Mental Hospital Quotes

Quotes tagged as "mental-hospital" (showing 1-20 of 20)
Ruby Wax
“It's an unfortunate word, 'depression', because the illness has nothing to do with feeling sad, sadness is on the human palette. Depression is a whole other beast. It's when your old personality has left town and been replaced by a block of cement with black tar oozing through your veins and mind. This is when you can't decide whether to get a manicure or jump off a cliff. It's all the same. When I was institutionalised I sat on a chair unable to move for three months, frozen in fear. To take a shower was inconceivable. What made it tolerable was while I was inside, I found my tribe - my people. They understood and unlike those who don't suffer, never get bored of you asking if it will ever go away? They can talk medication all hours, day and night; heaven to my ears.”
Ruby Wax

Michael Thomas Ford
“He said that I have to remember that even though I've changed a lot in here, I'm going back to a world that hasn't changed”
Michael Thomas Ford, Suicide Notes

John Kennedy Toole
“Jail was preferable. There they only limited you physically. In a mental ward they tampered with your soul and worldview and mind.”
John Kennedy Toole

S.E. Hinton
“It goes so fast, he thought, they don't tell you that, how fast it goes...”
S.E. Hinton, Hawkes Harbor

Erving Goffman
“Here I want to stress that perception of losing one’s mind is based on culturally derived and socially ingrained stereotypes as to the significance of symptoms such as hearing voices, losing temporal and spatial orientation, and sensing that one is being followed, and that many of the most spectacular and convincing of these symptoms in some instances psychiatrically signify merely a temporary emotional upset in a stressful situation, however terrifying to the person at the time. Similarly, the anxiety consequent upon this perception of oneself, and the strategies devised to reduce this anxiety, are not a product of abnormal psychology, but would be exhibited by any person socialized into our culture who came to conceive of himself as someone losing his mind.”
Erving Goffman, Asylums: Essays on the Social Situation of Mental Patients and Other Inmates

Jonathan Harnisch
“I have schizophrenia. I am not schizophrenia. I am not my mental illness. My illness is a part of me.”
Jonathan Harnisch, Jonathan Harnisch: An Alibiography

Emily Andrews
“My mother's mouth drops. 'Emmy...don't say those things Emmy. Remember, we don't talk about those things.'

'Yes Mom. I remember. That's why I'm here, looking like this.'

An orderly knocks on the door and announces that visiting time is over.

My mother and I look at each other awkwardly, and hug.

'I love you,' she says.

'I love you too, Mom.'

'You aren't telling them too much are you?' she asks, afraid.

I sign. 'No Mommy, I'm not.'

She's visibly relieved. She leaves the room.

The orderley comes back and escorts me back into the main room.

I just sit and laugh to myself."

(after Emmy's suicide attempt) ~ The Finer Points of Becoming Machine”
Emily Andrews

Criss Jami
“One either cares what others think about him, or cares what others think he thinks about them. If you want to find someone who doesn't care in the slightest what anyone thinks, try a lunatic asylum.”
Criss Jami, Healology

Eric Nuzum
“Right there in that room, listening to the tape Laura gave me, I decided that I wanted something more than what I’d allowed myself to become. Listening to the voices and piano notes fade in and out, I decided that I wanted to be happy. If I had to fight for things in life, I wanted to fight for something bigger than the right to eat with a fork. I wanted to love and be loved and feel alive. I had no idea how to find my way, but listening to that music wash over me, I felt, for the first time, that the struggle I faced would be worth it.”
Eric Nuzum, Giving Up the Ghost: A Story About Friendship, 80s Rock, a Lost Scrap of Paper, and What It Means to Be Haunted

Rebecca McNutt
“…I love you,” he said to her, although at that point he was certain she could no longer comprehend the words. “I’d trade places with you in an instant, Mandy Valems… you never deserved this… why would anyone do something so terrible!?” A cold chill froze his heart when he saw her empty eyes again.

The fluorescent lights in the dim room sparked to life all of a sudden, brightness so sharp that it startled him. In a flash, sharp and sudden, quicker than a lightning strike, the bulbs flickered and exploded with a few jingling pops.”
Rebecca McNutt, Mandy and Alecto: The Collected Smog City Book Series

Eric Nuzum
“Eventually I had gotten it together enough to call her. I did so partly to let her know where I was and partly to almost brag about where I was. Whenever I’d get morose, sulky, or stuck somewhere between crabby and suicidal, she was quick to say something disarming or indirectly tell me things weren’t that bad. Laura wasn’t exactly dismissive of my feelings, but I often left our conversations feeling like she didn’t quite get how harsh things felt for me—or at least that she wasn’t willing to acknowledge it. This frustrated and upset me. I spent so much time trying to hide the depths of my feelings and the clusterfuckedness of my life from everyone, except her. The one person I was honest with was often telling me that I was being too dramatic, or overdramatic, or overthinking things, or would I just please change the subject. It wasn’t like she didn’t believe me—it was more like she questioned why I let things bother me so much. In a small way, ending up in the mental ward was a strange kind of validation for me. Being in Timken Mercy proved that when I was insisting that things were terrible, and she kept insisting that they weren’t, they were, in fact, kind of terrible.”
Eric Nuzum, Giving Up the Ghost: A Story About Friendship, 80s Rock, a Lost Scrap of Paper, and What It Means to Be Haunted

Frank X. Barron
“On the ward there was hurt and pain so big and so deep that speech could not express it. I had been interested in philosophy, and suddenly philosophy came alive for me, for here the basic questions of human existence were not abstractions: they were embodied in human suffering”
Frank X. Barron, Unusual Associates: A Festschrift for Frank Barron

S.E. Hinton
“He'll have to do without me, Jamie thought, not looking back. And then clearly, as if he'd been told, he knew Grenville /could/ do without him. There was somewhere else he had to go now, somewhere else he had to be.”
S.E. Hinton, Hawkes Harbor

Mike Bartos
“The old joke is that psychiatrists are doctors who can't stand the sight of blood. Maybe they can't stand it, but if they work where I work, they damn well better get used to it.
At least surgeons and prizefighters get to wear gloves”
Mike Bartos, BASH

“His first thought – what felt like his first thought ever, it formed so slowly in his brain – was that she looked like a doll. Just like a doll. Her eyes were large and bright and feline; her hair
was chestnut, brushed to a hardwood shine, parted sharply and flowing to her thighs; her lips were cupid’s-bow-cute; her head was tilted to one side on a long, long neck. She had skin that had never seen sunlight, and wore no expression at all.

He noticed her. And she noticed, and kept on noticing, him.

Stanley looked down for a third and longer time. It wasn’t polite to stare. Not at girls. Or anyone. But especially not girls. Not even girls who looked like perfect porcelain dolls.”
Amelia Mangan, Release

Jessica Shirvington
“For now, you will be confined to your room until you earn privileges.'

'Privileges?'

He nodded. 'Once we start working together and you show a willingness to cooperate, we can add privileges to your daily program. Outside time, personal items, television, phone--those kinds of things.'

He checked his watch while I stared at him in horror. Privileges? As in out-frickin'-side time? I was in prison!”
Jessica Shirvington, Between the Lives

Rebecca McNutt
“I wish I could run away,” Rudger told Jersey as they both rushed in and out of various patients’ rooms, darting around like little ants. “I can’t leave and be on my own though, not right now, anyway.”

“Why?” asked Jersey, waving her flashlight in mid-air.

Rudger froze for a second, a regretful haze emanating from his eyes. “It’d break her heart if I left.”

“Ain’t that normal? For parents to have mixed feelings about their kids growin’ up?”

“Not for me, it isn’t.”

Jersey made a pitying face in his direction. “So, you wanna keep bein’ towed around with your mom, livin’ in a gross town like Danvers?”

“Is there a choice?”

“Yeah, there sure is. You can run away and try to be a whole person before it’s too late, or you can live with mommy dearest forever and turn into Norman Bates.”
Rebecca McNutt, Danvers: The Reckoning

“Ogarnęło go poczucie beznadziejności - beznadziejności oswojonej i ciepłej, przez co jeszcze bardziej beznadziejnej. Zatrzymał się przy oknie. Ścieżka ginęła w jesiennym dywanie opadłych liści i w mroku: była tak blisko i zarazem tak daleko, jak Paryż, jak Byt, jak Wolność. Wyrzekł się tych prostych życiowych ścieżek częściowo z własnej woli, częściowo wbrew niej. Natura była abstraktem, snem. Rzeczywistość natomiast zamykała się tutaj, między korytarzykiem, pielęgniarzem i salą.”
Ihar Babkov, Adam Kłakocki i jego cienie

“Emma cites the structure of the [Eating Disorder] Unit as being important to her decision to disengage from her illness, and the fact that she felt safe in it, and cared for.
'It was the first time I'd been in an environment where I felt comfortabe with all the people around me. I felt "I can be here and I can talk to anybody" and that was something that had been missing from my life'.”
Carol Lee, To Die For