Fyodor Dostoevsky Quotes

Quotes tagged as "fyodor-dostoevsky" (showing 1-8 of 8)
Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“I am a fool with a heart but no brains, and you are a fool with brains but no heart; and we’re both unhappy, and we both suffer.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Idiot

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“He was one of the numerous and varied legion of dullards, of half-animated abortions, conceited, half-educated coxcombs, who attach themselves to the idea most in fashion only to vulgarize it and who caricature every cause they serve, however sincerely.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“There is something spiteful and yet open-hearted about you”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

Albert Camus
“The reasoning is classic in its clarity. If God does not exist, Kirilov is god. If God does not exist, Kirilov must kill himself. Kirilov must therefore kill himself to become god. That logic is absurd, but it is what is needed.”
Albert Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Listen, Parfyon, a few moments ago you asked me a question, and this is my answer: the essence of religious feeling has nothing to do with any reasoning, or any crimes and misdemeanors or atheism; is is something entirely different and it will always be so; it is something our atheists will always overlook, and they will never talk about THAT. But the important thing is that you will notice it most clearly in a Russian heart, and that's the conclusion I've come to! This is one of the chief convictions I have acquired in our Russia. There's work to be done, Parfyon. Believe me, there's work to be done in our Russian world!”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Idiot

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“To kill for murder is an immeasurably greater evil than the crime itself. Murder by legal process is immeasurably more dreadful than murder by a brigand. A man who is murdered by brigands is killed at night in a forest or somewhere else, and up to the last moment he still hopes that he will be saved. There have been instances when a man whose throat had already been cut, was still hoping, or running away or begging for his life to be spared. But here all this last hope, which makes it ten times easier to die, is taken away FOR CERTAIN; here you have been sentenced to death, and the whole terrible agony lies in the fact that you will most certainly not escape, and there is no agony greater than that. Take a soldier and put him in front of a cannon in battle and fire at him and he will still hope, but read the same soldier his death sentence FOR CERTAIN, and he will go mad or burst out crying. Who says that human nature is capable of bearing this without madness? Why this cruel, hideous, unnecessary, and useless mockery? Possibly there are men who have sentences of death read out to them and have been given time to go through this torture, and have then been told, You can go now, you've been reprieved. Such men could perhaps tell us. It was of agony like this and of such horror that Christ spoke. No, you can't treat a mean like that.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Fyodor Dostoyevsky
“Something was not dead within me, in the depths of my heart and conscience it would not die, and it showed itself in acute depression.”
Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Emily  Williams
“Fyodor Dostoevsky, a Russian writer, a writer of whom I greatly admire once said, ‘We sometimes encounter people, even perfect strangers, who begin to interest us at first sight, somehow suddenly, all at once, before a word is spoken.”
Emily Williams, Letters to Eloise