the action of the book takes place in 1935; but if they do, they must not be querulously indignant because the King's Jubilee is not mentioned, or because I have arranged the weather and the moon's changes to suit my own fancy. For, however realistic the background, the novelist's only native country is Cloud-Cuckooland, where they do but jest, poison in jest: no offence in the world.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night

Roman Payne
“Passionate attraction to someone of the opposite sex will make a hero or a fool of a novelist each time.”
Roman Payne, The Love of Europa: Limited Time Edition

Flannery O'Connor
“I think the writer is initially set going by literature more than by life. When there are many writers all employing the same idiom, all looking out on more or less the same social scene, the individual writer will have to be more than ever careful that he isn't just doing badly what has already been done to completion. The presence alone of Faulkner in our midst makes a great difference in what the writer can and cannot permit himself to do. Nobody wants his mule and wagon stalled on the same track the Dixie Limited is roaring down.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Kamand Kojouri
“If you write then you are reborn because by writing about the moment, you can relive it for a second time.”
Kamand Kojouri

Kamand Kojouri
“She was in awe of all his work. 'How do you do it?" she asked.
He smiled and said, 'By loving you.”
Kamand Kojouri

Will Self
“I gain nothing but pleasure from writing fiction; short stories are foreplay, novellas are heavy petting – but novels are the full monte. Frankly, if I didn't enjoy writing novels I wouldn't do it – the world hardly needs any more and I can think of numerous more useful things someone with my skills could be engaged in. As it is, the immersion in parallel but believable worlds satisfies all my demands for vicarious experience, voyeurism and philosophic calithenics. I even enjoy the mechanics of writing, the dull timpani of the typewriter keys, the making of notes – many notes – and most seducttive of all: the buying of stationery. That the transmogrification of my beautiful thoughts into a grossly imperfect prose is always the end result doesn't faze me: all novels are only a version- there is no Platonic ideal. But I'd go further still: fiction is my way of thinking about and relating to the world; if I don't write I'm not engaged in any praxis, and lose all purchase.”
Will Self

Pat Conroy
“Moonrise is a fabulous novel and my damn wife wrote it and that’s me up there near Highlands shouting it out to the hills.”
Pat Conroy, A Lowcountry Heart: Reflections on a Writing Life

Rawi Hage
“Fiction is overrated, Fly. We’ve discussed this. In the time it takes those novelist fuckers to contemplate a few poetic passages, a thousand kids die from malnutrition. Immediacy, man, that’s what counts.”
Rawi Hage, Carnival

Kamand Kojouri
“These poems are cups
that I pour my life into.
Here,
Drink!”
Kamand Kojouri

Martin Amis
“Novelists don't normally write about what's going on; they write about what's not going on.”
Martin Amis, The Second Plane: 14 Responses to September 11

Stephen King
“I'm not asking you to come reverently or unquestioningly; I'm not asking you to be politically correct or cast aside your sense of humor (please God you have one). This isn't a popularity contest, it's not the moral Olympics, and it's not church. But it's Writing, damn it, not washing the car or putting on eyeliner. If you can take it seriously, we can do business. If you can't or won't, it's time for you to close the book and do something else. Wash the car, maybe.”
Stephen King

Catherine Townsend-Lyon
“An authors publication date never matters, a book not read yet will always be New"...”
Author Catherine Lyon a

Flannery O'Connor
“There is one myth about writers that I have always felt was particularly pernicious and untruthful—the myth of the "lonely writer," the myth that writing is a lonely occupation, involving much suffering because, supposedly, the writer exists in a state of sensitivity which cuts him off, or raises him above, or casts him below the community around him. This is a common cliché, a hangover probably from the romantic period and the idea of the artist as a Sufferer and a Rebel.

Probably any of the arts that are not performed in a chorus-line are going to come in for a certain amount of romanticizing, but it seems to me particularly bad to do this to writers and especially fiction writers, because fiction writers engage in the homeliest, and most concrete, and most unromanticizable of all arts. I suppose there have been enough genuinely lonely suffering novelists to make this seem a reasonable myth, but there is every reason to suppose that such cases are the result of less admirable qualities in these writers, qualities which have nothing to do with the vocation of writing itself.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Flannery O'Connor
“I'll call any length of fiction a story, whether it be a novel or a shorter piece, and I'll call anything a story in which specific characters and events influence each other to form a meaningful narrative. I find that most people know what a story is until they sit down to write one. Then they find themselves writing a sketch with an essay woven through it, or an essay with a sketch woven through it, or an editorial with a character in it, or a case history with a moral, or some other mongrel thing. When they realize that they aren't writing stories, they decide that the remedy for this is to learn something that they refer to as "the technique of the short story" or "the technique of the novel." Technique in the minds of many is something rigid, something like a formula that you impose on the material; but in the best stories it is something organic, something that grows out of the material, and this being the case, it is different for every story of any account that has ever been written.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Graham Greene
“So much of a novelist’s writing … takes place in the unconscious: in those depths the last word is written before the word appears on paper. We remember the details of our story, we do not invent them.”
Graham Greene

Jeff Lyons
“With the right tools, you can write anything ...”
Jeff Lyons, Anatomy of a Premise Line: How to Master Premise and Story Development for Writing Success

Angelica Hopes
“Film and novel characters are often stereotyped, but racial stereotyping in many novels or films creates & encourages labelling, discrimination & racism. ~Angelica Hopes”
Angelica Hopes

Jeff Lyons
“Try everything; listen to everyone. Follow no one. You are your own story guru!”
Jeff Lyons, Anatomy of a Premise Line: How to Master Premise and Story Development for Writing Success

Michael Kroft
“Novelist: A person who has more than a dozen novels in the works and thinks it would be novel to finish one.”
Michael Kroft

Laurie Perez
“Bringing a novel to light - revealing the form and cadence, shadows and demeanor of a protagonist constructed from thin air - linking scenes and synchronicity across translucent time - holding up a glass brimming with chilled, never-tasted liquid, then sipping from it with intoxicated focus - allowing lovers to make a perilous mess of things, fall apart and nakedly come back together again - looking through conjured windows deep into someone else’s snow-bound solitude, feeling utterly alone yet being all-connected: this is not writing. It’s world-creating.

It’s raw, exposed dreaming. It’s humbling. At first too personal and intimate to share, it evolves like a child into a life of its own until I have no say in what comes next.

It’s what I wake at 4am to say Yes to, the spinning possibility of a new story relentlessly commanding me to write it down so it can whirl in your experience.”
Laurie Perez

Paul Theroux
“Really there was no deadlier combination than bookworm and megalomaniac. It was, for example, the crazed condition of many novelists and travelers.”
Paul Theroux, Dark Star Safari: Overland from Cairo to Cape Town

Michael Kroft
“You write once and you can call yourself a writer, but it takes three novels before you can call yourself a novelist. The first two could have just been lucky. One day, I will finish my third, and one day, I will be a novelist.”
Michael Kroft

Louise Doughty
“Read. Read as if your life depended on it because your life as a novelist does.”
Louise Doughty

M.T. Bass
“While victors may get to write history, novelists get to write/right reality.”
M.T. Bass