Quotes About Depression

Quotes tagged as "depression" (showing 241-270 of 2,702)
Andrew Solomon
“Grief is depression in proportion to circumstance; depression is grief out of proportion to circumstance.”
Andrew Solomon, The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression

Elizabeth Wurtzel
“It's nonverbal: I need love. I need the thing that happens when your brain shuts off and your heart turns on. And I know it's around me somewhere, but I just can't feel it.”
Elizabeth Wurtzel, Prozac Nation

Jennifer Elisabeth
“For so many years, I couldn’t understand why every time I thought that someone finally loved me, like… for real, they would eventually turn to vapor. Every person whom I’ve ever loved is trapped inside of my chest. I’ve breathed all of them in so deeply that I’ve nearly choked and died on every soul that I’ve ever given myself to.”
Jennifer Elisabeth, Born Ready: Unleash Your Inner Dream Girl

“Depression is not sobbing and crying and giving vent, it is plain and simple reduction of feeling.”
Judith Guest

“When the black thing was at its worst, when the illicit cocktails and the ten-mile runs stopped working, I would feel numb as if dead to the world. I moved unconsciously, with heavy limbs, like a zombie from a horror film. I felt a pain so fierce and persistent deep inside me, I was tempted to take the chopping knife in the kitchen and cut the black thing out I would lie on my bed staring at the ceiling thinking about that knife and using all my limited powers of self-control to stop myself from going downstairs to get it.”
Alice Jamieson, Today I'm Alice: Nine Personalities, One Tortured Mind

Kay Redfield Jamison
“Somehow, like so many people who get depressed, we felt our depressions were more complicated and existentially based than they actually were.”
Kay Redfield Jamison, An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness

Sapphire
“Depression is anger turned inward.”
Sapphire, Push

G.K. Chesterton
“The modern philosopher had told me again and again that I was in the right place, and I still felt depressed even in acquiescence. But I had heard that I was in the wrong place, and my soul sang for joy like a bird in spring.”
G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy

Jasmine Warga
“I spend a lot of time wondering what dying feels like. What dying sounds like. If I’ll burst like those notes, let out my last cries of pain, and then go silent forever. Or maybe I’ll turn into a shadowy static that’s barely there, if you just listen hard enough.”
Jasmine Warga, My Heart and Other Black Holes

Sylvia Plath
“I told Doreen I would not go to the show or the luncheon or the film premiere, but that I would not go to Coney Island either, I would stay in bed. Then I wondered why I couldn't go the whole way doing what I should any more. This made me sad and tired. Then I wondered why I couldn't go the whole way doing what I shouldn't, the way Doreen did, and this made me even sadder and more tired.”
Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

Lydia Davis
“If you think of something, do it.

Plenty of people often think, “I’d like to do this, or that.”
Lydia Davis

“Most people who think they're happy are really just stupid.”
Tom Kitt, Next to Normal

J.D. Salinger
“If you can't, or won't, think of Seymour, then you go right ahead and call in some ignorant psychoanalyst. You just do that. You just call in some analyst who's experienced in adjusting people to the joys of television, and Life magazine every Wednesday, and European travel, and the H-bomb, and Presidential elections, and the front page of the Times, and God knows what else that's gloriously normal.”
J.D. Salinger, Franny and Zooey

Henry David Thoreau
“He who hears the rippling of rivers in these degenerate days will not utterly despair.”
Henry David Thoreau

Nina LaCour
“He wipes tears off my face and then snot. He uses his hands. He loves me that much.”
Nina LaCour, Hold Still

Tabitha Suzuma
“They say that depression makes you see everything in a negative light. I disagree. It makes you see things for what they are. It makes you take off the fucking rose-tinted glasses and look around and see the world as it really is- cruel, harsh and unfair. It makes you see people in their true colours- stupid, shallow and self-absorbed. All that ridiculous optimism, all that carpe diem and life-is-what-you-make-of-it. Words, jsut empty words in an attempt to give meaning to an existence taht is both doomed and futile.”
Tabitha Suzuma, A Voice in the Distance

Frank Herbert
“Any man who retreats into a cave which has only one opening deserves to die.”
Frank Herbert, Dune

Daniel Willey
“I can’t think of anything more disheartening than living a life without a clear purpose.”
Daniel Willey

Jane Smiley
“I was depressed, but that was a side issue. This was more like closing up shop, or, say, having a big garage sale, where you look at everything you've bought in your life, and you remember how much it meant to you, and now you just tag it for a quarter and watch 'em carry it off, and you don't care. That's more like how it was.”
Jane Smiley, A Thousand Acres

Walter M. Miller Jr.
“When you tire of living, change itself seems evil, does it not? for then any change at all disturbs the deathlike peace of the life-weary.”
Walter M. Miller Jr., A Canticle for Leibowitz

Elizabeth Wurtzel
“And she keeps saying, how can you do this to me?

And i want to scream, what do you mean, how can I do this to you? Aren't we confusing our pronouns here? The question, really, is How could I do this to myself?”
Elizabeth Wurtzel, Prozac Nation

Susan Sontag
“Dissimulation, secretiveness, appear a necessity to the melancholic. He has complex, often veiled relations with others. These feelings of superiority, of inadequacy, of baffled feeling, of not being able to get what one wants, or even name it properly (or consistently) to oneself — these can be, it is felt they ought to be, masked by friendliness, or the most scrupulous manipulation.”
Susan Sontag, Under the Sign of Saturn: Essays

William Styron
“When I was first aware that I had been laid low by the disease, I felt a need, among other things, to register a strong protest against the word "depression." Depression, most people know, used to be termed "melancholia," a word which appears in English as the year 1303 and crops up more than once in Chaucer, who in his usage seemed to be aware of its pathological nuances. "Melancholia" would still appear to be a far more apt and evocative word for the blacker forms of the disorder, but it was usurped by a noun with a blank tonality and lacking any magisterial presence, used indifferently to describe an economic decline or a rut in the ground, a true wimp of a word for such a major illness.

It may be that the scientist generally held responsible for its currency in modern times, a Johns Hopkins Medical School faculty member justly venerated -- the Swiss-born psychiatrist Adolf Meyer -- had a tin ear for the finer rhythms of English and therefore was unaware of the semantic damage he had inflicted for such a dreadful and raging disease. Nonetheless, for over seventy-five years the word has slithered innocuously through the language like a slug, leaving little trace of its intrinsic malevolence and preventing, by its insipidity, a general awareness of the horrible intensity of the disease when out of control.”
William Styron, Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness

Jenny Downham
“It's as if a child with a brush and too much enthusiasm has been set free with a tin of black paint inside me.”
Jenny Downham, Before I Die

“At times it may seem as though you and your past are one. Sometimes we fail to differentiate between what has happened to us and who we are today. If you have a hard time getting beyond that damaging mind-set let me encourage you right now. You are not your past Although you are changed and shaped by past experiences who you were yesterday does not control the person you have the potential to become tomorrow.”
Sue Augustine, When Your Past Is Hurting Your Present: Getting Beyond Fears That Hold You Back

Hippocrates
“If you are in a bad mood go for a walk.If you are still in a bad mood go for another walk.”
Hippocrates

Matt Haig
“MINDS ARE UNIQUE. They go wrong in unique ways. My mind went wrong in a slightly different way to how other minds go wrong. Our experience overlaps with other people's, but it is never exactly the same experience.”
Matt Haig, Reasons to Stay Alive

“We are not easy to help. Nor are we easy to be around. Nobody with a serious illness is easy to be around. Although not obviously physically disabled, we struggle to get things done. Our energy levels are dangerously low. Sometimes, we find it hard to talk. We get angry and frustrated. We fall into despair. We cry, for no apparent reason. Sometimes we find it difficult to eat, or to sleep. Often, we have to go to bed in the afternoon or all day.
So do most people with a serious illness. We are no different.”
Sally Brampton, Shoot the Damn Dog: A Memoir of Depression

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