Leaves Of Grass Quotes

Quotes tagged as "leaves-of-grass" Showing 1-16 of 16
Walt Whitman
“Camerado, I give you my hand!
I give you my love more precious than money,
I give you myself before preaching or law;
Will you give me yourself? will you come travel with me?
Shall we stick by each other as long as we live?”
Walt Whitman Leaves of Grass

Walt Whitman
“And I or you pocketless of a dime, may purchase the pick of the earth.”
Walt Whitman, Song of Myself

Walt Whitman
“I exist as I am, that is enough...”
Walt Whitman

Henry N. Beard
“I situate myself, and seat myself,
And where you recline I shall recline,
For every armchair belonging to you as good as belongs to me.

I loaf and curl up my tail
I yawn and loaf at my ease after rolling in the catnip patch."

(From Meow of Myself, from LEAVES OF CATNIP)”
Henry N. Beard, Poetry for Cats: The Definitive Anthology of Distinguished Feline Verse

Henry N. Beard
“Behold the day-break!
I awaken you by sitting on your chest and purring in your face,
I stir you with muscular paw-prods, I rouse you with toe-bites,
Walt, you have slept enough, why don't you get up?"

(From Meow of Myself, from LEAVES OF CATNIP)”
Henry N. Beard, Poetry for Cats: The Definitive Anthology of Distinguished Feline Verse

Henry N. Beard
“You can never know where I am or what I am,
But I am good company to you nonetheless,
And really do regret I broke your inkwell."

(From Meow of Myself, from LEAVES OF CATNIP)”
Henry N. Beard, Poetry for Cats: The Definitive Anthology of Distinguished Feline Verse

Walt Whitman
“Somehow I have been stunned. Stand back!
Give me a little time beyond my cuffed head and slumbers
and dreams and gaping,
I discover myself on the verge of the usual mistake.”
Walt Whitman

Henry N. Beard
“The noisy jay swoops by and reviles me, he complains of my meow and my malingering.

I too am not a bit subdued, I too am uncontrollable,
I sound my splenetic yowl over the roof of the house."

(From Meow of Myself, from LEAVES OF CATNIP)”
Henry N. Beard, Poetry for Cats: The Definitive Anthology of Distinguished Feline Verse

Walt Whitman
“The new rule shall rule as the soul rules, and as the love and justice and equality that are in the soul rule.”
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
He is a type of our best — our rarest. Electrical, I was going to say, beyond anyone, perhaps, ever was: charged, surcharged. Not a founder of new philosophies — not of that build. But a towering magnetic presence, filling the air about with light, warmth, inspiration. A great intellect, penetrating, in ways (on his field) the best of our time — to be long kept, cherished, passed on... It should not be surprising that I am drawn to Ingersoll, for he is 'Leaves of Grass.' He lives, embodies, the individuality I preach. 'Leaves of Grass' utters individuality, the most extreme, uncompromising. I see in Bob the noblest specimen —American-flavored—pure out of the soil, spreading, giving, demanding light.

{Whitman's thought on his good friend, the great Robert Ingersoll}”
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
“The spotted hawk swoops by and accuses me, he complains of my gab and my loitering. I too am not a bit tamed, I too am untranslatable, I sound my BARBARIC YAWP over the roofs of the world”
Whitman Walt

Walt Whitman
“I depart as air .... I shake my white locks at the runaway sun,
I effuse my flesh in eddies and drift it in lacy jags.
I bequeath myself to the dirt to grow from the grass I love,
If you want me again look for me under your bootsoles.”
Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass

Walt Whitman
“Welcome is every organ and attribute of me, and of any man hearty and clean,
Not an inch nor a particle of an inch is vile, and none shall be
less familiar than the rest.”
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
“Swiftly arose and spread around me the peace and knowledge
that pass all the argument of the earth,
And I know that the hand of God is the promise of my
own,
And I know that the spirit of God is the brother of my own,
And that all the men ever born are also my brothers, and the
women my sisters and lovers,

And that a kelson of the creation is love,
And limitless are leaves stiff or drooping in the fields,
And brown ants in the little wells beneath them,
And mossy scabs of the worm fence, heap'd stones, elder,
mullein and poke-weed.”
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
“Has any one supposed it lucky to be born? I hasten to inform him or her it is just as lucky to die, and I know it.”
Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman
“And to die is different from what anyone supposed, and
luckier.”
Walt Whitman, Leaves of grass