Mary Shelley Quotes

Quotes tagged as "mary-shelley" Showing 1-30 of 40
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“I do know that for the sympathy of one living being, I would make peace with all. I have love in me the likes of which you can scarcely imagine and rage the likes of which you would not believe. If I cannot satisfy the one, I will indulge the other.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“There is something at work in my soul, which I do not understand.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“I looked upon the sea, it was to be my grave”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Jeanette Winterson
“I discover that grief means living with someone who is no longer there.”
Jeanette Winterson, Frankissstein: A Love Story

Catherine Lowell
“More than anything, I began to hate women writers. Frances Burney, Jane Austen, Elizabeth Browning, Mary Shelley, George Eliot, Virginia Woolf. Bronte, Bronte, and Bronte. I began to resent Emily, Anne, and Charlotte—my old friends—with a terrifying passion. They were not only talented; they were brave, a trait I admired more than anything but couldn't seem to possess. The world that raised these women hadn't allowed them to write, yet they had spun fiery novels in spite of all the odds. Meanwhile, I was failing with all the odds tipped in my favor. Here I was, living out Virginia Woolf's wildest feminist fantasy. I was in a room of my own. The world was no longer saying, "Write? What's the good of your writing?" but was instead saying "Write if you choose; it makes no difference to me.”
Catherine Lowell, The Madwoman Upstairs

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“With an anxiety that almost amounted to agony, I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay at my feet. It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs.”
Mary Shelley (Frankenstein)

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“Oh! What a miserable night I passed! The cold stars shone in mockery, and the bare trees waved their branches above me; now and then the sweet voice of a bird burst forth amidst the universal stillness. All, save I, were at rest or in enjoyment; I, like the arch-fiend, bore a hell within me, and finding myself unsympathized with, wished to tear up the trees, spread havoc and destruction around me, and then to have sat down and enjoyed the ruin.”
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“Although I may not be yours, I can never be another’s.”
Mary Shelley

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“Remember that I have power; you believe yourself miserable, but I can make you so wretched that the light of day will be hateful to you. You are my creator, but I am your master--obey!”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein: The 1818 Text

Kiersten White
“Mary Shelley changed the whole world.”
Kiersten White, The Dark Descent of Elizabeth Frankenstein

Lita Judge
“Science gives us the ability to pull back the skin of life
and reveal the truth of things. It allows us to understand
the mysteries of mountain-making and falling stars.

But knowledge isn't meant to be held as a weapon
in a battle to defy our fates and manipulate life over death.

Evil lodges too easily in men's hearts.
What will happen if they assume the power to create life?”
Lita Judge, Mary's Monster: Love, Madness, and How Mary Shelley Created Frankenstein

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“From you only could I hope for succour, although towards you I felt no sentiment but that of hatred. Unfeeling, heartless creator! You had endowed me with perceptions and passions and then cast me abroad an object for the scorn and horror of mankind.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“Nuestras almas están formadas de muy extraña manera y nuestras vidas penden solo de leves lazos, cuya rotura puede arrojarlas a la prosperidad o la ruina.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein: The 1818 Text

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“If such lovely creatures were miserable, it was less strange that I, an imperfect and solitary being. should be wretched.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

William Ospina
“Mary, la hija, pasó la infancia viendo su nombre escrito sobre ua tumba. Una madre desconocida - que llevaba su mismo nombre- había muerto al darla a luz, y eso la llevó a cavilar la vida entera sobre los misterios del naiemiento, y sobre la asombrosa proximidad que hay entre la vida y la muerte. Se sentía parida por la tumba, una tumba ella misma, y su nombre y su epitafio tallados sobre una piedra gris la persiguieron en la luz y en la sombra.”
William Ospina, El año del verano que nunca llegó

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“¿ Era el hombre, efectivamente, tan poderoso, tan virtuoso y magnífico, y no obstante tan depravado y tan bajo? Unas veces parecía un mero vástago del principio del mal; otras,lo más noble y divino que cabe imaginar.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Jordan Stratford
“Your mum wrote that girls can do whatever," Ada continued. "Education. Profession."
Mary, now fully engaged, put down her book.
"My dear Ada, my mother wrote about how things ought to be, not how they are."
Ada continued looking displeased, which made Mary go on. "Of course, how are things to be the way they ought, unless we make them so?”
Jordan Stratford, The Case of the Missing Moonstone

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“I do not know,' said the man, 'what the custom of the English may be; but it is the custom of the Irish to hate villains.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein: The 1818 Text

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“He [Shelley] told me that he had had many visions lately; he had seen the figure of himself, which met him as he walked on the terrace and said to him, 'How long do you mean to be content?”
Mary Shelley

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“My present situation was one in which all voluntary thought was swallowed up and lost.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein: The 1818 Text

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“I was myself when young, but that wears out in a very short time.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein:

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“But my enthusiasm was checked by my anxiety, and I appeared rather like one doomed by slavery to toil in the mines, or any other unwholesome trade than an artist occupied by his favorite employment.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“Aprecio la vida, aunque sólo sea una sucesión de angustias, y la defenderé.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“Pero ¿Dónde estaban mis amigos y familiares? No había tenido un padre que cuidase de mi infancia, ni una madre que me bendijese con sus sonrisas y caricias; y si los tuve, toda mi vida pasada no era sino tiniebla, un ciego vacío que no distinguía nada. Desde el principio de mis recuerdos, había sido como era entonces en estatura y proporción. Hasta ahora, nunca había visto a un ser que se pareciese a mí ni pretendiese contacto alguno conmigo. ¿ Qué era yo? La pregunta me surgía una y otra vez, sólo para contestarla con gemidos”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“Nada hay más doloroso para el espíritu humano, tras la excitación que provoca la rápida sucesión de los acontecimientos, como esa calma mortal de apatía y certidumbre que la sigue, y priva al alma de toda esperanza y temor.”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein

Linda Bailey
“Can you miss someone you've never known?

Mary does.”
Linda Bailey, Mary, Who Wrote Frankenstein

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“I seemed to have lost all soul or sensation but for this one pursuit”
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein: The 1818 Text

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“I busied myself to think of a story, —a story to rival those which had excited us to this task. One which would speak to the mysterious fears of our nature, and awaken thrilling horror—one to make the reader dread to look round, to curdle the blood, and quicken the beatings of the heart.”
Mary Shelley

“Our husbands decide without asking our consent, or having our concurrence; for, to tell you the truth, I hate this boat, though I say nothing." Mary Shelley to Jane Williams, talking the boat that Shelley and his friend Williams bought.”
Ivan Roe, Shelley: The Last Phase

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
“Letter II

To Mrs. Saville, England.

Archangel, 28th March, 17—.

How slowly the time passes here, encompassed as I am by frost and snow! Yet a second step is taken towards my enterprise. I have hired a vessel and am occupied in collecting my sailors; those whom I have already engaged appear to be men on whom I can depend and are certainly possessed of dauntless courage.

But I have one want which I have never yet been able to satisfy, and the absence of the object of which I now feel as a most severe evil, I have no friend, Margaret: when I am glowing with the enthusiasm of success, there will be none to participate my joy; if I am assailed by disappointment, no one will endeavour to sustain me in dejection. I shall commit my thoughts to paper, it is true; but that is a poor medium for the communication of feeling. I desire the company of a man who could sympathise with me, whose eyes would reply to mine. You may deem me romantic, my dear sister, but I bitterly feel the want of a friend. I have no one near me, gentle yet courageous, possessed of a cultivated as well as of a capacious mind, whose tastes are like my own, to approve or amend my plans. How would such a friend repair the faults of your poor brother! I am too ardent in execution and too impatient of difficulties. But it is a still greater evil to me that I am self-educated: for the first fourteen years of my life I ran wild on a common and read nothing but our Uncle Thomas' books of voyages. At that age I became acquainted with the celebrated poets of our own country; but it was only when it had ceased to be in my power to derive its most important benefits from such a conviction that I perceived the necessity of becoming acquainted with more languages than that of my native country. Now I am twenty-eight and am in reality more illiterate than many schoolboys of fifteen. It is true that I have thought more and that my daydreams are more extended and magnificent, but they want (as the painters call it) keeping; and I greatly need a friend who would have sense enough not to despise me as romantic, and affection enough for me to endeavour to regulate my mind.”
Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein

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