Charles Baudelaire Quotes

Quotes tagged as "charles-baudelaire" Showing 1-13 of 13
Charles Baudelaire
“My heart is lost; the beasts have eaten it.”
Charles Baudelaire, Les Fleurs du Mal

Charles Baudelaire
“I sit in the sky like a sphinx misunderstood; My heart of snow is wed to the whiteness of swans; I hate the movement that displaces the rigid lines, With lips untaught neither tears nor laughter do I know.”
Charles Baudelaire, Selected Poems from Les Fleurs du mal: A Bilingual Edition

Charles Baudelaire
“If rape or arson, poison or the knife
Has wove no pleasing patterns in the stuff
Of this drab canvas we accept as life -
It is because we are not bold enough!”
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
“To be away from home and yet find oneself everywhere at home; to see the world, to be at the centre of the world, and yet remain hidden from the world.”
Charles Baudelaire

Henry James
“An enthusiasm for Poe is the mark of a decidedly primitive stage of reflection. Baudelaire thought him a profound philosopher... Poe was much the greater charlatan of the two, as well as the greater genius.”
Henry James, French Poets and Novelists

Charles Baudelaire
“Dreams, always dreams! and the more ambitious and delicate is the soul, the more its dreams bear it away from possibility. Each man carries in himself his dose of natural opium, incessantly secreted and renewed. From birth to death, how many hours can we count that are filled by positive enjoyment, by successful and decisive action? Shall we ever live, shall we ever pass into this picture which my soul has painted, this picture which resembles you?

These treasures, this furniture, this luxury, this order, these perfumes, these miraculous flowers, they are you. Still you, these mighty rivers and these calm canals! These enormous ships that ride upon them, freighted with wealth, whence rise the monotonous songs of their handling: these are my thoughts that sleep or that roll upon your breast. You lead them softly towards that sea which is the Infinite; ever reflecting the depths of heaven in the limpidity of your fair soul; and when, tired by the ocean's swell and gorged with the treasures of the East, they return to their port of departure, these are still my thoughts enriched which return from the Infinite - towards you.”
Charles Baudelaire, Aleister Crowley

Charles Baudelaire
“—Hypocrite lecteur,—mon semblable,—mon frère!”
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
“By a fatal law, a genius is always an idiot.”
Charles Baudelaire, Correspondance, tome 2 1860-1866

Charles Baudelaire
“Bella soy, ¡oh, mortales!, como un sueño de piedra, y mi seno, que a todos por turno a torturado, fue hecho para inspirar al poeta un amor tal como mi materia, inmortal y callado”
Charles Baudelaire, Flowers of Evil and Other Works/Les Fleurs du Mal et Oeuvres Choisies : A Dual-Language Book (Dover Foreign Language Study Guides)

Charles Baudelaire
“Ey çığ, düşerken alıp götürür müsün beni?”
Charles Baudelaire

Charles Baudelaire
“Es ist etwas Berauschendes am schlechten Geschmack, nämlich das aristokratische Vergnügen, zu mißfallen.”
Charles Baudelaire

Gilles Néret
“A dandy," wrote Charles Baudelaire, "must be looking in his mirror at all times, waking and sleeping." Dali could easily have become the living proof of Baudelaire's dictum. But the literal mirror was not enough for him. Dali needed mirrors of many kinds: his pictures, his admirers, newspapers and magazines and television. And even that still left him unsatisfied.

So one Christmas he took a walk in the streets of New York carrying a bell. He would ring it whenever he felt people were not paying enough attention to him. "The thought of not being recognised was unbearable." True to himself to the bitter end, he delighted in following Catalonian television's bulletins on his state of health during his last days alive (in Quiron hospital in Barcelona); he wanted to hear people talking about him, and he also wanted to know whether his health would revive or whether he would be dying soon. At the age of six he wanted to be a female cook - he specified the gender. At seven he wanted to be Napoleon. "Ever since, my ambition has been continually on the increase, as has my megalomania: now all I want to be is Salvador Dali. But the closer I get to my goal, the further Salvador Dali drifts away from me."

He painted his first picture in 1910 at the age of six. At ten he discovered Impressionist art, and at fourteen the Pompiers (a 19th century group of academic genre painters, among them Meissonier, Detaille and Moreau). By 1927 he was Dali, and the poet and playwright Federico Garcia Lorca, a friend of his youth, wrote an 'Ode to Salvador Dali.' Years later Dali claimed that Lorca had been very attracted to him and had tride to sodomize him, but had not quite managed it. Dali's thirst for scandal was unquenchable. His parents had named him Salvador "because he was the chosen one who was come to save painting from the" deadly menace of abstract art, academic Surrealism, Dadaism, and any kind of anarchic "ism" whatsoever."

If he had lived during the Renaissance, his genius would have been recognized at an earlier stage and indeed considered normal. But in the twentieth century, which Dali damned as stupid, he was thought provocative, a thorn in the flesh. To this day there are many who misunderstand the provocativeness and label him insane. But Dali repeatedly declared: "... the sole difference between me and a madman is the fact that I am not mad!" Dali also said: "The difference between the Surrealists and me is that I am a Surrealist" - which is perfectly true. And he also claimed: "I have the universal curiosity of Renaissance men, and my mental jaws are constantly at work.”
Gilles Néret, Salvador Dalí: 1904-1989

“Kahn krijgt kleur op de wangen bij de herinnering. 'Rodin was een heuse Mozartman,' zegt hij. 'Un homme de Mozart,' herhaal ik en we lachen besmuikt. (De bundel van Baudelaire die Kahn me lang geleden heeft geschonken, de verzen heb ik nooit mooi gevonden, wel staan er prachtige tekeningen van Rodin in het boekje. In de dikke knuisten van de Mozartman, gewend aan hamer en beitel, school een fijne tekenhand.)
De muziek is afgelopen, in de verte kraait een haan. Ik zeg: 'We hebben wat te eten nodig.”
Lia Tilon, Archivaris van de wereld