House Of Leaves Quotes

Quotes tagged as "house-of-leaves" Showing 1-8 of 8
Mark Z. Danielewski
“Her smile, I'm sure, burnt Rome to the ground.”
Mark Z. Danielewski

Mark Z. Danielewski
“Here then at long last is my darkness. No cry of light, no glimmer, not even the faintest shard of hope to break free across the hold.”
Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

Mark Z. Danielewski
“Knowledge is hot water on wool. It shrinks time and space.”
Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

Mark Z. Danielewski
“i miss u i love you
there's no second ive lived you can't call your own”
Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

Mark Z. Danielewski
“Known.
Some.
Call.
Is.
Air.
Am?”
Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

Mark Z. Danielewski
“What is boredom? Endless repetitions, like, for example, Navidson’s corridors and rooms, which are consistently devoid of any Myst-like discoveries thus causing us to lose interest. What then makes anything exciting? Or better yet: what is exciting? While the degree varies, we are always excited by anything that engages us, influences us or more simply involves us. In those endlessly repetitive hallways and stairs, there is nothing for us to connect with. That permanently foreign place does not excite us. It bores us. And that is that, except for the fact that there is no such thing as boredom. Boredom is really a psychic defense protecting us from ourselves, from complete paralysis, by repressing, among other things, the meaning of that place, which in this case is and always has been horror.”
Mark Z. Danielewski's

Mark Z. Danielewski
“Quick note here: if this crush-slash-swooning stuff is hard for you to stomach; if you’ve never had a similar experience, then you should come to grips with the fact that you’ve got a TV dinner for a heart and might want to consider climbing inside a microwave and turning it on high for at least an hour, which if you do consider only goes to show what kind of idiot you truly are because microwaves are way too small for anyone, let alone you, to climb into.”
Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

Mark Z. Danielewski
“When a pebble falls down a well, it is gratifying to hear the eventual plunk. If, however, the pebble only slips into darkness and vanishes without a sound, the effect is disquieting. In the case of a verbal echo, spoken word acts as the pebble and the subsequent repetition serves as “the plunk.” In this way, speaking can result in a form of “seeing"...”
Mark Z. Danielewski's