Greek Gods Quotes

Quotes tagged as "greek-gods" Showing 1-30 of 79
Rick Riordan
“Can’t this thing go any faster?” Thalia demanded.
Zoe glared at her. “I cannot control traffic.”
You both sound like my mother,” I said.
Shut up!” they both said in union.”
Rick Riordan, The Titan's Curse

Esther M. Friesner
“Aphrodite had the beauty; Zeus had the thunderbolts. Everyone loved Aphrodite, but everyone listened to Zeus.”
Esther Friesner, Nobody's Princess

Rick Riordan
“He fixed his dark eyes on her. 'I am Kekrops, the first and eternal king of Athens. I would welcome you to my city.' He held up the covered platter. ' Also, I brought a Bundt cake.'

Piper glanced at her friends. 'A trick?'

'Probably?' Annabeth said.

'At least he brought dessert.' Percy smiled down at the snake guys. 'Welcome aboard!”
Rick Riordan, The Blood of Olympus

Rick Riordan
“At the end of the hall stood a walnut door with a bronze plaque:

ASCLEPIUS

MD, DMD, DME, DC, DVS, FAAN, OMG, EMT, TTYL, FRCP, ME, IOU, OD, OT, PHARMD, BAMF, RN, PHD, INC., SMH

There may have been more acronyms in the list, but by that point Leo's brain had exploded.”
Rick Riordan, The Blood of Olympus

Rick Riordan
“The wine god sighed. 'Oh Hades if I know. But remember, boy, that a kind act can sometimes be as powerful as a sword. As a mortal, I was never a great fighter or athlete or poet. I only made wine. The people in my village laughed at me. They said I would never amount to anything. Look at me now. Sometimes small things can become very large indeed.' He left me alone to think about that. And as I watched Clarisse and Chris singing a stupid campfire song together, holding hands in the darkness, where they thought nobody could see them, I had to smile.”
Rick Riordan, The Battle of the Labyrinth

Rick Riordan
“I wondered, not for the first time, why we Greek deities had never created a god of family therapy. We certainly could have used one. Or perhaps we had one before I was born, and she quit.”
Rick Riordan, The Burning Maze

Rick Riordan
“At the ed of the hall stood a walnut door with a bronze plaque:

ASCLEPIUS

MD, DMD, DME, DC, DVS, FAAN, OMG, EMT, TTYL, FRCP, ME, IOU, OD, OT, PHARMD, BAMF, RN, PHD, INC., SMH

There may have been more acronyms in the list, but by that point Leo's brain had exploded.”
Rick Riordan, The Blood of Olympus

Marie Phillips
“Hello," She said.
There was a long silence.
"Hello," said Artemis again.
"Are you talking to me?" said the tree. It had a faint Australian accent.
"Yes," said Artemis. "I am Artemis." If the tree experienced any recognition, it didn't show it. "I'm the goddess of hunting and chastity," said Artemis.
Another silence. The the tree said, "I'm Kate. I work in mergers and acquisitions for Goldman Sachs."
"Do you know what happened to you, Kate?" said Artemis.
The longest silence of all. Artemis was just about to repeat the question when the tree replied.
"I think I've turned into a tree," it said.
"Yes," said Artemis. "You have."
"Thank God for that," said the tree. "I thought I was going mad."
Then the tree seemed to reconsider this. "Actually," it said, "I think I would rather be mad." Then, with hope in its voice: "Are you sure I haven't gone mad?"
"I'm sure," said Artemis. "You're a tree. A eucalyptus. Subgenus of mallee. Variegated leaves."
"Oh," said the tree.
"Sorry," said Artemis.
"But with variegated leaves?"
"Yes," said Artemis. "Green and Yellow."
The tree seemed pleased. "Oh well, there's that to be grateful for," it said.”
Marie Phillips, Gods Behaving Badly

Homer
“Upon my word, just see how mortal men always put the blame on us gods! We are the source of evil, so they say - when they have only their own madness to think if their miseries are worse than they ought to be.”
Homer, The Odyssey

Stephen Fry
“...we do not lend the hearth quite the importance that our ancestors did, Greek or otherwise. Yet, even for us, the word stands for something more than just a fireplace. We speak of 'hearth and home'. The word 'hearth' shares its ancestry with 'heart', just as the modern Greek for 'hearth' is kardia, which also means 'heart'. In Ancient Greece the wider concept of hearth and home was expressed by the oikos, which lives on for us today in economics and ecology. The Latin for hearth is focus - with speaks for itself. It is a strange and wonderful thing that out of the words for fireplace we have spun "cardiologist', 'deep focus' and 'eco-warrior'. The essential meaning of centrality that connects them also reveals the great significance of the hearth to the Greeks and Romans, and consequently the importance of Hestia, its presiding deity.”
Stephen Fry, Mythos: The Greek Myths Retold

Homer
“The Lord gives and the Lord takes away, as it pleases him, for he can do all things.”
Homer

Barry B. Powell
“The Greek gods had personalities like those of humans and struggled with one another for position and power. They did not love humans (although some had favorites) and did not ask to be loved by them. They did not impose codes of behavior. They expected respect and honor but coud act contrary to human needs and desires.”
Barry B. Powell, Classical Myth

Amanda Bouchet
“I make a show of smoothing down my hair – a lost cause at this point. “Ah, that. It’s getting to the stage where it deserved a name. The Knotted Nest? The Twisted Tresses?”
“What about the Terrible Tangle?”
I nod. “That has serious possibilities.”
“The Matted Mess?” he suggests.”
Amanda Bouchet, Breath of Fire

Stephen Fry
“Creation at this time, peopled as it was by primal deities whose whole energy and purpose seems to have been directed towards reproduction, was endowed with an astonishing fertility. The soil was blessed with such a fecund richness that one could almost believe that if you planted a pencil it would burst into flower.”
Stephen Fry, Mythos: The Greek Myths Retold

Krystal Shannan
“How is it that I am completely naked while you haven’t shed even one stitch of clothing?”
“Because you were dinner, Rebecca.”
A snort escaped, mixing with her laughter. “Remind me to have dinner with you more often. I have been missing out.”
“You? What about me?”
Krystal Shannan, Open House

Amanda Bouchet
“I huff. Sort of. “Well, would Your Logicalness care to take me to breakfast and tell me about his plans?”
… “Would your Nakedness care to get dressed first?” he asks.”
Amanda Bouchet, Breath of Fire

Mary Renault
“Each moment free from fear makes a man immortal.

- Herakles”
Mary Renault, The Alexander Trilogy

Mary Renault
“Each moment free from fear makes a man immortal.”
Mary Renault, The Alexander Trilogy

Rick Riordan
“She fixed me with her cold gray stare, and I realized what a terrible enemy Athena would make, ten times worse than Ares or Dionysus or maybe even my father. Athena would never give up. She would never do something rash or stupid just because she hated you, and if she made a plan to destroy you, it would not fail.”
Rick Riordan, The Titan's Curse

Tammie Painter
“Personally, I thought it chancy to rely on only one god. It struck me as akin to placing all your drachars on one chariot at the races...It didn't seem logical that one god could ensure the proper working of the world.”
Tammie Painter, Domna, Part One: The Sun God's Daughter

George O'Connor
“Orion never appreciated the wild places for what they are. Wild things need to be left free to preserve what makes them special.
He saw everything in the world around him as a trophy to collect. As something to possess. Even me. I am wild, untamed, unattached, unfettered. To love me is to appreciate that. And I am fortunate indeed to have many who love me.
Sometimes, to best tell your own story, you need it to be told by another.
I am the protector of women and the friend of young girls. The helper of childbirth, she who soothes. I am the caretaker of the wild places, the mountains, marshes, the pastures and wetlands.

I am Artemis, goddess of the wild hunt.”
George O'Connor, Artemis: Wild Goddess of the Hunt

Tammie Painter
“I'm not a gift for you to present to Sirius...I want to ride in with my head held high, as an equal to my husband....[Sirius] wanted a woman the gods said would make him great. That woman isn't going to be hauled about like a crate of potatoes.”
Tammie Painter, Domna, Part Two: The Solon's Son (Domna

“Youths who were most handsome. Adonis, son of Cinyras and Smyrna, whom Venus [Aphrodite] loved. Endymion, son of Aetolus, whom Luna [Selene] loved. Ganymede, son of Erichthonius, whom Jove [Zeus] loved. Hyacinthus, son of Oebalus, whom Apollo loved. Narcissus, son of the river Cephisus, who loved himself.”
Hyginus Gromaticus

Stephen Fry
“Besides, I can hear the beasts stamping and lowing in the back. I’d know their moo anywhere. That baby is a thief and I demand—”
Stephen Fry, Mythos: The Greek Myths Retold

Euripides
“Agaue was foaming at the mouth; her rolling eyes
Were wild; she was not in her right mind, but possessed”
Euripides, The Bacchae and Other Plays

Rick Riordan
“Some people even thought they had visions of the gods if they chugged enough wine. (Again: do not try this at home. You will not see the Greek gods. You may get a close-up view of your toilet as you are throwing up, but you will not see gods.)”
Rick Riordan, Percy Jackson's Greek Gods

Rick Riordan
“I recalled something Dionysus had once told me about his twin sons, Castor and Pollux--back when he was living with his mortal wife during a short phase of "domestic bliss." He'd claimed that two was the best number for children, because after two, your children outnumbered you.”
Rick Riordan, The Tower of Nero

Rick Riordan
“How had subterranean frog people in love with hats and lizards become mortal enemies to a breed of bright-red devil bulls? Perhaps at the beginning of time, the elder gods had told the first trogs, You may now pick your nemesis! And the first trogs had pointed across the newly made fields of creations and yelled, We hate those cows!”
Rick Riordan, The Tower of Nero

Rick Riordan
“Nero was so good at being evil, and so evil at being good, he made the words lose their meaning. He could tell you the floor was the ceiling with such conviction you might start believing it, especially since any diagreement would unleash the Beast.

I marveled how such a man could rise to be emperor of Rome. Then I marveled how such a man could ever lose control of Rome. It was easy to see how he'd gotten the mobs on his side.”
Rick Riordan, Trials of Apollo, The Book Five The Tower of Nero

Alexis  Hall
“Fame has taken the place of religion in the 21st century. The Beyoncés and the Brangelinas of our world filling the void left by the gods and heroes of antiquity. But like most cliches, there's an element of truth to it. And the gods of old were merciless. For every Theseus who slays the Minotaur and returns home in triumph, there's an Ariadne abandoned on the isles of Naxos. There's an Aegeus, casting himself into the ocean at the sight of a black sail...In another life, I like to think that Luc O'Donnell and I might've worked out. In the short time I knew him, I saw a man with an endless potential trapped in a maze he couldn't even name. And from time to time, I think how many tens of thousands like him there must be in the world. Insignificant on a planet of billions, but a staggering number when considered as a whole. All stumbling about, blinded by reflected glory, never knowing where to step, or what to trust. Blessed and cursed by the Midas touch of our digital era divinity.”
Alexis Hall, Boyfriend Material

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