Golden Age Quotes

Quotes tagged as "golden-age" Showing 1-30 of 35
Elizabeth Coatsworth
“The magic of autumn has seized the countryside; now that the sun isn't ripening anything it shines for the sake of the golden age; for the sake of Eden; to please the moon for all I know.”
Elizabeth Coatsworth, Personal Geography: Almost an Autobiography

Jessie Burton
“The rules of this house are written in water. I must either sink or swim.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Northrop Frye
“I feel separated and cut off from the world around me, but occasionally I've felt that it was really a part of me, and I hope I'll have that feeling again, and that next time it won't go away. That's a dim, misty outline of the story that's told so often, of how man once lived in a golden age or a garden of Eden or the Hesperides ... how that world was lost, and how we some day may be able to get it back again. ... This story of the loss and regaining of identity is, I think, the framework of all literature.”
Northrop Frye, The Educated Imagination

Charles Baudelaire
“Do you know that high fever which invades us in our cold suffering, that aching for a land we do not know, that anguish of curiosity? There is a country which resembles you, where everything is beautiful, sumptuous, authentic, still, where fantasy has built and adorned a western China, where life is sweet to breathe, where happiness is wed to silence. That is where to live, that is where to die!"

- Invitation to a Voyage”
Charles Baudelaire, Paris Spleen and Wine and Hashish

A.S. Byatt
“The men and women of the Golden Age, Hesiod wrote, lived in an eternal spring, for hundreds of years, always youthful, fed on acorns from a great oak, on wild fruits, on honey. In the Silver Age, which is less written about, the people lived for 100 years as children, without growing up, and then quite suddenly aged and died. The Fabians and the social scientists, writers and teachers saw, in a way earlier generations had not, that children were people, with identities and desires and intelligences. They saw that they were neither dolls, nor toys, nor miniature adults. They saw, many of them, that children needed freedom, needed not only to learn, and be good, but to play and be wild. But they saw this, so many of them, out of a desire of their own for a perpetual childhood, a Silver Age.”
A.S. Byatt, The Children's Book

Jessie Burton
“The turnip cannot thrive in the tulips patch of soil.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Kathleen Tessaro
“It's amazing how lonely a place where you were once happy can become.”
Kathleen Tessaro, Rare Objects

Jessie Burton
“I feel younger than eighteen but burdened as a eighty-year-old.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Greg Bear
“It was when a society became most distressed and antiquated that it would recreate an overwhelming fantasy of some Golden Age, a time when all was great and glorious, when people were more noble and causes more magnificent and honorable.”
Greg Bear, Foundation and Chaos

Jean-Luke Swanepoel
“Old Bette Davis movies are all she watches now. There’s one where Bette Davis’s character goes blind, and as the credits rolled my mother said, ‘Must be what they mean when they talk about Bette Davis eyes.”
Jean-Luke Swanepoel, The Thing About Alice

“An intellectual golden age produces sages. An intellectual dark age produces fools. An intellectual dark age that fancies itself golden produces intellectuals.”
Jakub Bożydar Wiśniewski

Donna Tartt
“They really knew how to work this edge, the Dutch painters―ripeness sliding into rot. The fruit’s perfect but it won’t last, it’s about to go. And see here especially,” she said, reaching over my shoulder to trace the air with her finger, “this passage―the butterfly.” The underwing was so powdery an delicate it looked as if the color would smear if she touched it. “How beautiful he plays it. Stillness with a tremble of movement.”
Donna Tartt, The Goldfinch

Jessie Burton
“The night darkens, the stars unfriendly, the cold a knife upon her neck - but Nella waits, until she can no longer difference between Johannes and the darkness that carries him away.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“What was once, is no longer.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“There are horizons through the brickwork, you wait and see.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“We're nothing more than prisoners to your desire.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“Words are water in this city. One drop of rumour could drown us.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“Because, Petronella - it's something in his soul. It's something in his soul and you can't get it out.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“All we can do if we're lucky is stich up the mistakes other people make.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“That may be. But to decide that I was never going to live as a proper woman was not your choice to make.' 'What do you mean a proper woman?' 'A proper woman marries - she has children -' 'Then what does that make me? Am I not a proper woman? Last time I looked I certainly was.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“Love your children, for they are the seeds that will make this city bloom.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“Take care, take care. This city thrives! It's money gives you wings to soar. But it is a yoke on your shoulders and you would do well to take note of the bruise around your neck.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“Believe it or don't believe it, Madame. But my feet are tired too. Bloody tired. Like a dead man's.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

Jessie Burton
“The ink was secret nectar, for Marin isn't married.”
Jessie Burton, The Miniaturist

“White Christian America had its golden age in the 1950s, after the hardships and victories of World War Ii and before the cultural upheavals of the 1960s. June Cleaver was its mother, Andy Griffith was its sheriff, Norman Rockwell was its artist. and Billy Graham and Norman Vincent Peale were its ministers.”
Robert P. Jones, The End of White Christian America

Margery Allingham
“There are some people to whom muddled thinking and self-deception are the two most unforgivable crimes in the world.”
Margery Allingham, The Fashion in Shrouds

Ehsan Sehgal
“I marry in the aged of the golden age. I adore taking such risks, it does not matter if any companion throws me on the street, but I do not stop, I will try next. It is the determination of my life.”
Ehsan Sehgal

J.R.R. Tolkien
“But when Aragorn arose all that beheld him gazed in silence, for it seemed to
them that he was revealed to them now for the first time. Tall as the sea-kings of old, he
stood above all that were near; ancient of days he seemed and yet in the flower of
manhood; and wisdom sat upon his brow, and strength and healing were in his hands,
and a light was about him. And then Faramir cried:
'Behold the King!'
And in that moment all the trumpets were blown, and the King Elessar went
forth and came to the barrier, and Húrin of the Keys thrust it back; and amid the music
of harp and of viol and of flute and the singing of clear voices the King passed through
the flower-laden streets, and came to the Citadel, and entered in; and the banner of the Tree and the Stars was unfurled upon the topmost tower, and the reign of King Elessar
began, of which many songs have told.
In his time the City was made more fair than it had ever been, even in the days of
its first glory; and it was filled with trees and with fountains, and its gates were
wrought of mithril and steel, and its streets were paved with white marble; and the Folk
of the Mountain laboured in it, and the Folk of the Wood rejoiced to come there; and all
was healed and made good, and the houses were filled with men and women and the
laughter of children, and no window was blind nor any courtyard empty; and after the
ending of the Third Age of the world into the new age it preserved the memory and the
glory of the years that were gone.”
J.R.R. Tolkien

J.R.R. Tolkien
“and all was healed and made good, and the houses were filled with men and women and the laughter of children, and no window was blind nor any courtyard empty;
and after the ending of the Third Age of the world into the new age it preserved the memory and the glory of the years that were gone.”
J.R.R. Tolkien, The Return of the King

Donna Tartt
“Whenever you see flies or insects in a still life―a wilted petal, a black spot on the apple―the painter is giving you a secret message. He’s telling you that living things don’t last―it’s all temporary. Death in life. That’s why they’re called natures mortes. Maybe you don’t see it at first with all the beauty and bloom, the little speck of rot. But if you look closer―there it is.”
Donna Tartt, The Goldfinch

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