Marie Antoinette Quotes

Quotes tagged as "marie-antoinette" Showing 1-30 of 32
Marie Antoinette
“But how will I eat cake if my head is over there, and my hands are over here?”
Marie Antoinette

Kathryn Lasky
“Dreams weigh nothing. - Marie Antoinette”
Kathryn Lasky, Marie Antoinette: Princess of Versailles, Austria - France, 1769

“It was like the first time I visited Versailles. There was an eerieness, like I'd been there before. I don't know if I was Louis XIV or Marie Antoinette or a lowly groundskeeper, but I lived there.”
Maurice Minnifield

Antonia Fraser
“As the Dauphine stepped out of her carriage on to the ceremonial carpet that had been laid down, it was the Duc de Choiseul who was given the privilege of the first salute. Presented with the Duc by Prince Starhemberg, Marie Antoinette exclaimed: 'I shall never forget that you are responsible for my happiness!”
Antonia Fraser, Marie Antoinette: The Journey

Kathryn Lasky
“No one really does know how to have fun here at all. It is all etiquette.”
Kathryn Lasky

Kathryn Lasky
“Our lives are just spectacles. We are like dolls, in a sense, to be observed and played with - often with cruel and deceitful intentions - in an unreal world.”
Kathryn Lasky

Peter Abrahams
“Ingrid shrugged...like Marie Antoinette hearing about the starving peasants.”
Peter Abrahams, Down the Rabbit Hole

Nell Scovell
“If Larry David were living in 18th century France and heard the peasants had no bread, his response "Let them eat cake" would have made people laugh. But when Marie Antoinette said it, they chopped off her head.”
Nell Scovell, Just the Funny Parts: ... And a Few Hard Truths About Sneaking Into the Hollywood Boys' Club

“The places that once knew [Marie Antoinette] now know her forever.”
Grace Greenwood

Kathryn Lasky
“She told them simply and directly that the meadow was a place of peace and beauty, where indeed if one came to it in a quiet manner, the animals would not be disturbed; for there are lovely birds, and squirrels and field mice, and sometimes deer.”
Kathryn Lasky

Kris Waldherr
“The truth is that, in times of turmoil, people look for a scapegoat to sacrifice. Marie Antoinette just happened to be the French Revolution's favorite It girl. To be fair, Marie Antoinette lived in a world which she was expected to obey her husband as if he were God,, to spill forth children as if she were Eve--- and then accept that aristocrats ate cake while peasants had no bread. After all, it was divine will and all that.”
Kris Waldherr, Doomed Queens

Meghan Masterson
“There must be no repercussions to this,” says Marie Antoinette. Her quiet voice slides through the room like the whisper of a steel blade.”
Meghan Masterson, The Wardrobe Mistress: A Novel of Marie Antoinette

Antonia Fraser
“Kings who become prisoners are not far from death.”
Antonia Fraser, Marie Antoinette: The Journey

Kathryn Lasky
“We dug the asparagus, and tonight Aunt Charlotte cooked it for me herself with butter and melted cheese. I ate a whole plateful and drank half the brown jug of sweet milk. Then I had two slices of the thick coarse-grain bread that Aunt and the nuns make fresh every day.”
Kathryn Lasky

Kathryn Lasky
“What is bred in the bone will come out in the flesh.”
Kathryn Lasky

Kris Waldherr
“First things first: Marie Antoinette never said, 'Let them eat cake.' Those words were attributed to an earlier French Queen, Marie-Therese, the wife of the Sun King Louis XIV. By 1767---a year in which Marie Antoinette was still an innocent German-speaking twelve-year-old in Austria....”
Kris Waldherr, Doomed Queens

Leslie Carroll
“Motherhood had been metamorphosing Marie Antoinette into a more grounded and responsible woman. Her pregnancies had necessitated several months' absence from her usual round of gay amusements and she discovered that it was more fun to spend time with her children than it had been to play faro deep into the wee hours of the morning.
But her reputation as a frivolous, extravagant ninny and the marital issues in the royal bed had already demonized her in the eyes of the people at all levels of society.”
Leslie Carroll, Notorious Royal Marriages: A Juicy Journey Through Nine Centuries of Dynasty, Destiny, and Desire

Diana Abu-Jaber
“This morning's pastry poses challenges. To assemble the tiny mosaic disks of chocolate flake and candied ginger, Avis must execute a number of discrete, ritualistic steps: scraping the chocolate with a fine grater, rolling the dough cylinder in large-grain sanding sugar, and assembling the ingredients atop each hand-cut disk of dough in a pointillist collage. Her husband wavers near the counter, watching. "They're like something Marie Antoinette would wear around her neck. When she still had one."
"I thought she was more interested in cake," Avis says, she tilts her narrow shoulders, veers around him to stack dishes in the sink.”
Diana Abu-Jaber, Birds of Paradise

Brian Spellman
“You can't have your cake and eat it too. Let them eat croissants.”
Brian Spellman

Hilary Mantel
“Rouge, also, had a peculiar function as caste-mark. It was applied with a heavy hand and in a circular pattern. It was worn most lavishly on the day of a woman’s debut, when she was obliged to simulate the flush of the contrived orgasm bestowed by royal favour.”
Hilary Mantel

“It is in misfortune that you realize your true nature.”
Antonia Fraser quoting Marie Antoinette

Antonia Fraser
“Looking without passion is always a good plan where history is concerned. But is it really possible with regard to the career and character of Marie Antoinette?”
Antonia Fraser, Marie Antoinette: The Journey

M.B. Dallocchio
“How often do the poor in the US get to stand in front of their nation's Marie Antoinette's and shove the stale, mass-produced cake of lower class reality back into their mouths?”
M.B. Dallocchio

Stefan Zweig
“Tutto a te mi guida - Totul ma duce spre tine - cuvinte mai adevarate ca oricand, in acele zile cand Maria Antoaneta se afla la un pas de moarte. Fersen stia ca inima ei a batut pentru dansul pana in ultima clipa. Cu cele cinci cuvinte - ultim salut de despartire in pragul vesniciei, dar si juramant al dragostei statornice in curgerea vremelniciei pamantene - s-a incheiat aceasta incomparabila tragedie in umbra ghilotinei.”
Stefan Zweig, Marie Antoinette: The Portrait of an Average Woman

Michelle Moran
“No Hapsburg princesse could legitimize a woman of unguarded morals. If du Barry had possessed any sense, she would have seen that she was the mistress of the past while Antoinette was the princesse of the future.”
Michelle Moran, Madame Tussaud: A Novel of the French Revolution

Gina Barreca
“When the Apocalypse comes, you'll find me pushing Marie Antoinette out of the way and saying, 'Let me eat cake! Forget them; I want the cake! Two helpings! I have some friends with me! Is there coffee with the cake, Marie? I'm just asking.”
Gina Barreca, "If You Lean In, Will Men Just Look Down Your Blouse?": Questions and Thoughts for Loud, Smart Women in Turbulent Times

Stefan Zweig
“Le parece maravilloso verse envuelta por la ardiente muchedumbre, dejarse amar por ese desconocido pueblo; en adelante sigue disfrutando de este amor de veinte millones de criaturas como de un derecho propio, sin sospechar que el derecho impone también deberes y que el amor mas puro acaba por fatigarse si no se siente correspondido.”
Stefan Zweig, Marie Antoinette: The Portrait of an Average Woman

Stefan Zweig
“Erst im Unglück weiß man wahrhaft, wer man ist.”
Stefan Zweig, Marie Antoinette: The Portrait of an Average Woman

Antonia Fraser
“What was happening was a maniacal assault on the inhabitants of the Paris prisons, with some of the royal family’s most beloved attendants still incarcerated in the La Force. These included the Marquise de Tourzel and Pauline-and that hate figure so often in obscene popular publications, the lesbian paramour of the “Infamous Antoinette”, the Princesse de Lamballe.”
Antonia Fraser, Marie Antoinette: The Journey

Samantha Verant
“Grab one of the gorgeous Baccarat crystal glasses you bought me for Christmas last year, Sophie," said Walter. "Didn't your grandmother tell you it's the only way champagne should be served?"
Robert smirked and pointed to the buffet. "We certainly don't drink Dom straight from the bottle."
"Yeah, yeah, yeah," I said. "How crass of me."
I meandered over to grab a glass- a coupe de champagne, the oldest design, preceding flute and tulip glasses. Legend had it that the bowl of glass was modeled after the breast of Marie Antoinette.”
Samantha Verant, The Secret French Recipes of Sophie Valroux

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