Christian Writers Quotes

Quotes tagged as "christian-writers" (showing 1-12 of 12)
Maquita Donyel Irvin
“she was completely whole
and yet never fully complete”
Maquita Donyel Irvin, Stories of a Polished Pistil: Lace and Ruffles

Maquita Donyel Irvin
“The depths of her thoughts will have you never wanting to surface for air...”
Maquita Donyel Irvin, Stories of a Polished Pistil: Lace and Ruffles

Maquita Donyel Irvin
“I didn't come looking for you the day you uninvitedly appeared on my doorstep

How did we go from nonchalant conversation
me waiting for you to turn me off
with corny jokes and mind dumbing conversation
to
love

To love and mind blowing chemistry that I've yet to make sense of
What are you here to teach me?”
Maquita Donyel Irvin, Stories of a Polished Pistil: Lace and Ruffles

Maquita Donyel Irvin
“Fantasy like thought that no man could rain
Just let her reign
Run wild with her unafraid
Of any rain storms
They only wash the mud away and make way
For double rainbows and sunny days”
Maquita Donyel Irvin, Stories of a Polished Pistil: Lace and Ruffles

Flannery O'Connor
“The novelist is required to create the illusion of a whole world with believable people in it, and the chief difference between the novelist who is an orthodox Christian and the novelist who is merely a naturalist is that the Christian novelist lives in a larger universe. He believes that the natural world contains the supernatural. And this doesn't mean that his obligation to portray the natural is less; it means it is greater.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Maquita Donyel Irvin
“...I fell asleep and had a dream that a king was liquidated by a group of kind faces....”
Maquita Donyel Irvin, Stories of a Polished Pistil: Lace and Ruffles

Maquita Donyel Irvin
“She was rare, few and far between
She suspected he would be as well
And the thought of two rare, few and far between individuals
Doing all that was necessary for that rare, few and far between
Meeting to occur
Drove her to write”
Maquita Donyel Irvin, Stories of a Polished Pistil: Lace and Ruffles

Flannery O'Connor
“The Christian writer will feel that in the greatest depth of vision, moral judgment will be implicit, and that when we are invited to represent the country according to survey, what we are asked to do is to separate mystery from manners and judgment from vision, in order to produce something a little more palatable to the modern temper. We are asked to form our consciences in the light of statistics, which is to establish the relative as absolute. For many this may be a convenience, since we don't live in an age of settled belief; but it cannot be a convenience, it cannot even be possible, for the writer who is a Catholic. He will feel that any long-continued service to it will produce a soggy, formless, and sentimental literature, one that will provide a sense of spiritual purpose for those who connect the spirit with romanticism and a sense of joy for those who confuse that virtue with satisfaction. The storyteller is concerned with what is; but if what is is what can be determined by survey, then the disciples of Dr. Kinsey and Dr. Gallup are sufficient for the day thereof.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Flannery O'Connor
“Unfortunately, to try to disconnect faith from vision is to do violence to the whole personality, and the whole personality participates in the act of writing. The tensions of being a Catholic novelist are probably never balanced for the writer until the Church becomes so much a part of his personality that he can forget about her—in the same sense that when he writes, he forgets about himself.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose

Flannery O'Connor
“The writer who position is Christian, and probably also the writer whose position is not, will begin to wonder at this point if there could not be some ugly correlation between our unparalleled prosperity and the stridency of these demands for a literature that shows us the joy of life. He may at least be permitted to ask if these screams for joy would be quite so piercing if joy were really more abundant in our prosperous society.”
Flannery O'Connor, Mystery and Manners: Occasional Prose