Les Misérables Quotes

Quotes tagged as "les-misérables" (showing 1-30 of 51)
Victor Hugo
“Et puis, tenez, monsieur Marius,je crois que j'étais un peu amoureuse de vous.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“Brothers, he who dies here dies in the radiance of the future, and we are entering a tomb all flooded with the dawn.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“So long as there shall exist, by virtue of law and custom, decrees of damnation pronounced by society, artificially creating hells amid the civilization of earth, and adding the element of human fate to divine destiny; so long as the three great problems of the century—the degradation of man through pauperism, the corruption of woman through hunger, the crippling of children through lack of light—are unsolved; so long as social asphyxia is possible in any part of the world;—in other words, and with a still wider significance, so long as ignorance and poverty exist on earth, books of the nature of Les Misérables cannot fail to be of use. HAUTEVILLE HOUSE, 1862. [Translation by Isabel F. Hapgood]”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“For the rest, he was the same to all men, the fashionable world and the ordinary people. He judged nothing in haste, or without taking account of the cirumstances. He said, 'Let me see how the fault arose.”
Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“Oh! if the good hearts had the fat purses, how much better everything would go!”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“L'istinto di Cosette cercava un padre, come quello di Valjean cercava un figlio, e incontrarsi, per essi, significò trovarsi; nel momento misterioso in cui le loro mani s'incontrarono, si saldarono. Quando quelle due anime si scorsero, riconobbero di essere ciascuna quel che abbisognava all'altra e s'abbracciarono strettamente.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“Do not ask the name of the person who asks you for a bed for a night. He whose name is a burden to him needs shelter more than any one.”
Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“He was troubled; this brain, so limpid in its blindness, had lost its transparency; there was a cloud in this crystal.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“Let us show that, if the people abandon the republicans, the republicans do not abandon the people.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“In the chaos of sentiments and passions which defend a barricade, there is something of everything; there is bravery, youth, honor, enthusiasm, the ideal, conviction, the eager fury of the gamester, and above all, intervals of hope.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“You always have everything better than the rest, even pain.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“Cosette, by learning that she was beautiful, lost the grace of not knowing it; an exquisite grace, for beauty heightened by artlessness is ineffable, and nothing is so adorable as dazzling innocence, going on her way, and holding in her hand, all unconsciousness, the key of a paradise.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“To die is nothing, but it is terrible not to live.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“A bird alone could have extricated himself from that place.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“He thought of that heroic Colonel Pontmercy . . . who had left upon every field of victory in Europe drops of that same blood which he, Marius, had in his veins, who had grown grey before his time in discipline and in command, who had lived with his sword-belt buckled, his epaulets falling on his breast, his cockade blackened by powder, his forehead wrinkled by the cap, in the barracks, in the camp, in the bivouac, in the ambulance, and who after twenty years had returned from the great wars with his cheek scarred, his face smiling, simple, tranquil, admirable, pure as a child, having done everything for France and nothing against her.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“The night was starless and very dark. Without doubt, in the gloom some mighty angel was standing, with outstretched wings, awaiting the soul.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“On n'a qu'à regarder certains hommes pour s'en défier, on les sent ténébreux à leurs deux extrémités. Ils sont inquiets derrière eux et menaçants devant eux. Il y a en eux de l'inconnu. On ne peut pas plus répondre de ce qu'ils ont fait que de ce qu'ils feront. L'ombre qu'ils ont dans le regard les dénonce. Rien qu'en les entendant dire un mot ou qu'en les voyant faire un geste on entrevoit de sombres secrets dans leur passé et de sombres mystères dans leur avenir.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, tome I/3

Victor Hugo
“Darks drifts covered the horizon. A strange shadow approaching nearer and nearer, was spreading little by little over men, over things, over ideas; a shadow which came from indignations and from systems. All that had been hurriedly stifled was stirring and fermenting. Sometimes the conscious of the honest man caught its breath, there was so much confusion in that air in which sophisms were mingled with truths. Minds trembled in the social anxiety like leaves at the approach of the storm. The electric tension was so great that at certain moments any chance-comer, thought unknown, flashed out. Then the twilight darkness fell again. At intervals, deep and sullen mutterings enabled men to judge of the amount of lightning in the cloud.”
Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“why comes there an hour when we leave this azure, and why does life continue afterwards?”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“It was like a hand which had opened and thrown suddenly upon her a handful of sunbeams.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“That you are happy, that Monsieur Pontmercy has Cosette, that youth espouses mourning, that there are about you, my children, lilacs and nightingales, that your life is a beautiful lawn in the sunshine, that all the enchantments of heaven fill your souls, and now, that I who am good for nothing, that I die; surely all this is well.”
Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“Oh, Vos, ¿quién sois? El Eclesiástico os llama Todopoderoso; los Macabeos os nombran
Creador; la Epístola a los Efesios os llama .Libertad; Baruch os nombra Inmensidad; los Salmos
os llaman Sabiduría y Verdad; Juan os llama Luz; los reyes os nombran Señor; el Éxodo os
apellida Providencia; el Levítico, Santidad; Esdras, Justicia; la creación osllama Dios; el hombre
os llama Padre; pero Salomón os llama Misericordia, y éste es el más bello de vuestros nombres.”
Víctor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“I believe I was a little bit in love with you”
Victor Hugo, Eponine

Victor Hugo
“Eponine and Azelma did not notice Cosette. To them she was like the dog. These three little girls could not count twenty-four years among them all, and they already represented all human society; on one side envy, on the other disdain.”
Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“Jean Valjean, my brother, you no longer belong to evil, but to good. It is your soul I am buying for you. I withdraw it from dark thoughts and from the spirit of perdition, and I give it to God!”
Victor Hugo

Victor Hugo
“During the years of suffering he reachd the conclusion that life was war in which he was one of the defeated. Hatred was his onlt weapon, and he resolved to sharpen it in prison and carry it with him when he left.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“Jean Valjean, mon frère, vous n'appartenez plus au mal, mais au bien. C'est votre âme que je vous achète; je la retire aux pensées noires et à l'esprit de perdition, et je la donne à Dieu.”
Victor Hugo Les Misérables

Victor Hugo
“Un jour il voyait des gens du pays très occupés à arracher des orties ; il regarda ce tas de plantes déracinées èt déjà desséchées, et dit : — C’est mort. Cela serait pourtant bon si l’on savait s’en servir. Quant l’ortie est jeune, la feuille est un légume excellent ; quand elle vieillit, elle a des filaments et des fibres comme le chanvre et le lin. La toile d’ortie vaut la toile de chanvre. Hachée, l’ortie est bonne pour la volaille ; broyée, elle est bonne pour lès bêtes à cornes, La graine de l’ortie mêlée au fourrage donne du luisant au poil des animaux ; la racine mêlée au sel produit une belle couleur jaune. C’est du reste un excellent foin qu’on peut faucher deux fois. Et que faut-il à l’ortie ? Peu de terre, nul soin, nulle culture. Seulement la graine tombe à mesure qu’elle mûrit, et est difficile à récolter. Avec quelque peine qu’on prendrait, l’ortie serait utile ; on la néglige, elle devient nuisible. Alors on la tue. Que d’hommes ressemblent à l’ortie ! — Il ajouta après un silence : Mes amis, retenez ceci, il n’y a ni mauvaises herbes ni mauvais hommes. Il n’y a que de mauvais cultivateurs.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, tome I/3

Victor Hugo
“Ce qui est certain, c'est que, d'ordinaire, après les vainqueurs viennent les voleurs. Mais mettons le soldat, surtout le soldat contemporain, hors de cause.”
Victor Hugo, Les Misérables, tome I/3

Victor Hugo
“Allez, philosophes, enseignez, éclairez, allumez, pensez haut, parlez haut, courez joyeux au grand soleil, fraternisez avec les places publiques, annoncez les bonnes nouvelles, prodiguez les alphabets, proclamez les droits, chantez les Marseillaises, semez les enthousiasmes, arrachez des branches vertes aux chênes. Faites de l'idée un tourbillon. Cette foule peut être sublimée. Sachons nous servir de ce vaste embrasement des principes et des vertus qui pétille, éclate et frissonne à de certaines heures. Ces pieds nus, ces bras nus, ces haillons, ces ignorances, ces abjections, ces ténèbres, peuvent être employés à la conquête de l'idéal. Regardez à travers le peuple et vous apercevrez la vérité. Ce vil sable que vous foulez aux pieds, qu'on le jette dans la fournaise, qu'il y fonde et qu'il y bouillonne, il deviendra cristal splendide, et c'est grâce à lui que Galilée et Newton découvriront les astres.”
Victor Hugo

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