Dagny Taggart Quotes

Quotes tagged as "dagny-taggart" (showing 1-30 of 104)
Ayn Rand
“You will follow me, if we are what we are, you and I, if we live, if the world exists, if you know the meaning of this moment and can't let it slip by, as others let it slip, into the senselessness of the unwilled and unreached.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“They said you were hard and cold and unfeeling.”
“But it’s true...I am, in the sense they mean—only have they ever told you in just what sense they mean it?"
"What did they mean about you?”
“Whenever anyone accuses some person of being ‘unfeeling,’ he means that that person is just. He means that that person has no causeless emotions and will not grant him a feeling which he does not deserve. He means that .‘to feel’ is to go against reason, against moral values, against reality.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“We are those who do not disconnect the values of their minds from the actions of their bodies, those who do not leave their values to empty dreams, but bring them into existence, those who give material form to thoughts, and reality to values.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“It was new to feel protected, and to feel that it was right to accept the protection, to surrender - right, because this peculiar sense of safety was...not the protection of being spared from battle, but of having won it, not a protection granted to her weakness, but to her strength....”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“Whenever anyone accuses some person of being ‘unfeeling,’ he means that that person is just. He means that that person has no causeless emotions and will not grant him a feeling which he does not deserve. He means that .‘to feel’ is to go against reason, against moral values, against reality.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“A face that bore no mark of pain or fear or guilt...The shape of his mouth was pride, and more: it was as if he took pride in being proud. The angular planes of his cheeks made her think of arrogance, of tension, of scorn—yet the face had none of these qualities, it had their final sum: a look of serene determination and of certainty, and the look of a ruthless innocence which would not seek forgiveness or grant it. It was a face that had nothing to hide or to escape, a face with no fear of being seen or of seeing, so that the first thing she grasped about him was the intense perceptiveness of his eyes—he looked as if his faculty of sight were his best-loved tool and its exercise were a limitless, joyous adventure, as if his eyes imparted a superlative value to himself and to the world—to himself for his ability to see, to the world for being a place so eagerly worth seeing. It seemed to her for a moment that she was in the presence of a being who was pure consciousness—yet she had never been so aware of a man’s body.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“You don’t have to see through the eyes of others, hold onto yours, stand on your own judgment, you know that what is, is—say it aloud, like the holiest of prayers, and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“No action could be lower or more futile than for one person to throw upon another the burden of his abdication of choice.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“Incredulity and indifference were her only reaction: incredulity, because she could not conceive of what would bring human beings to such a state —indifference, because she could not regard those who reached it, as human any longer.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“This was men’s moral code in the outer world, a code that told them to act on the premise of one another’s weakness, deceit and stupidity, and this was the pattern of their lives, this struggle through a fog of the pretended and unacknowledged, this belief that facts are not solid or final, this state where, denying any form to reality, men stumble through life, unreal and unformed, and die having never been born.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“She had caught the sound of suffering in the faintest exaggeration of evenness in his voice.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“It seemed natural; natural to the moment’s peculiar reality that was sharply clear, but cut off from everything, immediate, but disconnected, like a bright island in a wall of fog, the heightened, unquestioning reality one feels when one is drunk.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“There was an air of luxury about the room, but it was the luxury of expert simplicity.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“It was as if he were a single whole, grasped by her first glance at him, like some irreducible absolute, like an axiom not to be explained any further, as if she knew everything about him by direct perception, and what awaited her now was only the process of identifying her knowledge.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“She thought of the world’s code that worshipped white lies as an act of mercy—she felt a stab of revulsion against that code..”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“Aren’t you training a man who could become your most dangerous competitor?”
“That’s the only sort of men I like to hire. Dagny, have you lived too long among the looters? Have you come to think that one man’s ability is a threat to another?”
“Oh no! But I thought I was almost the only one left who didn’t think that.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“She heard the words; she understood the meaning; she was unable to make it real—to grant the respect of anger, concern, opposition to a nightmare piece of insanity that rested on nothing but people’s willingness to pretend to believe that it was sane.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“He was searching for words to name his meaning without naming it, she thought, to make her understand that which he did not want to be understood.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“She noted that the sense of detachment one feels when looking at the earth from a plane was the same sense she felt when looking at people: only her distance from people seemed longer.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“His face gave her nothing in answer: it had that look of respectful severity with which a man stands before the fact that the truth is the truth.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“She marveled at the futility of his method: he was acting as if, by naming her opinion in advance, he would make her unable to alter it.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“No battle was hard, no decision was dangerous where there was no soggy uncertainty, no shapeless evasion to encounter.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“There was so calm, so natural, so total a certainty in the sound of her voice that the mere sound seemed to carry an immense persuasiveness.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“She wondered at the joyous, proud comfort to be found in a sense of the finite, in the knowledge that the field of one’s concern lay within the realm of one’s sight.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“She felt an odd, light-hearted indifference, as if she suddenly wanted nothing but the comfort of surrendering to helplessness.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“It was a sudden, stunned state of quiet drunkenness, complete in itself, their hair mingled like the rays of two bodies in space that had achieved their meeting, she saw that he walked with his eyes closed, as if even sight would now be an intrusion.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“She sat beside him in the car, feeling no desire to speak, knowing that neither of them could conceal the meaning of their silence.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“I’m not going to help you pretend—by arguing with you—that the reality you’re talking about is not what it is, that there’s still a way to make it work and to save your neck. There isn’t.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“They seemed to want her approval, without having to know whether she approved or not.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

Ayn Rand
“...a tall, fragile woman with pale blond hair and a face of such beauty that it seemed veiled by distance, as if the artist had been merely able to suggest it, not to make it quite real...she was Kay Ludlow, the movie star who, once seen, could never be forgotten; the star who had retired and vanished five years ago, to be replaced by girls of indistinguishable names and interchangeable faces...she felt that the glass cafeteria was a cleaner use for Kay Ludlow’s beauty than a role in a picture glorifying the commonplace for possessing no glory.”
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged

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