Corporate Greed Quotes

Quotes tagged as "corporate-greed" Showing 1-30 of 70
Eric Schlosser
“The history of the twentieth century was dominated by the struggle against totalitarian systems of state power. The twenty-first will no doubt be marked by a struggle to curtail excessive corporate power.”
Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal

Andrew Vachss
“In my world, people are always plotting. You
have no idea of all the crimes people in business commit every
day. Like it was nothing. Or there’s a set of special rules for them.
Remember when Bush made that whole speech about ‘corporate
ethics’ last year? What a fraud. You think stuff like Enron or
WorldCom is an aberration? It’s only the tip. Business is a religion.
Probably the only one practiced all over the world.”
Andrew Vachss, Down Here

Jess C. Scott
“He knows how to market himself well. Nowadays, that's all that seems to count. He's rebellious in a way that appeals to people with vain, shallow taste. So of course he manipulates his audiences with the blessing of his recording company and the financial investors behind his brand.”
Jess C. Scott, Sven

Barbara Ehrenreich
“Then, in the 1980's, came the paroxysm of downsizing, and the very nature of the corporation was thrown into doubt. In what began almost as a fad and quickly matured into an unshakable habit, companies were 'restructuring,' 'reengineering,' and generally cutting as many jobs as possible, white collar as well as blue . . . The New York Times captured the new corporate order succintly in 1987, reporting that it 'eschews loyalty to workers, products, corporate structures, businesses, factories, communities, even the nation. All such allegiances are viewed as expendable under the new rules. With survival at stake, only market leadership, strong profits and a high stock price can be allowed to matter'.”
Barbara Ehrenreich, Bright-Sided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America

Clifford D. Simak
“You still could go to some industry or some university or the government and if you could persuade them you had something on the ball—why, then, they might put up the cash after cutting themselves in on just about all of the profits. And, naturally, they'd run the show because it was their money and all you had done was the sweating and the bleeding.”
Clifford D. Simak, All the Traps of Earth

“Capitalism is a social system owned by the capitalistic class, a small network of very wealthy and powerful businessmen, who compromise the health and security of the general population for corporate gain.”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

“A system is corrupt when it is strictly profit-driven, not driven to serve the best interests of its people, but those of multinational corporations.”
Suzy Kassem, Rise Up and Salute the Sun: The Writings of Suzy Kassem

Shannon L. Alder
“When the greedy executives of rich religions go before Him, they will say, "Remember me for who I was." And God will answer, "I do remember but you have forgotten who you use to be.”
Shannon Alder

“Koch's youthful idealism about libertarianism had largely devolved into a rationale for corporate self-interest.”
John Charles Chasteen, Born in Blood and Fire: A Concise History of Latin America

Quentin R. Bufogle
“If you're a CEO of Big Pharma who raises the price of a life-saving drug 600%, it's not competition you lack, it's a conscience. It's not poorly lit alleyways that are responsible for rape -- it's rapists. Let's address the real problem: CORPORATE GREED.”
Quentin R. Bufogle, Horse Latitudes

Quentin R. Bufogle
“If there's no honor among thieves, only a colossal idiot (or fellow thief) would suggest using the honor system to regulate big banks and corporations.”
Quentin R. Bufogle, Horse Latitudes

Louis Yako
“Isn't it quite ironic that we may be coming to a day when we may find all kinds of full-time, steady and secure jobs at universities for all, except jobs for educators?”
Louis Yako

Louis Yako
“Given the current pace of its corporatization, academia may well become the worst institution for indoctrinating and subjugating many brilliant minds that may otherwise have great potential for dissidence and creating a new worldview, which is much needed amid the global turmoil we are experiencing internationally.”
Louis Yako

Louis Yako
“It is perhaps a form of disillusionment similar to that experienced in many Eastern European countries the moment many people realized that they have lost whatever benefits they had under the former communist regimes without winning anything in return under the draconian, capitalist EU system of exploitation.”
Louis Yako

Louis Yako
“While an extreme and violent case, Bullets in Envelopes shows that the conditions of Iraqi academics in exile are part and parcel of global trends marked by the commercialization and corporatization of higher education adversely affecting academic, social, and political freedoms of writing, thinking, and speaking truth to power. As such, countries and societies are being totally reshaped (and destroyed) in alarming ways. Bullets in Envelopes is about academics, but it’s not written for academics only. The stories in the book prove that the Iraq war is far from over. Instead, it has been happening over and over in other countries too.”
Louis Yako, Bullets in Envelopes: Iraqi Academics in Exile

Louis Yako
“The first problem the corporate culture of customer service creates is humans who are like time bombs ready to explode at any moment. It creates people with double or multiple standards, who say what they do not mean and mean what they do not say. People who hate having to act 'nice' eight hours a day, when they really do not want to.”
Louis Yako

Louis Yako
“It should make us take seriously the consequences of a culture in which openness and acceptance are nothing more than part of the job description that some people despise and leave behind like a worn-out shirt once they leave work.”
Louis Yako

Louis Yako
“[T]he corporate customer service culture we currently have in place is neither about customers nor about those serving them. It is primarily geared to serve the pockets of those at the top of the corporate ladder.”
Louis Yako

Louis Yako
“The third serious problem the culture of customer service as we know it creates is turning every profession into a customer service tool to generate profits. In doing so, we risk the loss of creativity, quality, and critical thinking in many walks of life. Nowhere is this risk clearer and more damaging than viewing students at different educational institutions as customers, and nowhere this trend has been happening more rapidly than at schools, colleges, and universities, especially at private institutions. There is severe damage done to creativity and critical thinking when all students want is an A, and in fact feel entitled to get it since they (or their parents) are paying hundreds of thousands of dollars to attend elite schools. Many educators are under enormous pressure to give students grades they do not deserve in order to avoid receiving bad student evaluations (or to ensure getting good ones). This pressure is intensifying as academic jobs become increasingly contingent and precarious, where teaching staff are hired under short contracts only renewed based on so-called ‘performance,’ which is often measured by student evaluations and enrollment. When this happens, academic and intellectual compromises and corruption increase. Colleagues at elite American universities have been pressured to give students grades no lower than a B, with the explanation that this is what is ‘expected.’ Rampant grade inflation is unethical and unacceptable. Unfortunately, when graduate instructors resist professors’ instructions to fix grades by grading according to independent criteria of intellectual merit, they may be verbally chastised or worse, fired. This humiliation not only reinforces the norm of inflating grades, it also bolsters the power of the tenured professors who instruct their teaching assistants to do it.”
Louis Yako

Louis Yako
“[T]he current system in place evaluates us less as citizens and more as customers or consumers. This is applicable even in foreign policies in the sense that the US foreign policy supports or attacks other countries not based on their values and methods of governance but based on whether these nations allow or block America’s corporate interests on their territories. This perhaps explains why the US supports some of the most undemocratic regimes (customers) and destroys and bombs other secular and diverse nations that do not allow mega malls, McDonald’s, Pepsi, Coca Cola, Amazon, you name it, to plunder their lands and populations.”
Louis Yako

Louis Yako
“If we pay attention, it becomes clear that many people have already internalized seeing themselves as ‘customers’. For example, when some express their discontent with any government or corporate policies or services, they often demand changes as ‘taxpayers’ rather than as citizens. Is it implied in this language that those who do not (or cannot) pay taxes, albeit temporarily, have no rights to object as citizens? Is this why poor neighborhoods in America are usually run down and unsafe? If so, we must be careful about accepting this reality, because each one of us at any given point in our lives may be in a place where we may not be deemed as worthy consumers or taxpayers by the system. Seeing oneself as a customer is more about one’s income and payment to exist in the system than it is about their basic human rights or even their real value.”
Louis Yako

Louis Yako
“[W]e are asked to present or use our bank cards, gym cards, grocery store cards, work ID, and so on, a lot more than we use our state or government IDs. We rarely use our State IDs, unless we are in trouble or to prove that we are ‘legal’ or entitled to some meager benefits. Our existence in the system is measured by many different cards issued by corporate America. As a result, as soon as any card expires, you are denied entrance into places. You are valid only for as long as the expiration date on your credit card, the money you have in your bank account, or the expiration date of your gym membership/card. You become invisible in the society once your cards expire. You are nobody when you can no longer afford to renew your memberships of all these expensive corporate cards.”
Louis Yako

Ravindra Shukla
“It does not matter how great the idea is (for these IPOs), they cannot be valued simply in billions. For that matter, no skill is worth billions. Look at the contrast here –Four hundred million for chucking somebody out and on the other side people losing their life savings at the age of 60 years? Where do you draw the line?
Look at the gap.”
Ravindra Shukla, A Maverick Heart: Between Love and Life

Louis Yako
“For decades, the exploitative capitalist system and neoliberalism have been trying to persuade the world that it is for our best interest to reduce (or even erase) the public sector and give more power to the greedy private sector. They have been pushing -with great success – for the privatization of every service that can benefit the poor and marginalized people. They have and still are trying to get rid of universal healthcare anywhere their hands can reach. Why do they do so? The answer is simpler than we think: it is to keep people at the mercy of the greedy capitalist system that sees individuals as either potential cheap laborers to benefit from or a burden to dispose of when no longer usable. This global pandemic should be a wake-up call to all of us about how duped the world has been all along by this narrative. How many more disasters and pandemics will it take for the world to wake up?”
Louis Yako

Louis Yako
“There were endless bodies of passengers wearing different colors of clothes, carrying handbags, and electronic devices of different sizes and shapes, giving them the illusive feeling of uniqueness, but probably made by a handful of corporations.”
Louis Yako

Abhijit Naskar
“The attention of a company must be on the welfare of its consumers, not on draining their wallets.”
Abhijit Naskar, Mucize Insan: When The World is Family

Abhijit Naskar
“Purpose driven technology will continue to flourish, whereas profit driven technology will either perish or destroy the world.”
Abhijit Naskar, Mucize Insan: When The World is Family

Abhijit Naskar
“Apple doesn’t care about privacy. All it cares about is privacy for the privileged.”
Abhijit Naskar, Mucize Insan: When The World is Family

Abhijit Naskar
“Why do you think Apple can become the first trillion dollar company in history, not because they can innovate, but because they can abuse the shallowness and vanity of the masses.”
Abhijit Naskar, Hometown Human: To Live for Soil and Society

“We liberals and progressives need to do a better job at verbalizing what we are for, and not just what we are against. If we want a public option, we must make the case for it. Every time the Republicans start talking about the corruption, waste, and negligence of “Big Government,” we should talk about those same qualities in Big Corporations. If we want to end factory farming, decrease income inequality, and end discrimination in all its insidious forms, we must fight for those things and so much more. It is a subtle but important difference to stand for equality rather than to merely stand against inequality, and I believe that within this positive framework, more transformative arguments can be made.”
Michael Bihovsky

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