Machiavelli Quotes

Quotes tagged as "machiavelli" Showing 1-30 of 38
Niccolò Machiavelli
“When evening comes, I return home and go into my study. On the threshold I strip off my muddy, sweaty, workday clothes, and put on the robes of court and palace, and in this graver dress I enter the antique courts of the ancients and am welcomed by them, and there I taste the food that alone is mine, and for which I was born. And there I make bold to speak to them and ask the motives of their actions, and they, in their humanity, reply to me. And for the space of four hours I forget the world, remember no vexation, fear poverty no more, tremble no more at death: I pass indeed into their world.”
Niccolo Machiavelli

Paulo Coelho
“A Warrior knows that the ends do not justify the means. Because there are no ends, there are only means...”
Paulo Coelho, Warrior of the Light

Niccolò Machiavelli
“From this arises the following question: whether it is better to be loved than feared, or the reverse. The answer is that one would like to be both the one and the other, but because they are difficult to combine, it is far better to be loved than feared if you cannot be both.”
Machiavelli

Niccolò Machiavelli
“Without an opportunity, their abilities would have been wasted, and without their abilities, the opportunity would have arisen in vain.”
Machiavelli Niccolo

Niccolò Machiavelli
“..it happens in all human affairs that we never seek to escape one mischief without falling into another. Prudence therefore consists in knowing how to distinguish degrees of disadvantage, and in accepting a less evil as a good.”
Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince

Niccolò Machiavelli
“In general you must either pamper people or destroy them; harm them just a little and they’ll hit back; harm them seriously and they won’t be able to. So if you’re going to do people harm, make sure you needn’t worry about their reaction.”
Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince

Niccolò Machiavelli
“Therefore a wise prince ought to adopt such a course that his citizens will always in every sort and kind of circumstance have need of the state and of him, and then he will always find them faithful.”
Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince

Niccolò Machiavelli
“It is a common fault of men not to reckon on storms in fair weather.”
Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince

Niccolò Machiavelli
“These opportunities, then, gave these men the chance they needed, and their great abilities made them recognize it.”
Machiavelli Niccolo

Michel Foucault
“Finally, this principle and its corollary lead to a conclusion, deduced as an imperative: that the objective of the exercise of power is to reinforce, strengthen and protect the principality, but with this last understood to mean not the objective ensemble of its subjects and territory, but rather the prince's relation with what he owns, with the territory he has inherited or acquired, and with his subjects.”
Michel Foucault, The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality

Niccolò Machiavelli
“Injuries, therefore, should be inflicted all at once, that their ill savour being less lasting may the less offend; whereas, benefits should be conferred little by little, that so they may be more fully relished.”
Niccolò Machiavelli, The Prince

Rutger Bregman
Rousseau already observed that this form of government is more accurately an ‘elective aristocracy’ because in practice the people are not in power at all. Instead we’re allowed to decide who holds power over us. It’s also important to realise this model was originally designed to exclude society’s rank and file. Take the American Constitution: historians agree it ‘was intrinsically an aristocratic document designed to check the democratic tendencies of the period’. It was never the American Founding Fathers’ intention for the general populace to play an active role in politics. Even now, though any citizen can run for public office, it’s tough to win an election without access to an aristocratic network of donors and lobbyists. It’s not surprising that American ‘democracy’ exhibits dynastic tendencies—think of the Kennedys, the Clintons, the Bushes.

Time and again we hope for better leaders, but all too often those hopes are dashed. The reason, says Professor Keltner, is that power causes people to lose the kindness and modesty that got them elected, or they never possessed those sterling qualities in the first place. In a hierarchically organised society, the Machiavellis are one step ahead. They have the ultimate secret weapon to defeat their competition.

They’re shameless.”
Rutger Bregman, De meeste mensen deugen

Niccolò Machiavelli
“Those who believe that where great personages are concerned new favors cause old injuries to be forgotten deceive themselves.”
Machiavelli Niccolo

Wendy Doniger
“Kautilya makes Machiavelli look like Mother Teresa”
Wendy Doniger, The Hindus: An Alternative History

Bangambiki Habyarimana
“I thought there was no use for me in reading Sun Tzu and Machiavelli because I am neither a warrior nor a politician, but it turned out to be useful when I married”
Bangambiki Habyarimana, The Great Pearl of Wisdom

Niccolò Machiavelli
“Do you are laugh because you are successful or because another one is unfortunate?”
Machiavelli, Niccolò

Ashwin Sanghi
“It’s foolish to call Chanakya an Indian Machiavelli. Rather, Machiavelli was possibly an Italian Chanakya.”
Ashwin Sanghi

Martijn Benders
“When one would ask most modern artists, poets, writers and other status quo fueled semi-intellectuals who Machiavelli was - was that an opera singer?”
Martijn Benders

Lisa Kleypas
“Swift returned her scowl with an implacable glance. "Never do an enemy a small injury."
"Only you would quote Machiavelli during lawn bowling," Daisy said through gritted teeth.”
Lisa Kleypas, Scandal in Spring

Lisa Kleypas
“I say," Llandrindon remarked, "your performance at bowls is exceptional, Miss Bowman. I've never seen a beginner do so well. How o you manage to deliver it perfectly every time?"
"Where the willingness is great, the difficulties cannot be," she replied, and saw the line of Swift's cheek tighten with a sudden grin as he recognized the Machiavelli quote.”
Lisa Kleypas, Scandal in Spring

Lisa Kleypas
“I say," Llandrindon remarked, "your performance at bowls is exceptional, Miss Bowman. I've never seen a beginner do so well. How do you manage to deliver it perfectly every time?"
"Where the willingness is great, the difficulties cannot be," she replied, and saw the line of Swift's cheek tighten with a sudden grin as he recognized the Machiavelli quote.”
Lisa Kleypas, Scandal in Spring

“Not that quoting Machiavelli doesn't make you crazy hot, but it's also the normal kind of crazy.”
Lily Anderson

“Do not talk of rights, else
politics would start
Scales would come out,
haggling would start”
Vineet Raj Kapoor

Niccolò Machiavelli
“In the end it will be necessary, if he wants to maintain a name for liberality, to burden the people extraordinarily, to be rigorous with taxes, and to do all those things that can be done to get money. This will begin to make him hated by his subjects, and little esteemed by anyone as he becomes poor; so having offended the many and rewarded the few with this liberality of his, he feels every least hardship and runs into risk at every slight danger. When he recognizes this, and wants to draw back from it, he immediately incurs the infamy of meanness.”
Niccolò Machiavelli

“I felt mischievous, clever, triumphant, sad—though perhaps the dominant emotion was really this last. I felt like a mildly melancholic Mrs Machiavelli, already ashamed of her duplicity.”
Stephen Benatar, Wish Her Safe at Home

John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton
“Machiavelli’s teaching would hardly have stood the test of Parliamentary government, for public discussion demands at least the profession of good faith. But it gave an immense impulse to absolutism by silencing the consciences of very religious kings, and made the good and the bad very much alike. Charles V. offered 5000 crowns for the murder of an enemy. Ferdinand I. and Ferdinand II., Henry III. and Louis XIII., each caused his most powerful subject to be treacherously despatched. Elizabeth and Mary Stuart tried to do the same to each other. The way was paved for absolute monarchy to triumph over the spirit and institutions of a better age, not by isolated acts of wickedness, but by a studied philosophy of crime and so thorough a perversion of the moral sense that the like of it had not been since the Stoics reformed the morality of paganism.”
John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, The History of Freedom and Other Essays

Anthony Hope
“For myself, I thank Heaven that I am well rid of this same troublesome passion of love that likens one man to a lion and another to a fox.”
Anthony Hope, The Chronicles of Count Antonio

“Up until that day, I had never really thought about why I defined success that way—instead, I’d been obsessed with how I would attain those things. That focus on the how instead of the why had really tripped me up. It had led me to make some very bad decisions and to experience some very unhappy times. When you follow the influence of mainstream culture—television, movies, magazines, and more—to elevate the goals of wealth, power, and recognition above all else, it becomes logical to take selfish or negative actions in order to attain them. After all, that kind of approach—playing the game, playing for keeps, as they say—is put forth as the way to achieve success and happiness. Machiavelli’s writings are often referenced to support this point of view—statements like “the ends justify the means”—but it should be noted that Machiavelli died alone and in exile.”
Alan Philips, The Age of Ideas: Unlock Your Creative Potential

Leo Strauss
“The problem inherent in the surface of things, and only in the surface of things, is the heart of things.”
Leo Strauss

Francis Bacon
“We are much beholden to Machiavelli and others, that write what men do, and not what they ought to do.”
Francis Bacon, The Advancement of Learning, Volume 2

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