D H Lawrence Quotes

Quotes tagged as "d-h-lawrence" Showing 1-30 of 56
D.H. Lawrence
“For my part, I prefer my heart to be broken. It is so lovely, dawn-kaleidoscopic within the crack.”
D.H. Lawrence

D.H. Lawrence
“It's terrible, once you've got a man into your blood!" she said.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“The world is a raving idiot, and no man can kill it: though I’ll do my best. But you’re right. We must rescue ourselves as best we can.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“What liars poets and everybody were! They made one think one wanted sentiment. When what one supremely wanted was this piercing, consuming, rather awful sensuality.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“A man could no longer be private and withdrawn. The world allows no hermits.”
D.H. Lawrence

D.H. Lawrence
“Sex and a cocktail: they both lasted about as long, had the same effect, and amounted to about the same thing.”
D. H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“Destroy! destroy! destroy! hums the under-consciousness. Love and produce! Love and produce! cackles the upper consciousness. And the world hears only the Love-and- produce cackle. Refuses to hear the hum of destruction under- neath. Until such time as it will have to hear.”
D.H. Lawrence

D.H. Lawrence
“And she shrank away again, back into her darkness, and for a long while remained blotted safely away from living.”
D.H. Lawrence, The Rainbow

D.H. Lawrence
“It's no good trying to get rid of your aloneness. You've got to stick to it all your life. Only at times, at times, the gap will be filled in. At times! But you have to wait for the times. Accept your aloneness and stick to it, all your life. And then accept the times when the gap is filled in, when they come. But they've got to come. You can't force them.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“He doesn't have feelings, he only has streams of words about feelings.”
D.H. Lawrence

D.H. Lawrence
“But his dread was the nights when he could not sleep. Then it was awful indeed, when annihilation pressed in on him on every side. Then it was ghastly, to exist without having any life: lifeless, in the night, to exist.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“He went down again into the darkness and seclusion of the wood. But he knew that the seclusion of the wood was illusory. The industrial noises broke the solitude, the sharp lights, though unseen, mocked it. A man could no longer be private and withdrawn. The world allows no hermits.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“He had reached the point where all he wanted on earth was to be alone.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“Little gusts of sunshine blew, strangely bright, and lit up the celandines at the wood's edge, under the hazel-rods, they spangled out bright and yellow. And the wood was still, stiller, but yet gusty with crossing sun. The first windflowers were out, and all the wood seemed pale with the pallor of endless little anemones, sprinkling the shaken floor. 'The world has grown pale with thy breath.' But it was the breath of Persephone, this time; she came out of hell on a cold morning. Cold breaths of wind came, and overhead there was an anger of entangled wind caught among the twigs. It, too, was caught and trying to tear itself free, the wind, like Absalom. How cold the anemones looked, bobbing their naked white shoulders over crinoline skirts of green. But they stood it. A few first bleached little primroses too, by the path, and yellow buds unfolding themselves.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“And he could go on in life, existing from day to day, without connection and without hope. For he did not know what to do with himself.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“A terrible hollow seemed to menace him somewhere, somehow, a void, and into this void his energy would collapse. Energyless, he felt at times he was dead, really dead.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“But he was quite consciously afraid of society, which he knew by instinct to be a malevolent, partly insane beast.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“She rose slowly. She didn't want to go. She also rather resented staying.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“He felt that if he could not be alone, and if he could not be left alone, he would die.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“She felt weak and utterly forlorn. She wished some help would come from outside. But in the whole world there was no help.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“She was old; millions of years old, she felt. And at last, she could bear the burden of herself no more.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“He would be alone, and apart from life, which was all he wanted.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“Always these arrangements! Always one's life arranged for one! Wheels that worked one and drove one, and over which one had no real control!”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“It all had to be squeezed and squeezed again, to provide a thrill, to provide enjoyment. What did people mean, with their simply determined enjoying of themselves?”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“I'd rather be at Wragby, where I can go about and be still, and not stare at anything or do any performing of any sort. This tourist performance of enjoying oneself is too hopelessly humiliating: it's such a failure.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“There's so much of you here with me, really, that it's a pity you aren't all here.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

“The world is supposed to be full of possibilities, but they narrow down to pretty few in most personal experience.”
David Herbert Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“And how they take one in, with their manners and their mock wistfulness and gentleness.”
D.H. Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

D.H. Lawrence
“Far be it from me to suggest that all women should go running after gamekeepers for lovers.”
D.H. Lawrence

“If there’s got to be a future for humanity, there’ll have to be a very big change from what now is.”
David Herbert Lawrence, Lady Chatterley's Lover

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