Editing Quotes

Quotes tagged as "editing" Showing 31-60 of 172
E.A. Bucchianeri
“Editors can be stupid at times. They just ignore that author’s intention. I always try to read unabridged editions, so much is lost with cut versions of classic literature, even movies don’t make sense when they are edited too much. I love the longueurs of a book even if they seem pointless because you can get a peek into the author’s mind, a glimpse of their creative soul. I mean, how would people like it if editors came along and said to an artist, ‘Whoops, you left just a tad too much space around that lily pad there, lets crop that a bit, shall we?’. Monet would be ripping his hair out.”
E.A. Bucchianeri, Brushstrokes of a Gadfly,

S. Kelley Harrell, M. Div.
“A good editor doesn't rewrite words, she rewires synapses.”
S. Kelley Harrell

Betsy Lerner
“When an editor works with an author, she cannot help seeing into the medicine cabinet of his soul. All the terrible emotions, the desire for vindications, the paranoia, and the projection are bottled in there, along with all the excesses of envy, desire for revenge, all the hypochondriacal responses, rituals, defenses, and the twin obsessions with sex and money. It other words, the stuff of great books.”
Betsy Lerner, The Forest for the Trees

Betsy Lerner
“It was a miracle to me, this transformation of my acorns into an oak.”
Betsy Lerner, The Forest for the Trees

S. Kelley Harrell, M. Div.
“Editing is the very edge of your knowledge forced to grow--a test you can't cheat on.”
S. Kelley Harrell

Bridie Clark
“I'd known since girlhood that I wanted to be a book editor. By high school, I'd pore over the acknowledgments section of novels I loved, daydreaming that someday a brilliant talent might see me as the person who 'made her book possible' or 'enhanced every page with editorial wisdom and insight.' Could I be the Maxwell Perkins to some future Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Wolfe?”
Bridie Clark, Because She Can

Libba Bray
“I am hard at work on the second draft ... Second draft is really a misnomer as there are a gazillion revisions, large and small, that go into the writing of a book.”
Libba Bray

Robert Louis Stevenson
“There is a kind of gaping admiration that would fain roll Shakespeare and Bacon into one, to have a bigger thing to gape at; and a class of men who cannot edit one author without disparaging all others.”
Robert Louis Stevenson, Edinburgh: Picturesque Notes

Michael Marshall Smith
“I work in my study, taking the collections of words that people send me and making small adjustments to them, changing something here and there, checking everything is in order and putting a part of myself into the text by introducing just a little bit of difference. ("Substitutions")”
Michael Marshall Smith, Best New Horror 22

Blaise Pascal
“Je n'ai fait celle-ci plus longue que parce que je n'ai pas eu le loisir de la faire plus courte.”
Blaise Pascal

Celine Kiernan
On the Hunger Games Fan Race fail and the portrayal of POC in fantasy literature:
It is as if the POC in the text are walking around with a great big red sign over them for some editors and it reads I AM NOT A REAL CHARACTER. I AM A PROBLEM YOU MUST DEAL WITH. The white characters are permitted to saunter about with their physical descriptions hanging out all over the place, but best not make mention of dark skin or woolly/curly hair or dark eyes (Unless, of course, that character is white. None of my white-skinned dark-eyed characters had any problem being described as such. And I’m pretty sure that Sól’s curly hair never gave anyone a single pause for thought.) As I said, I understand the desire not to define a POC simply by their physical attributes, and I understand cutting physical descriptions if no other character is described physically – but pussyfooting about in this manner with POC is doing nothing but white wash the characters themselves. It’s already much too hard to get readers to latch onto the fact that some characters may not be caucasian, why must we dance about their physical description as if it were some kind of shameful dirty little secret. You know what it reminds me of? It reminds me of the way homosexuality used to only ever be hinted at in texts. It was up to the reader to ‘read between the lines’ or ‘its there if you look for it’ and all that total bullshit which used to be the norm.”
Celine Kiernan

“The thing you don't realize, my dear girl, is that I have been forced by the economic realities to start taking publishing very seriously. For example, it has been brought to my attention that our ability to continue to pay the hordes of people employed by M&S (God knows how many mouths have to be fed) depends directly on the number of copies of your new book [Life Before Man] that we are able to sell between September and Christmas. In past I have been able to treat this whole thing as a fun game. I have never been troubled by the cavalier explanations about lost manuscripts and fuck-ups of various sorts. Now I have learned that this is a deadly serious game. I don't laugh at jokes about the Canadian postal service. I cry. (in a letter to author Margaret Atwood, dated February, 1979)”
Jack McClelland, Imagining Canadian Literature: The Selected Letters

Christina Dodd
“You can always fix crap. You can’t fix a blank page.”
Christina Dodd

Mokokoma Mokhonoana
“A book that is made up of only great sentences is not necessarily a great book.”
Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Jessica de la Davies
“Good writing is both what one does and does not say.”
Jessica de la Davies

Douglas Wilson
“Writing well is more than mechanics, but it is not less.”
Douglas Wilson, Wordsmithy: Hot Tips for the Writing Life

Jhumpa Lahiri
“[T]hey are trying to find the right word, to choose, finally, the one that is most exact, most incisive. It's a process of sifting, which is exhausting and, at times, exasperating. Writers can't avoid it. The heart of the craft lies there.”
Jhumpa Lahiri, In Other Words

John McPhee
“Writing is selection. Just to start a piece of writing you have to choose one word and only one from more than a million in the language. Now keep going. What is your next word?”
John McPhee, Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process

Amor Towles
“But after the war, when editors like Martin Durk came to prominence by trumpeting the timely death of the novel, Parish opted for a reflective silence. He stopped taking on projects and watched with quiet reserve as his authors died off one by one--at peace with the notion that he would join them soon enough in that circle of Elysium reserved for plot and substance and the judicious use of the semicolon.”
Amor Towles, Rules of Civility

Craig D. Lounsbrough
“If we use the ‘pen of fiction’ to edit the ‘narrative of fact’ in order to justify our choices, we will soon discover that the pen is in fact a pencil.”
Craig D. Lounsbrough

“Another thing your teachers didn't tell you is that one day, arguments over whether or not to capitalize the word internet would constitute half your workday and lead to severed ties with many people you once considered close friends and family.”
Emmy J. Favilla, A World Without "Whom": The Essential Guide to Language in the BuzzFeed Age

John McPhee
“Writers come in two principal categories -- those who are overtly insecure and those who are covertly insecure.”
John McPhee, Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process

“編輯是全方位工作者,文字能力是基本要求,溝通協調是家常便飯,更重要的是優雅解決問題的能力、笑著面對挑戰的勇氣!/有能力的話就買書吧!買書是對作者、對編輯、對所有出版從業人員最大的支持/其實你可以幫任何一本書寫導讀,只要你找得到它特出的地方/這是一份失敗了檢討自己,成功了榮耀歸於他人的工作,如果想要肯定一本書,或是身為在幕後的編輯拍拍,最好的方式就是把書買回家/現代人,特別是出版從業人員,如果沒有自嘲和自娛的能力,要怎麼在這險惡的冰河時期,維持健全的心靈呢?”
許喻理(Yuli), 編輯小姐Yuli的繪圖日誌:劇透職場,微厭世、不暗黑的辦公室直播漫畫

Gardner Dozois
“When I was learning the anthologist’s trade many years ago, sitting at the knees—metaphorically speaking, at least—of veteran anthologists like Damon Knight and Robert Silverberg, I was taught that you should always save your strongest and best story for last.”
Gardner Dozois, The Year's Best Science Fiction: First Annual Collection

Paul J. Silvia
“The goal of text generation is to throw confused, wide-eyed words on a page; the goal of text revision is to scrub the rods clean so that they sound nice and can go out in public.”
Paul J. Silvia, How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing

“Editing a written text is a collaborative enterprise that commences with the other parties commenting up the author’s initial ideas and it can include technical assistance in correction of grammatical mistakes, misspellings, poorly structured sentences, vague or inconsistent statements, and correcting errors in citations. Editing is as much as an art form as writing a creative piece of literature. A good editor is a trusted person whom instructs the writer to speak plainly and unabashedly informs the writer when they write absolute gibberish. Perhaps the most successful relationship between a writer and an editor is the storied relationship shared by Thomas Wolfe and his renowned editor, Maxwell Perkins. By all accounts, the prodigiously talented and mercurial Wolfe was hypersensitive to criticism. Perkins provided Wolfe with constant reassurance and substantially trimmed the text of his books. Before Perkins commenced line editing and proofreading Wolfe’s bestselling autobiography Look Homeward, Angel,’ the original manuscript exceeded 1,100 pages. In a letter to Maxwell Perkins, Thomas Wolfe declared that his goal when writing “Look Homeward, Angel,” was “to loot my life clean, if possible of every memory which a buried life and the thousand faces of forgotten time could awaken and to weave it into a … densely woven web.” After looting my own dormant memories by delving into the amorphous events that caused me to lose faith in the world and assembling the largely formless mulch into a narrative manuscript of dubious length, I understand why a writer wishes to thank many people for their assistance, advice, and support in publishing a book.”
Kilroy J. Oldster, Dead Toad Scrolls

“I have a confession. I'm a little OCD when I post on social media – I tend to edit more than I should. But then I started thinking, maybe we should all edit a little more - our posts, our thoughts, our words.”
Traci Lea LaRussa

“Sometimes beauty lies in what is ignored.
Sometimes beauty results from what is ignored.”
Khang Kijarro Nguyen

Curtis Tyrone Jones
“If it's not right, keep editing until it is. ~ Life”
Curtis Tyrone Jones

Neil Gaiman
“Once you’ve got to the end, and you know what happens, it’s your job to make it look like you knew exactly what you were doing all along”
Neil Gaiman