Quotes About Matrimony

Quotes tagged as "matrimony" (showing 1-30 of 87)
Coco Chanel
“It’s probably not just by chance that I’m alone. It would be very hard for a man to live with me, unless he’s terribly strong. And if he’s stronger than I, I’m the one who can’t live with him. … I’m neither smart nor stupid, but I don’t think I’m a run-of-the-mill person. I’ve been in business without being a businesswoman, I’ve loved without being a woman made only for love. The two men I’ve loved, I think, will remember me, on earth or in heaven, because men always remember a woman who caused them concern and uneasiness. I’ve done my best, in regard to people and to life, without precepts, but with a taste for justice.”
Coco Chanel

Martha Gellhorn
“I know enough to know that no woman should ever marry a man who hated his mother.”
Martha Gellhorn, Selected Letters

Jane Austen
“Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection.”
Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

Thomas Hardy
“People go on marrying because they can't resist natural forces, although many of them may know perfectly well that they are possibly buying a month's pleasure with a life's discomfort.”
Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure

Greta Garbo
“There are some who want to get married and others who don't. I have never had an impulse to go to the altar. I am a difficult person to lead.”
Greta Garbo, Greta and Cecil

P.G. Wodehouse
“Marriage is not a process for prolonging the life of love, sir. It merely mummifies its corpse.”
P.G. Wodehouse, The Small Bachelor

Elizabeth Peters
“I disapprove of matrimony as a matter of principle.... Why should any independent, intelligent female choose to subject herself to the whims and tyrannies of a husband? I assure you, I have yet to meet a man as sensible as myself! (Amelia Peabody)”
Elizabeth Peters, Crocodile on the Sandbank

Clint Eastwood
“They say all marriages are made in heaven, but so are thunder and lightning.”
Clint Eastwood

Elizabeth I
“If I follow the inclination of my nature, it is this: beggar-woman and single, far rather than queen and married.”
Elizabeth I, Collected Works

Charles Dickens
“There can be no disparity in marriage like unsuitability of mind and purpose.”
Charles Dickens, David Copperfield

Dorothy L. Sayers
“The rule seemed to be that a great woman must either die unwed ... or find a still greater man to marry her. ... The great man, on the other hand, could marry where he liked, not being restricted to great women; indeed, it was often found sweet and commendable in him to choose a woman of no sort of greatness at all.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night

Charlotte Brontë
“There are certain phrases potent to make my blood boil -- improper influence! What old woman's cackle is that?"

"Are you a young lady?"

"I am a thousand times better: I am an honest woman, and as such I will be treated.”
Charlotte Brontë, Shirley

Simone de Beauvoir
“To catch a husband is an art; to hold him is a job.”
Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex

Michel de Montaigne
“[Marriage] happens as with cages: the birds without despair to get in, and those within despair of getting out.”
Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays

Charlotte Brontë
“[O]ur honeymoon will shine our life long: its beams will only fade over your grave or mine.”
Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

William Shakespeare
“LEONATO
Well, niece, I hope to see you one day fitted with a husband.

BEATRICE
Not till God make men of some other metal than earth. Would it not grieve a woman to be overmastered with a pierce of valiant dust? to make an account of her life to a clod of wayward marl? No, uncle, I'll none: Adam's sons are my brethren; and, truly, I hold it a sin to match in my kindred.”
William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

Dorothy L. Sayers
“A marriage of two independent and equally irritable intelligences seems to me reckless to the point of insanity.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Gaudy Night

William Shakespeare
“LEONATO
Well, then, go you into hell?

BEATRICE
No, but to the gate; and there will the devil meet me, like an old cuckold, with horns on his head, and say 'Get you to heaven, Beatrice, get you to heaven; here's no place for you maids:' so deliver I up my apes, and away to Saint Peter for the heavens; he shows me where the bachelors sit, and there live we as merry as the day is long.”
William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

Charlotte Brontë
“Your god, sir, is the World. In my eyes, you, too, if not an infidel, are an idolater. I conceive that you ignorantly worship: in all things you appear to me too superstitious. Sir, your god, your great Bel, your fish-tailed Dagon, rises before me as a demon. You, and such as you, have raised him to a throne, put on him a crown, given him a sceptre. Behold how hideously he governs! See him busied at the work he likes best -- making marriages. He binds the young to the old, the strong to the imbecile. He stretches out the arm of Mezentius and fetters the dead to the living. In his realm there is hatred -- secret hatred: there is disgust -- unspoken disgust: there is treachery -- family treachery: there is vice -- deep, deadly, domestic vice. In his dominions, children grow unloving between parents who have never loved: infants are nursed on deception from their very birth: they are reared in an atmosphere corrupt with lies ... All that surrounds him hastens to decay: all declines and degenerates under his sceptre. Your god is a masked Death.”
Charlotte Brontë, Shirley

Charlotte Brontë
“I am anchored on a resolve you cannot shake. My heart, my conscience shall dispose of my hand -- they only. Know this at last.”
Charlotte Brontë, Shirley

Charles Dickens
“It was all Mrs. Bumble. She would do it," urged Mr. Bumble; first looking round, to ascertain that his partner had left the room.

That is no excuse," returned Mr. Brownlow. "You were present on the occasion of the destruction of these trinkets, and, indeed, are the more guilty of the two, in the eye of the law; for the law supposes that your wife acts under your direction."

If the law supposes that," said Mr. Bumble, squeezing his hat emphatically in both hands, "the law is a ass — a idiot. If that's the eye of the law, the law is a bachelor; and the worst I wish the law is, that his eye may be opened by experience — by experience.”
Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist

Jane Austen
“And such is your definition of matrimony and dancing. Taken in that light, certainly their resemblance is not striking; but I think I could place them in such a view. You will allow that in both man has the advantage of choice, woman only the power of refusal; that in both it is an engagement between man and woman, formed for the advantage of each; and that when once entered into, they belong exclusively to each other till the moment of its dissolution; that it is their duty each to endeavor to give the other no cause for wishing that he or she had bestowed themselves elsewhere, and their best interest to keep their own imaginations from wandering towards the perfections of their neighbors, or fancying that they should have been better off with any one else.”
Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

Christine de Pizan
“How many women are there ... who because of their husbands' harshness spend their weary lives in the bond of marriage in greater suffering than if they were slaves among the Saracens?”
Christine de Pizan, The Book of the City of Ladies

Héloïse d'Argenteuil
“[I]t is not by being richer or more powerful that a man becomes better; one is a matter of fortune, the other of virtue. Nor should she deem herself other than venal who weds a rich man rather than a poor, and desires more things in her husband than himself. Assuredly, whomsoever this concupiscence leads into marriage deserves payment rather than affection.”
Héloïse d'Argenteuil, The Letters of Abélard and Héloïse

Dorothy L. Sayers
“My husband would do anything for me ...' It's degrading. No human being ought to have such power over another."

"It's a very real power, Harriet."

"Then ... we won't use it. If we disagree, we'll fight it out like gentlemen. We won't stand for matrimonial blackmail.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Busman's Honeymoon

William Shakespeare
“Yes, faith; it is my cousin's duty to make curtsy and say 'Father, as it please you.' But yet for all that, cousin, let him be a handsome fellow, or else make another curtsy and say 'Father, as it please me.”
William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

Elizabeth I
“[I]n the end this shall be for me sufficient, that a marble stone shall declare that a Queen, having reigned such a time, lived and died a virgin.”
Elizabeth I, Collected Works

Thomas Hardy
“--the ethereal, fine-nerved, sensitive girl, quite unfitted by temperament and instinct to fulfil the conditions of the matrimonial relation with Phillotson, possibly with scarce any man...”
Thomas Hardy, Jude the Obscure

Dorothy L. Sayers
“Philip wasn't the sort of man to make a friend of a woman. He wanted devotion. I gave him that. I did, you know. But I couldn't stand being made a fool of. I couldn;t stand being put on probation, like an office-boy, to see if I was good enough to be condescended to. I quite thought he was honest when he said he didn't believe in marriage -- and then it turned out that it was a test, to see whether my devotion was abject enough. Well, it wasn't. I didn't like having matrimony offered as a bad-conduct prize.”
Dorothy L. Sayers, Strong Poison

William Shakespeare
“Wooing, wedding, and repenting is as a Scotch jig, a measure, and a cinque-pace: the first suit is hot and hasty like a Scotch jig--and full as fantastical; the wedding, mannerly modest, as a measure, full of state and ancientry; and then comes repentance and with his bad legs falls into the cinque-pace faster and faster, till he sink into his grave.”
William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

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