Cooperation Quotes

Quotes tagged as "cooperation" Showing 31-60 of 132
Ogwo David Emenike
“Synergy without strategy results to waste of energy.”
Ogwo David Emenike

Desmond Morris
“The news that is brought to us is nearly always bad news, but for every act of violence or destruction that occurs there are a million acts of peaceful friendliness.”
Desmond Morris, The Naked Ape: A Zoologist's Study of the Human Animal

L.R. Knost
“Don’t forget to bring your funny bone along on your parenting journey. Humor is a universal language that topples walls, connects hearts, and opens the door to communication and cooperation.”
L.R. Knost

Ijeoma Oluo
“Find areas of the movement for equality with which you feel confident that the main goal is equality and within which you do not feel you are violating your principles. Do work there and where that work coincides with the work of others, join hands.”
Ijeoma Oluo, So You Want to Talk About Race

T.K. Naliaka
“Raising awareness versus raising alarm;
the public can't be better informed if the information isn't better.”
T.K. Naliaka

Amit Kalantri
“When only one party makes a profit that's robbery when all parties make profit that's business.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

Albert-László Barabási
“The Fourth Law: While team success requires diversity and balance, a single individual will receive credit for the group’s achievements.”
Albert-László Barabási, The Formula: The Universal Laws of Success

“If You Respect Their Preparation,
You never Drop the Baton”
Vineet Raj Kapoor

Yuval Noah Harari
“Such threats and promises often succeed in creating stable human hierarchies and mass-cooperation networks, as long as people believe that they reflect the inevitable laws of nature or the divine commands of God, rather than just human whims. All large-scale human cooperation is ultimately based on our belief in imagined orders. These are sets of rules that, despite existing only in our imagination, we believe to be as real and inviolable as gravity. ‘If you sacrifice ten bulls to the sky god, the rain will come; if you honour your parents, you will go to heaven; and if you don’t believe what I am telling you – you’ll go to hell.’ As long as all Sapiens living in a particular locality believe in the same stories, they all follow the same rules, making it easy to predict the behaviour of strangers and to organise mass-cooperation networks. Sapiens often use visual marks such as a turban, a beard or a business suit to signal ‘you can trust me, I believe in the same story as you’. Our chimpanzee cousins cannot invent and spread such stories, which is why they cannot cooperate in large numbers.”
Yuval Noah Harari, Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow

Tyler Cowen
“It is often a puzzle for foreigners why the United States has such a dismal performance when it comes to murder, guns, and mental illness, all features of American life that, when compared to most of the other wealthy countries, are so awful they do not require further documentation. You might wonder how those bad results square with America’s relatively strong performances on most social capital indices, such as trust, cooperation, and charitable philanthropy; on philanthropy, we even rate as the global number one. The truth is that those positive and negative facets are two sides of the same coin: Cooperation is very often furthered by segregating those who do not fit in. That creates some superclusters of cooperation among the quality cooperators and a fair amount of chaos and dysfunctionality elsewhere.”
Tyler Cowen, The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream

bell hooks
“Unfortunately it is often easier to ignore, dismiss, reject, and even hurt one another rather than engage in constructive confrontation.”
Bell hooks, Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center

Jason Medina
“Let’s learn to play nice, so we can get out of here, together. I don’t have the patience to baby-sit you guys.”
Jason Medina, The Manhattanville Incident: An Undead Novel

Théun Mares
“There is a vast difference between academic thought and intelligence. Academic thought can only function within the context of separativeness, whilst intelligence is a spontaneous co-operation with the fundamental wholeness that is inherent within the process of life.”
Théun Mares, Cry of the Eagle: The Toltec Teachings – Volume 2

Yuval Noah Harari
“Large numbers of strangers can cooperate successfully by believing in common myth.”
Yuval Noah Harari, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind

L.R. Knost
“Peaceful parenting is not permissive. It is not lazy. It is not idealistic. Peaceful parenting is thoughtful, gentle guidance based on respect for the individuality of humans, no matter how small; knowledge of developmental norms and age-appropriate expectations; acceptance of the imperfections of all humans, parent and child alike, and of life itself; and understanding of the unique personality and needs of each individual child. Peaceful parenting takes intention, creativity, self-control, self-awareness, connection, communication, cooperation, and sacrifice. Peaceful parenting is an investment in a peaceful future.”
L.R. Knost

Anne Morrow Lindbergh
“Growth in awareness has always been painful [...] But it does lead to greater independence and, eventually, cooperation in action. For the enormous problems that face the world today, in both the private and public sphere, cannot be solved by women - and men - alone. They can only be surmounted by men and women side by side.”
Anne Morrow Lindbergh, Gift from the Sea

“Our surest protection against assault from abroad has been not all our guards, gates and guns, or even our two oceans, but our essential goodness as a people. Our richest asset has been not our material wealth but our values.”
Ted Sorensen

Yuval Noah Harari
“In order to mount a revolution, numbers are never enough. Revolutions are usually made by small
networks of agitators rather than by the masses. If you want to launch a revolution, don’t ask yourself,
‘How many people support my ideas?’ Instead, ask yourself, ‘How many of my supporters are
capable of effective collaboration?”
Yuval Noah Harari, Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow

Amit Kalantri
“Not every one of us can be great, but every one of us can get associate with something that is great.”
Amit Kalantri, Wealth of Words

“As Pacific Ocean nations, competition and cooperation between the two nations will create a new atmosphere—leading to the Birth of a ‘Pacific’ New World Order—that is more engaging and less confrontational; this can be characterized by the presence of force without war.”
Patrick Mendis, Peaceful War: How the Chinese Dream and the American Destiny Create a New Pacific World Order

Francisco J. Varela
“L'intelligence ne se définit plus comme une faculté de résoudre un problème, mais comme celle de pénétrer un monde partagé.”
Francisco J. Varela

“Great People do not need appreciation for good deeds but all they need is participation in good deeds”
Mohsen Ali

“The greatest ability which differentiate a human being from an animal is the ability to cooperate”
Mohsen Ali

Naomi Klein
“Fundamentally, the task is to articulate not just an alternative set of policy proposals but an alternative worldview to rival the one at the heart of the ecological crisis - embedded in interdependence rather than hyper-individualism, reciprocity rather than dominance, and cooperation rather than hierarchy. This is required not only to create a political context to dramatically lower emissions, but also to help us cope with the disasters we can no longer avoid. Because in the hot and stormy future we have already made inevitable through our past emissions, an unshakable belief in the equal rights of all people and a capacity for deep compassion will be the only things standing between civilization and barbarism.”
Naomi Klein, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate

Yuval Noah Harari
“Prior to the invention of writing, stories were confined by the limited capacity of human brains. You couldn’t invent overly complex stories which people couldn’t remember. With writing you could suddenly create extremely long and intricate stories, which were stored on tablets and papyri rather than in human heads. No ancient Egyptian remembered all of pharaoh’s lands, taxes and tithes; Elvis Presley never even read all the contracts signed in his name; no living soul is familiar with all the laws and regulations of the European Union; and no banker or CIA agent tracks down every dollar in the world. Yet all of these minutiae are written somewhere, and the assemblage of relevant documents defines the identity and power of pharaoh, Elvis, the EU and the dollar.
Writing has thus enabled humans to organise entire societies in an algorithmic fashion. We encountered the term ‘algorithm’ when we tried to understand what emotions are and how brains function, and defined it as a methodical set of steps that can be used to make calculations, resolve problems and reach decisions. In illiterate societies people make all calculations and decisions in their heads. In literate societies people are organised into networks, so that each person is only a small step in a huge algorithm, and it is the algorithm as a whole that makes the important decisions. This is the essence of bureaucracy.”
Yuval Noah Harari, Homo Deus: A History of Tomorrow

Steven Magee
“The police seem to be learning the hard way that the more abusive they are to people, the less people will cooperate with them.”
Steven Magee

“[That] the driving force of the evolution of human intelligence was the coordination of multiple cognitive systems to pursue complex, shared goal [is called] the social brain hypothesis. It attributes the increase in intelligence to the increasing size and complexity of hominid social groups. Living in a group confers advantages, as we have seen with hunting, but it also demands certain cognitive abilities. It requires the ability to communicate in sophisticated ways, to understand and incorporate the perspectives of others, and to share common goals. The social brain hypothesis posits that the cognitive demands and adaptive advantages associated with living in a group created a snowball effect: As groups got larger and developed more complex joint behaviors, individuals developed new capabilities to support those behaviors. These new capabilities in turn allowed groups to get even larger and allowed group behavior to become even more complex.”
Steven Sloman, The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone

“[That] the driving force of the evolution of human intelligence was the coordination of multiple cognitive systems to pursue complex, shared goals [is called] the social brain hypothesis. It attributes the increase in intelligence to the increasing size and complexity of hominid social groups. Living in a group confers advantages, as we have seen with hunting, but it also demands certain cognitive abilities. It requires the ability to communicate in sophisticated ways, to understand and incorporate the perspectives of others, and to share common goals. The social brain hypothesis posits that the cognitive demands and adaptive advantages associated with living in a group created a snowball effect: As groups got larger and developed more complex joint behaviors, individuals developed new capabilities to support those behaviors. These new capabilities in turn allowed groups to get even larger and allowed group behavior to become even more complex.”
Steven Sloman, The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone

Frederick Winslow Taylor
“The search for better, for more competent men, from the presidents of our great companies down to our household servants, was never more vigorous than it is now. And more than ever before is the demand for competent men in excess of the supply.

What we are all looking for, however, is the readymade, competent man; the man whom some one else has trained. It is only when we fully realize that our duty, as well as our opportunity, lies in systematically cooperating to train and to make this competent man, instead of in hunting for a man whom some one else has trained, that we shall be on the road to national efficiency.

In the past the prevailing idea has been well expressed in the saying that “Captains of industry are born, not made”; and the theory has been that if one could get the right man, methods could be safely left to him. In the future it will be appreciated that our leaders must be trained right as well as born right, and that no great man can (with the old system of personal management) hope to compete with a number of ordinary men who have been properly organized so as efficiently to cooperate.

In the past the man has been first; in the future the system must be first. This in no sense, however, implies that great men are not needed. On the contrary, the first object of any good system must be that of developing first-class men; and under systematic management the best man rises to the top more certainly and more rapidly than ever before.”
Frederick Winslow Taylor, The Principles of Scientific Management

Craig D. Lounsbrough
“It is less that you are an adversary and more that you are someone with an opinion that (although frightening to me) might in some way enrich my own. And if I raise myself to being a partner with you on this mutual journey of ours, and if I refuse to bow to the posture of being a frightened adversary as you intersect my journey with a journey different than my own, we can profoundly change what we would have otherwise both died wrestling over.”
Craig D. Lounsbrough