Jungian Archetypes Quotes

Quotes tagged as "jungian-archetypes" Showing 1-20 of 20
Louise Blackwick
“Puppets and paintbrushes...
Mario was well on his thousandth decapitation when it occurred to him these simple objects were mere symbolic manifestations of his deep-seated phobias: fear of failure and fear of success. The first one had stopped him from following his dream; the second had stopped the dream from following him.
“To be simultaneously afraid of success and of failure is like going to bed scared and waking up terrified,” he reflected. “Your mind’s all wooden, your head’s screwed on backwards and before you know it, you’re a vermillion blotch on someone else’s canvas and the entire world is pulling your strings.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Matthew Fox
“men should not be sexing their women in the missionary position because they are facing away from the sky. Instead of looking down, men are to look up. To the vastness of Father Sky”
Matthew Fox, The Hidden Spirituality of Men: Ten Metaphors to Awaken the Sacred Masculine

R. Alan Woods
“Yet, we must never 'throw the baby out with the bathwater'".

~R. Alan Woods [2012]”
R. Alan Woods, The Journey Is The Destination: A Photo Journal

Louise Blackwick
“What time is it?’
‘Whatever time you want it to be,’ she gave him a cheeky wink. ‘Now be honest, did you ask for free will?’
‘How did you—?’
Amanita joined Mario beneath the covers. The ethereal Threads tethering her wrists phased through the thick wool blankets like sunlight through a windowpane.
‘The bird that acknowledges its cage only ever sings of freedom,’ she said dreamily.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“It is only through an altered state of consciousness that a lesser being can see into the invisible and the immaterial. In our understanding, middling, certain substances are known to alter the manner a choice has been made. Some drugs will make one decide things one normally would not.’
‘And choices are our domain,’ explained another Master. ‘The fabric of reality is stringed together by the unseen Threads of choice and consequence. As actors, storytellers and audience of reality, we cannot afford reality to unwire.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“Sometimes we must allow our locked-and-tethered inner demon a short glimpse beyond the bars,” thought Mario, “lest we forget the full extent of our virtue. One’s power does not reside in the length of their demon’s claw, but in the strength of its manacle. The unleashed demon is worthless, lest it’s controlled.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“gold light burned faintly.
From his cosy window seat, Mario was tracing a frost-flower on the windowpane with an unsure finger. Were its perfectly-rendered geometric patterns a product of nature, or were they an artefact of metaphysics? Was the frost-flower to the Masters what a work of Art was to him? Did the Masters of Strings truly control every aspect of reality?
The fractal flower slowly melted under Mario’s fingertip.
“No work of chance here,” he bitterly thought. “This was by design.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“Mario blinked.

His reflection did not.

“That’s the odd thing about depression,” Mario reflected, “a human can survive anything, as long as they have a clear end in sight. A purpose. Take that away and they sink like pennies in mire: gently at first and then engulfed without notice by the dark waters of the bog.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“The demon looked insulted. ‘You don’t like the Underworld, brother?’
‘Can’ff ssay I do,’ spoke Mario through the curved claw held firmly between his teeth. ‘Much bffetter up tffhere!’ he pointed at the amber-glowing canopy perched at the very top of the World Tree.
‘Yeah but that seems like—,’ the green-eyed demon paused, as though he was bracing himself for something. ‘–work,’ he finally said. The word alone seemed to cause him unimaginable disgust. ‘How about you put that rock down and come waste time with us at the pit?”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“He was no marionette after all, but an autonomous individual in a staged performance; a production carefully arranged and assembled on his discrete behalf.

And he, Mario Fantoccio, had been invited on-stage to perform.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“So you put me through all this suffering just to taunt me?’

‘Humans suffer because they take seriously that which we create for entertainment.’

‘Oh really? Because let me tell you, I wasn’t the least bit entertained!’

‘That’s because you were not being entertained, Mr Fantoccio, you were being enlightened,’ stated the Mistress through a pair of foggy eyes. ‘You want to know why painting never worked for you? Because painters are creators and you, Mr Fantoccio, are an overseer. You don’t care about setting up the puppet show; you are merely interested in giving it a good ending. For you, Mr Fantoccio, creating the world was never enough; you aspire to run it. With every breath, you want to shape it. With every choice, you need to control it.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

C.G. Jung
“Cам Фрейд полагал, что интроверт — это тип патологически "зацикленный" на самом себе.”
C.G. Jung, Man and His Symbols

C.G. Jung
“До тех пор, пока не достигнута определенная степень самостоятельности, индивид не способен связать себя со своим взрослым окружением. Но героический миф не дает гарантий того, что этот выход на волю произойдет, а только показывает, какие условия необходимы, чтобы освобождение состоялось, так как без этого эго не сможет осознать себя. Затем остается осмысленно поддерживать и развивать это сознание с тем, чтобы не бесцельно прожить жизнь и почувствовать, что выделяешься из массы.”
C.G. Jung

C.G. Jung
“Если человек не видит смысла в своей жизни, то не имеет значения, ведет ли он пустую жизнь при коммунистическом или капиталистическом режиме. Свобода имеет смысл, только если можно использовать ее для создания чего-то значимого. Вот почему определить для себя смысл жизни первостепенно важно для личности. Отсюда следует, что индивидуация должна являться первоочередной задачей человека.”
C.G. Jung, Man and His Symbols

C.G. Jung
“До тех пор, пока мы еще погружены в природу, у нас нет сознания и мы живем под защитой инстинкта, не знающего проблем. Все, что осталось в нас от природы, бежит проблем, поскольку они суть сомнения, а где властвует сомнение, там и неопределенность и возможность выбора. А где есть возможность выбора, там инстинкт более не управляет нами и мы предаемся страху. Ибо сознание ныне призвано сделать то, что природа всегда делала для своих детей: а именно, принять определенное, бесспорное и безошибочное решение. И здесь нас охватывает слишком человеческий страх за то, что сознание— наша Прометеева победа — в конечном итоге не сможет послужить нам так же хорошо, как природа.
Таким образом, проблемы вовлекают нас в состояние одиночества и изоляции, где мы оставлены природой и стремимся к сознанию. Для нас нет другого пути; мы вынуждены прибегать к сознательным решениям и действиям там, где раньше доверялись естественному ходу событий. Следовательно, любая проблема несет в себе возможность расширения сознания, но вместе с тем и необходимость расставания с детской неосознанностью своих поступков и верой в природу.”
C.G. Jung, Man and His Symbols

Louise Blackwick
“Like an exploding cannonball, he was blasted out of his body – feet forward, arms clutching at his sides – through a tunnel of cold, midnight sky. Mario’s human instinct told him screaming was appropriate, and yet some other side of him was in transcendental awe.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“I... I had a dream,’ said Mario through a pained expression, ‘that my life was not my-my-my own. That I didn’t create my own destiny. That my fate was predetermined. Amanita, you don’t think—’
‘Shush,’ she whispered, placing a finger over his lips, ‘they might hear you...”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“Something about the gaping hole in the fabric of the cosmos gave him the chills. He leaned over the edge of the opening, expecting to find birds, or similar avian creations of the night’s sky.
Instead, he was met with a swarm of unspeakable horrors; winged, pitiful and grotesquely malformed, and to his great stupor, he noticed they had human faces and that they suffered. And as they poured out of the Well of Making, like children from the womb of the eternal feminine, these luciferin creatures spilled onto the world, shrieking in existential agony, for they knew the pain of their mortality.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“There were wires coming out of Amanita’s olive skin. Thin-as-hairs and in the colour of silver, the threads appeared to descend from the bedroom ceiling (without physically being tethered to it) only to wrap themselves securely around the woman’s unsuspecting wrists. Mario rubbed his eyes raw, trying to dispense with the illusion.
Amanita noticed him looking and pushed a lock of hair over her shoulder. As she moved, the white-metallic Thread followed her gesture without ever detaching from her wrist.
Mario automatically beheld his own hands. They were not shackled.
“She isn’t free!”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody

Louise Blackwick
“Everything I’ve previously attempted in my life was child’s play compared to this. The pathway I’m walking is not just riddled with all manner of uncertainty; it’s also excruciatingly difficult to follow through! How do I know this is the right path for me, when it’s been costing me every ounce of willpower just to stay on track? How do I tell what my purpose is?’

‘THIS is how you know it, Mario. This moment right here!’ Amanita had told him. ‘If the path you are walking feels back-breaking and steep, know you are climbing the Mountain of Purpose. The more you sacrifice on your journey, the more valuable its end reward.”
Louise Blackwick, The Underworld Rhapsody