France Quotes

Quotes tagged as "france" Showing 181-210 of 312
Charles Finch
“There's nowhere that life feels more eternal, your dimwit youth more important, than Paris.”
Charles Finch, The Last Enchantments

Mark Zero
“In French culture, the best way of buying time or getting off the hook entirely in a thorny personal situation is to claim that it’s complicated. The French did not invent love, but they did invent romance, so they’ve had more time than any other culture on earth to refine the nuances of its language.”
Mark Zero, The French Art of Revenge

Widad Akreyi
“Our values were under attacks, in Paris
Tell them:
We stand UNITED
We'll defend our values
We'll NOT be DIVIDED”
Widad Akrawi

Malcolm X
“The Algerians were revolutionsists, they wanted land. France offered to let them be integrated into France. They told France, to hell with Fance, they wanted some land, not some France.”
Malcolm X

Ben Aaronovitch
“He was a Parisian,’ he said. ‘You can never be sure what Parisians believe in – beyond Paris of course.”
Ben Aaronovitch, The Home Crowd Advantage

Widad Akreyi
“I Will Follow Anyone
And Ask Everyone
To Stand Together
As One Civilisation
Against Terrorism”
Widad Akrawi

Widad Akreyi
“Generalization is the biggest challenge that must be dealt with if we are to create spaces for constructive dialogue where muslims feel they are welcomed. This is equally true with regards to Westerners! Not all Westerners are against muslims, and not all terrorist attacks in the West are linked to Islamic jihadists.”
Widad Akrawi

Mark Zero
“The French have a penchant for absolutism, for thinking that things are all one way or all another, which is why their politics are marked by a general inability to compromise and why they tend to hold their personal opinions until the bitter end, even after they have clearly lost an argument.”
Mark Zero, The French Art of Revenge

Widad Akreyi
“The free world cannot afford to accept any form of extremism, whether it is fascism, racism or religious extremism.”
Widad Akrawi

A.J. Liebling
“Hitler was the archetype of the abstemious man. When the other krauts saw him drink water in the Beer Hall they should have known he was not to be trusted.”
A.J. Liebling

Barbara T. Cerny
“By the second cycle of the solstice of the warm time, the One will face the enemy. And the One will unearth the Shield of the Northern Lights and smote the enemy with daring and intelligence. The heart of the One is pious and evil will cower. Couatl will rise.”
Barbara T. Cerny, Shield of the Palidine

Barbara T. Cerny
“And the One will win the Armor of the Easter Dawn and defeat the enemy with audacity and wisdom. The body of the One is strong and ready to lead. Lammasu will pounce”
Barbara T. Cerny, Shield of the Palidine

Timothée de Fombelle
“Tous les chagrins sont méprisants, imprenables, perchés à des hauteurs que personne ne peux rejoindre. Peut-être a-t-on trop peur qu'une consolation efface ce qu'il reste des souvenirs.”
Timothée de Fombelle, Un prince sans royaume

Widad Akreyi
“I will follow anyone... and invite everyone... too unite and defend the freedom of expression.”
Widad Akrawi

Anthony Trollope
“Oh! do look at Miss Oriel's bonnet the next time you see her. I cannot understand why it should be so, but I am sure of this—no English fingers could put together such a bonnet as that; and I am nearly sure that no French fingers could do it in England.”
Anthony Trollope, Dr. Thorne

“This medical view of an ideal male who was insulated from pathogens was inextricably bound up with a parallel discourse about the maintenance of strong ego boundaries, a psychic investment in one’s bodily peripheries that effected a gradual closing (and, one might say, a closing off) of the male body, at once from the outer world of dangerous stimuli and from the inner world of threatening passions. Without a doubt, as Norbert Elias has shown, in the western world both men and women experienced a shift in their sense of personal boundaries during the early modern era where, amid changing social circumstances, rising thresholds of repugnance and shame were manifested among the upper-classes as a growing aversion to their own bodily functions and to the bodies of others. The changes wrought by new developments in table manners and etiquette were extended by the introduction of hygienic practices in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries that endeavored to maximise the order and cleanliness of the social body while futher compartmentalising the bourgeois self as a discrete bodily unit.”
Christopher Forth

Susanna Clarke
“Ha!" cried Dr John contemptuously. "Magic! That is chiefly used for killing Frenchmen, is it not?”
Susanna Clarke, Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell

Lucy Foley
“It was then I thought of Corsica, the place we had discovered together. I craved the wind, the sun and salt, the simplicity of the island.”
Lucy Foley, The Book of Lost and Found

Mark Zero
“... she was a pudding of immaturity and precocious wisdom that had not yet set into a stable mold.”
Mark Zero, The French Art of Revenge

“Self-preservation and determination meant she could get away with anything. As her law-abiding, conventionally minded daughter, I secretly envied her this. She was not the clinging-vine type, nor one who could coax sugar from a lemon. Hers was the frontal attack with no inhibitions. She told the Nazis you could not trust Hitler, and they let her go. In the days of chaperones, she hitch-hiked a ride on a French destroyer along the coast of Crete; 'All quite proper, I had my cook with me,' she explained.”
Mary Allsebrook

Barbara T. Cerny
“And the One will reveal the Bow of the Southern Star and conquer the enemy with courage and fine judgment. The sight of the One is true and the enemy cannot hide. Griffon will fly”
Barbara T. Cerny, Shield of the Palidine

“Paris n'est pas une ville, c'est un pays.”
Francois I

Marcia DeSanctis
“We love the carnal sway of the Eiffel Tower and the stories of France’s great queens and mistresses told in the châteaux of Versailles and Chenonceau. Of course, we love the perfume, to scan the market for the best deal on fresh figs, the hollow clack of cobblestones under our heels, the citrusy scent of gorse blowing across a field in Normandy. We love the safety and ease of the Paris Métro and marvel at the sweep of almond blossoms in Haute-Provence. We gasp at the beauty of the bridges over the Seine and always feel at home when we stop in the middle of one to gaze down at the cottony wake of the Bateaux Mouches. We love the mountain air that refreshes us in the Alps, and the nighttime clouds that eat the stars over the Breton coast. We love to slow down, and France requires us to do so. In France, we find what we are missing.”
Marcia DeSanctis, 100 Places in France Every Woman Should Go
tags: france

Timothée de Fombelle
“Elle voulait autre chose. Des mains qui se touchent sans rien donner.”
Timothée de Fombelle, Un prince sans royaume

Mark Zero
“It wasn’t playing both sides of the fence – it was betting against yourself but still playing to win – and it encapsulated everything absurd and paradoxical that I loved about the French.”
Mark Zero, The French Art of Revenge

“Si mantenemos la palabra, la palabra nos mantendrá.”
France Quere

Mark Zero
“When you’re used to being in dangerous situations, you develop a sixth sense about your surroundings, about where possible enemies might be lurking, how many steps it will take to reach the next corner on a dead run, the best hiding places if bullets start to fly...”
Mark Zero, The French Art of Revenge

Mark Zero
“I congratulate you on your success stealing the painting.”
Mark Zero, The French Art of Revenge

Mark Zero
“Never run upstairs when someone’s chasing you. Don’t try to quick-draw a man who already has his gun out. Never light a match in the dark in a strange building. Half of staying safe is just keeping your head and being prudent.”
Mark Zero, The French Art of Revenge

Enock Maregesi
“Radia Hosni, mhitimu wa mikanda miwili myeusi ya sanaa za mapigano za kareti na kung’fu katika ngazi ya dani mbili za kung’fu na dani moja ya kareti, mwanajeshi wa Tunisia aliyepata mafunzo ya kawaida ya kijeshi nchini Ufaransa na mafunzo ya kikomandoo nchini Uingereza kabla ya kujiunga na Tume ya Dunia, alikuwa mshindi wa tuzo ya shujaa wa taifa la Tunisia. Hussein Kashoggi alipokuwa akiwasili Tunis kutokea Copenhagen, Radia alikuwa katika Uwanja wa Mpira wa El Menzah akiangalia mechi kati ya Stade Tunisien na Espérance ST – timu ambayo mchumba wake Fathi Meoki alikuwa kocha msaidizi. Fujo zilipozuka, baada ya Stade Tunisien kufungwa bao moja kwa sifuri na Espérance ST, Radia alipanda Quadrifoglio na kuondoka kuelekea Uwanja wa Ndege wa Tunis-Carthage; ambapo alimpokea Hussein Kashoggi na jambazi wa Kolonia Santita, Delfina Moore.”
Enock Maregesi