G K Chesterton Quotes

Quotes tagged as "g-k-chesterton" (showing 1-21 of 21)
G.K. Chesterton
“Hope is the power of being cheerful in circumstances which we know to be desperate.”
G. K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton
“Another savage trait of our time is the disposition to talk about material substances instead of about ideas. The old civilisation talked about the sin of gluttony or excess. We talk about the Problem of Drink--as if drink could be a problem. When people have come to call the problem of human intemperance the Problem of Drink, and to talk about curing it by attacking the drink traffic, they have reached quite a dim stage of barbarism. The thing is an inverted form of fetish worship; it is no sillier to say that a bottle is a god than to say that a bottle is a devil. The people who talk about the curse of drink will probably progress down that dark hill. In a little while we shall have them calling the practice of wife-beating the Problem of Pokers; the habit of housebreaking will be called the Problem of the Skeleton-Key Trade; and for all I know they may try to prevent forgery by shutting up all the stationers' shops by Act of Parliament.”
G.K. Chesterton, All Things Considered

“Never be afraid to try something new. Remember professionals built the Titanic but an amateur built the ark.”
Father Brown

C.S. Lewis
“For the critics who think Chesterton frivolous or 'paradoxical' I have to work hard to feel even pity; sympathy is out of the question.”
C. S. Lewis

G.K. Chesterton
“International peace means a peace between nations, not a peace after the destruction of nations, like the Buddhist peace after the destruction of personality. The golden age of the good European is like the heaven of the Christian: it is a place where people will love each other; not like the heaven of the Hindu, a place where they will be each other.”
G.K. Chesterton, All Things Considered

G.K. Chesterton
“Dickens didn't write what people wanted. He wanted what people wanted.”
G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton
“The rolling stone rolls echoing from rock to rock; but the rolling stone is dead. The moss is silent because the moss is alive.”
G.K. Chesterton

R. Alan Woods
“Chesterton had an incorrigible and persistent tendency to throw-the-baby-out-with-the-bathwater.”
R. Alan Woods, The Journey Is the Destination: A Book of Quotes With Commentaries

Neil Gaiman
“Behind every Chesterton sentence there was someone painting with words, and it seemed to me that at the end of any particularly good sentence or any perfectly-put paradox, you could hear the author, somewhere behind the scenes, giggling with delight.”
Neil Gaiman

G.K. Chesterton
“All ceremony depends on symbol; and all symbols have been vulgarized and made stale by the commercial conditions of our time...Of all these faded and falsified symbols, the most melancholy example is the ancient symbol of the flame. In every civilized age and country, it has been a natural thing to talk of some great festival on which "the town was illuminated." There is no meaning nowadays in saying the town was illuminated...The whole town is illuminated already, but not for noble things. It is illuminated solely to insist on the immense importance of trivial and material things, blazoned from motives entirely mercenary...It has not destroyed the difference between light and darkness, but it has allowed the lesser light to put out the greater...Our streets are in a permanent dazzle, and our minds in a permanent darkness.”
G.K. Chesterton, The G.K. Chesterton Collection [34 Books]

G.K. Chesterton
“If I had one sermon to preach, it would be a sermon against Pride. The more I see of existence...the more I am convinced of the reality of the old religious thesis, that all evil began with some attempt at superiority; some moment when, as we might say, the very skies were cracked across like a mirror, because there was a sneer in Heaven.”
G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton
“Angels can fly because they can take themselves lightly. This has always been the instinct of Christendom, and especially the instinct of Christian art. Remember how Fra Angelico represented all his angels, not only as birds, but almost as butterflies. Remember how the most earnest medieval art was full of light and fluttering draperies, of quick and capering feet...In the old Christian pictures the sky over every figure is like a blue or gold parachute. Every figure seems ready to fly up and float about in the heavens. The tattered cloak of the beggar will bear him up like the rayed plumes of the angels. But the kings in their heavy gold and the proud in their robes of purple will all of their nature sink downwards, for pride cannot rise to levity or levitation. Pride is the downward drag of all things into an easy solemnity. One "settles down" into a sort of selfish seriousness; but one has to rise to a gay self-forgetfulness. A man "falls" into a brown study; he reaches up at a blue sky.”
G.K. Chesterton

Frank Sheed
“Now when a man is as right as that in his forecasts, there is some reason to think he may be right in his premises.”
F.J. Sheed

G.K. Chesterton
“So it does not matter (comparatively speaking) how often humanity fails to imitate its ideal; for then all its old failures are fruitful. But it does frightfully matter how often humanity changes its ideal; for then all its old failures are fruitless.”
G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

G.K. Chesterton
“A small circle is quite as infinite as a large circle; but, though it is quite as infinite, it is not so large.”
G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

G.K. Chesterton
“the things common to all men are more important than the things peculiar to any men. Ordinary things are more valuable than extraordinary things; nay, they are more extraordinary. Man is something more awful than men; something more strange. The sense of the miracle of humanity itself should be always more vivid to us than any marvels of power, intellect, art, or civilization. The mere man on two legs, as such, should be felt as something more heartbreaking than any music and more startling than any caricature. Death is more tragic even than death by starvation. Having a nose is more comic even than having a Norman nose.

This is the first principle of democracy: that the essential things in men are the things they hold in common, not the things they hold separately. And the second principle is merely this: that the political instinct or desire is one of these things which they hold in common. Falling in love is more poetical than dropping into poetry. The democratic contention is that government (helping to rule the tribe) is a thing like falling in love, and not a thing like dropping into poetry. It is not something analogous to playing the church organ, painting on vellum, discovering the North Pole (that insidious habit), looping the loop, being Astronomer Royal, and so on. For these things we do not wish a man to do at all unless he does them well. It is, on the contrary, a thing analogous to writing one's own love-letters or blowing one's own nose. These things we want a man to do for himself, even if he does them badly.”
G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

G.K. Chesterton
“An artist will betray himself by some sort of sincerity.”
G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton
“Life exists for the love of music or beautiful things.”
G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton
“He who wills to reject nothing, wills the destruction of will; for will is not only the choice of something, but the rejection of almost everything.”
G.K. Chesterton

G.K. Chesterton
“A man reading the Dickens novel wished that it might never end. Men read a Dickens story six times because they knew it so well.”
G.K. Chesterton, Charles Dickens: A Critical Study

G.K. Chesterton
“Let beliefs fade fast and frequently, if you wish institutions to remain the same. The more the life of the mind is unhinged, the more the machinery of matter will be left to itself.”
G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy