New England Wisdom Quotes

Quotes tagged as "new-england-wisdom" Showing 1-5 of 5
Robert Frost
“Half the world is composed of people who have something to say and can't, and the other half who have nothing to say and keep on saying it.”
Robert Frost

Robert Frost
“Being the boss anywhere is lonely. Being a female boss in a world of mostly men is especially so.”
Robert Frost

“The important point of this report [Montague, Massachusetts; July 7, 1774] may be summed up in six resolutions: 1. We approve of the plan for a Continental Congress September 1, at Philadelphia. 2. We urge the disuse of India teas and British goods. 3. We will act for the suppression of pedlers and petty chapmen (supposably vendors of dutiable wares). 4. And work to promote American manufacturing. 5. We ought to relieve Boston. 6. We appoint the 14th day of July, a day of humiliation and prayer.”
Edward Pearson Pressey, History of Montague; A Typical Puritan Town

“New Englanders began the Revolution not to institute reforms and changes in the order of things, but to save the institutions and customs that already had become old and venerable with them; and were new only to a few stupid Englishmen a hundred and fifty years behind the times.”
Edward Pearson Pressey, History of Montague; A Typical Puritan Town

Louise Dickinson Rich
“In spite of all that is said, and more especially written, about the crabbed New Englander, New Englanders, like all ordinary people, are nice. Their manner of proffering a favor is sometimes on the crusty side, but that is much more often diffidence than surliness.”
Louise Dickinson Rich, We Took to the Woods