Leonardo Da Vinci Quotes

Quotes tagged as "leonardo-da-vinci" Showing 1-30 of 36
Leonardo da Vinci
“The painter has the Universe in his mind and hands.”
Leonardo da Vinci

Shannon L. Alder
“Don’t say you don’t have enough time or enough money to change the world. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Gandhi, Michelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci and Jesus Christ.”
Shannon L. Alder

Walter Isaacson
“Vision without execution is hallucination. .. Skill without imagination is barren. Leonardo [da Vinci] knew how to marry observation and imagination, which made him history’s consummate innovator.”
Walter Isaacson, Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci
“Obstacles cannot crush me. Every obstacle yields to stern resolve. He who is fixed to a star does not change his mind.”
Leonardo da Vinci

James Morcan
“One of the best examples of a polymath is Leonardo da Vinci. Born in Italy in 1452, Leonardo was a sculptor, painter, architect, mathematician, musician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, botanist, geologist, cartographer and writer. Although he received an informal education that included geometry, Latin and mathematics, he was essentially an autodidact, or a self-taught individual.”
James Morcan, Genius Intelligence

Leonardo da Vinci
“Nothing should be so greatly feared as empty fame.”
Leonardo da Vinci, Thoughts on Art and Life

Norman Maclean
“...the most sublime of oddballs, Leonardo da Vinci”
Norman Maclean

Barbara Sher
“Let’s end the notion that ideas have no value unless they turn into a business or have some other practical use. Save them all in a beautiful book like Leonardo did. You might want to give them away someday, perhaps to someone who needs an idea. Or your great-great-grandchildren might love knowing what a fascinating mind you had. Or your biographer might be very happy after you’re gone.”
Barbara Sher, Refuse to Choose!: Use All of Your Interests, Passions, and Hobbies to Create the Life and Career of Your Dreams

Ross King
“That one of history’s greatest brains struggled with amo, amas, amat should be consolation to anyone who has ever tried to learn a second language.”
Ross King, Leonardo and the Last Supper

Ross King
“Let no one read my principles who is not a mathematician,” he famously declared (less famous is the fact that the principles he was referring to were his theories of how the aortic pulmonary valve worked). Ironically, he himself was a poor mathematician, often making simple mistakes. In one of his notes he counted up his growing library: “25 small books, 2 larger books, 16 still larger, 6 bound in vellum, 1 book with green chamois cover.” This reckoning (with its charmingly haphazard system of classification) adds up to fifty, but Leonardo reached a different sum: “Total: 48,” he confidently declared.”
Ross King, Leonardo and the Last Supper

“There is nothing in man or nature that does not ask questions.”
Curtis Bill Pepper, Leonardo: A Biographical Novel

Ross King
“At times Leonardo was troubled by his lack of achievement. As a young man he appears to have developed a reputation for melancholia. “Leonardo,” wrote a friend, “why so troubled?” A sad refrain runs through his notebooks: “Tell me if anything was ever done,” he often sighs. Or in another place: “Tell me if ever I did a thing.”
Ross King, Leonardo and the Last Supper

E.M. Forster
“She was like a woman of Leonardo Da Vinci's, whom we love not so much for herself as for the things that she will not tell us.”
E.M. Forster

“Another dream had been shattered.”
Henry S. Gillette, Leonardo da Vinci,: Pathfinder of science

Theresa Breslin
“This was not completely true. I had run so fast that I still had a stitch in my side, but I did not want to be left out of their confraternity of guilt.”
Theresa Breslin, The Medici Seal

Walter Pater
“Legions of grotesques sweep under his hand; for has not nature too her grotesques—the rent rock, the distorting lights of evening on lonely roads, the unveiled structure of man in the embryo, or the skeleton?”
Walter Pater, The Renaissance: Studies in Art and Poetry

Leonardo da Vinci
“A Life is Full of Danger”
Leonardo Davinci, The Notebooks of Leonardo Davinci

Alexandra Kleeman
“The structural similarity of men, and their ability to be represented both as ideal, like Leonardo's Vitruvian Man, and as average. Man being the measure of all things, and therefore a sort of standard and interchangeable unit of length, breadth, intelligence, emotion. We could lay them end to end to measure the distance between the continents, the distance to the moon. We could use them to calculate the weight of weather, or to buy things at the grocery. With such an abundance of men, we could gauge anything we chose.”
Alexandra Kleeman, Intimations: Stories

Leonardo da Vinci
“Tomaso of Florence. known as Masaccio, showed by his perfect works how those who took their nourishment from anything but nature, mistress of masters, were laboring in vain.”
Leonardo da Vinci

“When wine is drunk by a drunkard, that wine is revenged on the drinker.

Leonardo Da Vinci Notebooks, 1281”
Da Vinci Leonardo

Leonardo da Vinci
“For once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.”
Leonardo Da Vinci

Anna Del Conte
“Valtellina is the longest Alpine valley, stretching eastwards from the northern shores of Lake Como to the Stelvio peak, 3,500 m/11,500 ft high. This spectacular valley was loved by Leonardo da Vinci, who even mentioned the good osterie (inns) you can find along the route.”
Anna Del Conte, The Classic Food of Northern Italy

Leonardo da Vinci
“Perché la minestra si fredda.”
Leonardo da Vinci, Leonardo Da Vinci

Laura Chouette
“I think if someone would be in the Louvre
who looks just like the Mona Lisa - the people wouldn’t care about her -
because the only thing they admire is the soul captured in the painting
not the body that is mortal.”
Laura Chouette

Walter Isaacson
“A good painter has two chief objects to paint, man and the intention of his soul; the former is easy, the latter hard, because he has to represent it by the attitudes and movements of the limbs…The most important consideration in painting is that the movements of each figure expresses its mental state, such as desire, scorn, anger, pity, and the like. - quoted from Leonardo da Vinci's notebooks”
Walter Isaacson, Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo da Vinci
“Many have made a trade of delusions and false miracles, deceiving the stupid multitude.”

“Blinding ignorance does mislead us. O! Wretched mortals, open your eyes!”
Leonardo da Vinci

Laura Morelli
“I am a man of peace, but my father loves to argue, to blame to accuse.”
Laura Morelli, The Stolen Lady

Avijeet Das
“The "Monalisa Lisa" is an optical illusion created by Leonardo Da Vinci.

The woman in the painting "The Mona Lisa" doesn't appear to be always smiling.

When you look at the mouth you feel she looks sad, melancholic, and hostile. But when you look at the eyes you feel she is happy and cheerful.

Leonardo perfected the "sfumato technique," which translated literally from Italian means "vanished or evaporated." He created imperceptible transitions between light and shade, and sometimes between colors.

"Why the Silhouette?" appears as a simple story of a few individuals, but when you look at it from a distance, it appears to show you the philosophy of life.

I have tried to create imperceptible transitions between light and darkness and sometimes between colors.

Hope you see the illusion in "Why the Silhouette?”
Avijeet Das, Why the Silhouette?

Avijeet Das
“The "Mona Lisa" is an optical illusion created by Leonardo Da Vinci.

The woman in the painting "The Mona Lisa" doesn't appear to be always smiling.

When you look at the mouth you feel she looks sad, melancholic, and hostile. But when you look at the eyes you feel she is happy and cheerful.

Leonardo perfected the "sfumato technique," which translated literally from Italian means "vanished or evaporated." He created imperceptible transitions between light and shade, and sometimes between colors.

"Why the Silhouette?" appears as a simple story of a few individuals, but when you look at it from a distance, it appears to show you the philosophy of life.

I have tried to create imperceptible transitions between light and darkness and sometimes between colors.

Hope you see the illusion in "Why the Silhouette?”
Avijeet Das, Why the Silhouette?

Avijeet Das
“The "Mona Lisa" is an optical illusion created by Leonardo Da Vinci.

The woman in the painting "The Mona Lisa" doesn't appear to be always smiling.

When you look at her mouth you feel she looks sad, melancholic, and hostile. But when you look at her eyes you feel she is happy and cheerful.

Leonardo perfected the "sfumato technique," which translated literally from Italian means "vanished or evaporated." He created imperceptible transitions between light and shade, and sometimes between colors.

"Why the Silhouette?" appears as a simple story of a few individuals, but when you look at it from a distance, it appears to show you the philosophy of life.

I have tried to create imperceptible transitions between light and darkness and sometimes between colors.

Hope you see the illusion in "Why the Silhouette?”
Avijeet Das, Why the Silhouette?

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