Black Women Quotes

Quotes tagged as "black-women" Showing 1-30 of 138
Idowu Koyenikan
“Most people write me off when they see me.
They do not know my story.
They say I am just an African.
They judge me before they get to know me.
What they do not know is
The pride I have in the blood that runs through my veins;
The pride I have in my rich culture and the history of my people;
The pride I have in my strong family ties and the deep connection to my community;
The pride I have in the African music, African art, and African dance;
The pride I have in my name and the meaning behind it.
Just as my name has meaning, I too will live my life with meaning.
So you think I am nothing?
Don’t worry about what I am now,
For what I will be, I am gradually becoming.
I will raise my head high wherever I go
Because of my African pride,
And nobody will take that away from me.”
idowu koyenikan, Wealth for all Africans: How Every African Can Live the Life of Their Dreams

Abigail Padgett
“The way black women say "girl" can be magical. Frankly, I have no solid beliefs about the survival of consciousness after physical death. But if it's going to happen I know what I want to see after my trek toward the light. I want to see a black woman who will smile and say, "Girl....”
Abigail Padgett, Blue

Stephanie Lahart
“Black Girls… Stop settling for less than what you deserve. That’s why I stress self-love! There comes a time when you can no longer blame a man. You’ve got to hold yourself accountable for the choices that you make. Choose wisely! Slow down. Pay attention. Don’t allow his good looks and swag to blind you from the truth. Don’t be so easily flattered by money, cars, jewelry, and all of that other stuff. Your heart and well-being is worth much more than that. Choose someone who respects, loves, and adores you. Somebody who has your best interest at heart. Nothing less! Allow yourself to experience REAL love. Stop giving your love, time, and attention to men who clearly don’t deserve it. #ItsAllUpToYou”
Stephanie Lahart

Janet Mock
“My grandmother and my two aunts were an exhibition in resilience and resourcefulness and black womanhood. They rarely talked about the unfairness of the world with the words that I use now with my social justice friends, words like "intersectionality" and "equality", "oppression", and "discrimination". They didn't discuss those things because they were too busy living it, navigating it, surviving it.”
Janet Mock, Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love So Much More

Malebo Sephodi
“The voice of a Black woman should always be HERSELF ...

No edits - no erasure - no pressure - no expectations - no additions - no intruders”
Malebo Sephodi

Toni Morrison
“Then they had grown. Edging into life from the back door. Becoming. Everybody in the world was in a position to give them orders. White women said, "Do this." White children said, "Give me that." White men said. "Come here." Black men said, "Lay down." The only people they need not take orders from were black children and each other. But they took all of that and re-created it in their own image. They ran the houses of white people, and knew it. When white men beat their men, they cleaned up the book and went home to receive abuse from the victim. They beat their children with one hand and stole for them with the other. The hangs that felled trees also cut umbilical cords; the hands that wrung the necks of chickens and butchered hogs also nudged African violets into bloom; the arms that loaded sheaves, bales, and sacks rocked babies into sleep. They patted biscuits into flaky ovals of innocence--and shrouded the dead. They plowed all day and came home to nestle like plums under the limbs of their men, The legs that straddled a mule's back were the same ones that straddled their men's hips. And the difference was all the difference there was.”
Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye

Maya Angelou
“I thought about black women and wondered how we got to be the way we were. In our country, white men were always in superior positions; after them came white women, then black men, then black women, who were historically on the bottom stratum.

How did it happen that we could nurse a nation of strangers, be maids to multitudes of people who scorned us, and still walk with some majesty and stand with a degree of pride?”
Maya Angelou, A Song Flung Up To Heaven

Brittney Cooper
“The collective, orchestrated fury of Black women can move the whole world.”
Brittney Cooper, Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower

Toni Morrison
“They were, in fact and at last, free. And the lives of these old black women were synthesized in their eyes -- a puree of tragedy and humor, wickedness and serenity, truth and fantasy.”
Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye

Alexis Pauline Gumbs
“I respect you as so much bigger than my own understanding. And me too. I don't have to be available to be eligible for breath. I don't have to be measurable in a market of memes. I don't have to be visible to be viable on my path. I don't have to be shy to be sacred about my time. There are only two things I have to do, my mom taught me, and I can do them in the company of my choosing. The company of myself, my living, my dead, my folks, my dreams. 1. Stay Black. 2. Breathe.”
Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Undrowned: Black Feminist Lessons from Marine Mammals

D.B. Mays
“Stunning"

Melanin rich and honeyed, butter brown syrupy
‘Da blacker the berry, the sweeter the sweet
Girl, all hues of the ebony rainbow shine
Our rind so rare, age like fine wine
Lips plump like cherries ready to be picked.
Dey spend all kind of money tryin’ to look like ‘dis”
D.B. Mays, Black Lives, Lines, and Lyrics

D.B. Mays
“We have to teach, tell, and show Black girls that they are beautiful ... that there is no standard of beauty, only defining it. And we, Black girls, define beauty, too. Our hair, shade, shape, and features are beautiful. We set trends, and the world follows.”
D.B. Mays, Black Lives, Lines, and Lyrics

Nadia Owusu
“Black women," Toya said as I walked her to the subway, "are the meatloaf at a Greek diner. People sometimes talk about ordering it, but everyone's surprised when someone does, even black men.”
Nadia Owusu, Aftershocks

Brittany K. Barnett
“No matter how many times my dad urged me to reach for the stars, my understanding of the universe was still confined by the world' limited notion of what a Black country girl from the South could do or who she could become.”
Brittany K. Barnett, A Knock at Midnight: A Story of Hope, Justice, and Freedom

Brittany K. Barnett
“My experience with Red taught me how easy it can be for young women to fall into cycles of abuse-even confident, successful, strong young women. My abusive relationship became my own addiction. I was addicted to the intense highs and lows to the intimacy you share with the one other person who knows just how bad things have gotten. And when you love the person abusing you, you have in-depth knowledge of the pain and brokenness that leads them to treat you in a damaging way. How will they ever heal, you think, if I leave?”
Brittany K. Barnett, A Knock at Midnight: A Story of Hope, Justice, and Freedom

bell hooks
“Certainly, for black women, our struggle has not been to emerge from silence into speech but to change the nature and direction of our speech, to make a speech that compels listeners, one that is heard.”
Bell Hooks, Talking Back: Thinking Feminist, Thinking Black

Malebo Sephodi
“science is knowledge, but who defines what that knowledge is?”
Malebo Sephodi

“I’m starting to truly understand why a lot of women stay single or decide to date other women because we are the true MVP’s. The real providers, the nurturers, the fighters, the backbones, the real supporters, the lovers...Life itself. Now a days men don’t offer much except what’s in their wallets and what’s in their draws, and honestly it still ain’t worth the headache in the long wrong run. Just ask Melania Trump. I can buy a good dick at the toy store.

I used to be the type that was modest and shy to accept money from men, but now I feel like the bastards owe me for everything. My time, my wardrobe because of the pressure society put on me to live up to unrealistic beauty standards, especially being a black woman, my precious energy, for situationships, for the gender pay gap, for his ego, for his intentions, for violating me in his thoughts, for his very life... I mean the list goes on...”
Scarlet Jei Saoirse

D.B. Mays
“Blood-Stained"

Six minutes, no medics, I gasped as ragged breaths escaped my lungs.

“Hold on, Bre, hold on,” my love pleaded, but I was already gone.

I drowned in my own life’s blood as I heard my love weep for me.

Lord, wake us from this nightmare – we want to go back to sleep.”
D.B. Mays, Black Lives, Lines, and Lyrics

Brittney Cooper
“Empowerment looks like cultivating the wisdom to make the best choices we can out of what are customarily a piss-poor set of options. Power looks like the ability to create better options. The powerlessness and capriciousness of being repeatedly jammed up at the personal and political crossroads of one's intersection while a watching world pretends not to see there, needing help, is how it feels to be a Black woman on an ordinary day.”
Brittney Cooper, Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower

Brittney Cooper
“Empowerment looks like cultivating the wisdom to make the best choices we can out of what are customarily a piss-poor set of options. Power looks like the ability to create better options. The powerlessness and capriciousness of being repeatedly jammed up at the personal and political crossroads of one's intersection while a watching world pretends not to see you there, needing help, is how it feels to be a Black woman on an ordinary day.”
Brittney Cooper, Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower

“THE TALENT IS A GIFT
BUT THE
VIBE IS SOLD SEPARATELY!”
Qwana M. "BabyGirl" Reynolds-Frasier

“I’m starting to truly understand why a lot of women stay single or decide to date other women because we are the true MVP’s. The real providers, the nurturers, the fighters, the backbones, the real supporters, the lovers...Life itself. Now a days men don’t offer much except what’s in their wallets and what’s in their draws, and honestly it still ain’t worth the headache in the long run. Just ask Melania Trump.
I can buy a good dick at the toy store.

I used to be the type that was modest and shy to accept money from men, but now I feel like the bastards owe me for everything. My time, my wardrobe-because of the pressure society put on me to live up to unrealistic beauty standards, especially being a black woman-my precious energy, for situationships, for the gender pay gap, for his ego, for his intentions, for violating me in his thoughts, for his very life... I mean the list goes on...”
Scarlet Jei Saoirse

“The good Lorde told us
we weren't meant to survive,

but we've always been good
at going about our lives
in factories and on our knees”
Chet'la Sebree, Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019

“Hurricane Katrina is easily a metaphor for America's attitude toward Black women: rejected, neglected, and never protected. But Black women's persistence and their insistence on survival and restoration are a metaphor for their attitude toward America.”
Deborah Douglas, Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019

“The lexicon must make room for white patriarchy's specific way of disregarding the humanity of Black women in literal physical spaces like New Orleans during and after Katrina, and in the narratives and policy making that either created a pathway home or left them stranded. Every step of the Katrina response "depresenced" Black women, forced them to bear the weight of natural disaster while carrying the cellular memory of trauma one can imagine will pass through bloodlines like so many others.

Unlike erasure, which requires one's presence to be recognized so it can be obliterated, depresencing never acknowledges presence at all. When deployed, people just look right through Black women as if they weren't there.

As violent and silent as depresencing is, there's an antidote. The response to Hurricane Katrina was not the first time the U.S. government abandoned Black women, and it would not be the last. Black women resisted by showing up in the story of their lives, by loving, learning, and leading--despite the systemic barriers and humiliations designed to make them small enough to practically disappear. But Black women did not disappear, and they will not disappear because we know something established power does not: we are something.”
Deborah Douglas, Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019

Malebo Sephodi
“Sometimes, survival is about navigating the thin line between rage and joy”
malebo sephodi

“black women breathe flowers, too.
just because
we are taught to grow them in the lining of our quiet (our grandmothers secret)
does nor mean
we do not swelter with wild tenderness.
we soft swim.
we petal.
we scent limbs.
love.
we just have been too long a garden for sharp and deadly teeth.
so we
have
grown
ourselfves
into
greenhouses.”
Nayyirah Waheed, Salt

“african american women are easy. inferior.
africans are dirty. jungle people.
african americans are lazy. indolent.
african people are too black. ugly.
african americans think they are better than us.
africans think they are better us.


–– listen to the sound of us | we are breaking our mothers heart | the ancestors
weep at how much we look like the hate that came to eat us”
Nayyirah Waheed, Salt

Audre Lorde
“It is not that Black women shed each other's psychic blood so easily, but that we have ourselves bled so often, the pain of bloodshed becomes almost commonplace. If I have learned to eat my own flesh in the forest - starving, keening, learning the lesson of the she-wolf who chews off her own paw to leave the trap behind - if I must drink my own blood, thirsting, why should I stop at yours until your dear dead arms hang like withered garlands upon my breast and I weep for your going, oh my sister, I grieve for our gone.”
Audre Lorde, Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches

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