Drug War Quotes

Quotes tagged as "drug-war" Showing 1-25 of 25
Michelle Alexander
“The genius of the current caste system, and what most distinguishes it from its predecessors, is that it appears voluntary. People choose to commit crimes, and that's why they are locked up or locked out, we are told. This feature makes the politics of responsibility particularly tempting, as it appears the system can be avoided with good behavior. But herein lies the trap. All people make mistakes. All of us are sinners. All of us are criminals. All of us violate the law at some point in our lives. In fact, if the worst thing you have ever done is speed ten miles over the speed limit on the freeway, you have put yourself and others at more risk of harm than someone smoking marijuana in the privacy of his or her living room. Yet there are people in the United States serving life sentences for first-time drug offenses, something virtually unheard of anywhere else in the world.”
Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

Milton Friedman
“See, if you look at the drug war from a purely economic point of view, the role of the government is to protect the drug cartel. That's literally true.”
Milton Friedman

Alex E. Jones
“The drug war is a total scam, prescription drugs kill 300K a year, while marijuana kills no one, but they spend billions/year 'fighting' it, because pot heads make for good little slaves to put into private prisons, owned by the banks who launder the drug money, and it's ALL DOCUMENTED.”
Alex E. Jones

Michelle Alexander
“We could choose to be a nation that extends care, compassion, and concern to those who are locked up and locked out or headed for prison before they are old enough to vote. We could seek for them the same opportunities we seek for our own children; we could treat them like one of “us.” We could do that. Or we can choose to be a nation that shames and blames its most vulnerable, affixes badges of dishonor upon them at young ages, and then relegates them to a permanent second-class status for life. That is the path we have chosen, and it leads to a familiar place.”
Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

Johann Hari
“The opposite of addiction isn't sobriety. It's connection. It's all I can offer. It's all that will help [you] in the end. If you are alone, you cannot escape addiction. If you are loved, you have a chance. For a hundred years we have been singing war songs about addicts. All along, we should have been singing love songs to them.”
Johann Hari, Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs

Sebastian Marincolo
“A marijuana high can enhance core human mental abilities. It can help you to focus, to remember, to see new patterns, to imagine, to be creative, to introspect, to empathically understand others, and to come to deep insights. If you don’t find this amazing you have lost your sense of wonder. Which, by the way, is something a high can bring back, too.”
Sebastian Marincolo

Enock Maregesi
“Kujiingiza katika madawa ni matokeo ya maisha. Hatutumii madawa ya kulevya. Madawa ya kulevya ni sisi wenyewe; tunahitaji kusaidiwa.”
Enock Maregesi

Johann Hari
“Ethan Nadelmann, one of the leading drug reformers in the United States, had explained: "People overdose because [under prohibition] they don't know if the heroin is 1 percent or 40 percent...Just imagine if every time you picked up a bottle of wine, you didn't know whether it was 8 percent alcohol or 80 percent alcohol [or] if every time you took an aspirin, you didn't know if it was 5 milligrams or 500 milligrams.”
Johann Hari, Chasing the Scream: The First and Last Days of the War on Drugs

Sabina Berman
“Mexico has made a mistake. Alone, it fights a war against a global phenomenon that only matters to a few. That makes the headlines in every case because of its unusual cruelty.”
Sabina Berman

Shannon A. Thompson
“Instead of a criminal or a drug addict, I was looking at a boy—just a boy.”
Shannon A. Thompson, Take Me Tomorrow

“It's the causes, not the dependent person, that must be corrected. That's why I see the United States' War on Drugs as being fought in an unrealistic manner. This war is focused on fighting drug dealers and the use of drugs here and abroad, when the effort should be primarily aimed at treating and curing that causes that compel people to reach for drugs.”
Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure

Dominic Milton Trott
“People are dying because of ignorance. They are dying because unremitting propaganda is denying them essential safety information. They are dying because legislators and the media are censoring the science, and are ruthlessly pushing an ideological agenda instead. They are dying because the first casualty of war is truth, and the war on drugs is no different.”
Dominic Milton Trott, The Honest Drug Book: A Chemical & Botanical Journey Through The Legal High Years

Angelica Hopes
“From my keen observation, it is a very sad fact that the Philippines’ current administration's drug war crisis has fully pressed the pedal of acceleration to more division, hatred, cycles of violence (copycat killings, summary killings, extra judicial killings, collateral victims of drug war), toxic revenge, and perpetual impunity. ~ Angelica Hopes, reflections on Drug War in the Philippines”
Angelica Hopes

Sergio Troncoso
“So the Juárez/El Paso area before the recent drug violence was not a bilingual, bi-national, bicultural Zion, but it was one world. One entity. One place. One city where you could live in between worlds, and have the hope of creating something new. A third way to be, not along the border, but on the border.

That is what the violence has destroyed, that unity, however tenuous it ever was. It has destroyed the idea of that unity and the reality of living so uniquely astride an international border. This ‘real idea’ was always a work-in-progress, and for the moment it is lost. Yet that real idea of unity had great value.”
Sergio Troncoso, Our Lost Border: Essays on Life Amid the Narco-Violence

John Gibler
“The world of global drug production, shipping distribution, sales, and consumption is too complex, however, to be understood in any single us-and-them story.”
John Gibler

Magnus Linton
“The story is complicated and contradictory. Sometimes this proclaimed ‘war on drugs’ has followed shifts in military threats; at times it is coloured by religious paranoia; often it is rooted in genuine fear of widespread social misery. But mostly, and sometimes quite unintentionally, it is the result of political strategies that have very little to do with its expressed goal of fighting drugs.”
Magnus Linton

Radley Balko
“Turner [Reagan's "drug czar'] was especially determined to purge psychiatrists from federal drug agencies. "They're trained to treat," he said, "and treatment isn't what we do." Methadone was out, so Turner blocked advocates of the treatment who were still in the federal government from speaking about it publicly.”
Radley Balko, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America's Police Forces

Melissa del Bosque
“All around him, life carried on as usual on the American side of the river. The region was already seven years into the drug war, and it had all taken on a surreal normality. A block away from where he’d parked his squad car, people went about their shopping in the downtown stores, while Mexicans—some of them innocent bystanders—died in the city across the river.”
Melissa del Bosque, Bloodlines: The True Story of a Drug Cartel, the FBI, and the Battle for a Horse-Racing Dynasty

Magnus Linton
“Drugs flow as effortlessly through the harbour as through los esteros, but the government and the DEA view drug trafficking as more of a hazard to society when it moves through the poor area, with its dirty waters and seeming chaos, than when it has to do with corporate boardrooms and the main harbour. And for the FARC, it is becoming easier and easier to convince the city’s Afro-Colombian majority that the focus of the war on drugs is not primarily on the flow of drugs, but on what kind of people are involved in it.”
Magnus Linton, Cocaína: A Book on Those Who Make It

Melissa del Bosque
“Those who felt no remorse after the slaughter were enlisted to be Miguel’s personal bodyguards or soldiers for the front line. They accepted that their lives would be brief and violent. It was a pact made with the devil for money and to feel, for once, what it was like to have power.”
Melissa del Bosque, Bloodlines: The True Story of a Drug Cartel, the FBI, and the Battle for a Horse-Racing Dynasty

“We wouldn't have much need of a war if people stopped using drugs. It's like taking up a fight against the use of headache remedies; it will never work until the condition causing people's headache pain is healed.”
Chris Prentiss, The Alcoholism and Addiction Cure

Enock Maregesi
“Kushinda vita ya madawa ya kulevya lazima uijue jiografia ya madawa ya kulevya.”
Enock Maregesi

Dominic Milton Trott
“The drug education currently provided broadly amounts to ‘take drugs and you will die’. This lie is so obvious that no-one takes it seriously.”
Dominic Milton Trott, The Honest Drug Book: A Chemical & Botanical Journey Through The Legal High Years

Johann Hari
“It would be as if the Navy Seals defected from the U.S. Army to help the Crips take over Los Angeles--and succeeded.”
Johann Hari

“The story of the War on Drugs is a story of the law of unintended consequences.”
Neil Woods, Drug Wars: The terrifying inside story of Britain’s drug trade