As You Like It Quotes

Quotes tagged as "as-you-like-it" Showing 1-15 of 15
William Shakespeare
“I like this place and could willingly waste my time in it.”
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
“JAQUES: Rosalind is your love's name?

ORLANDO: Yes, just.

JAQUES: I do not like her name.

ORLANDO: There was no thought of pleasing you when she was christened.”
William Shakespeare, As You Like It

William Shakespeare
“I was too young that time to value her,
But now I know her. If she be a traitor,
Why, so am I. We still have slept together,
Rose at an instant, learned, played, eat together,
And wheresoe'er we went, like Juno's swans,
Still we went coupled and inseparable.”
William Shakespeare, As You Like It

William Shakespeare
“O wonderful, wonderful, and most wonderful wonderful! And yet again wonderful, and after that, out of all hooping.”
William Shakespeare, As You Like It

William Shakespeare
“Under the greenwood tree,
Who loves to lie with me
And tune his merry note,
Unto the sweet bird's throat;
Come hither, come hither, come hither.
Here shall he see
No enemy
But winter and rough weather.”
William Shakespeare, As You Like It

William Shakespeare
“ROSALIND
Now tell me how long you would have her after you have possessed her.

ORLANDO
Forever and a day.

ROSALIND
Say “a day” without the “ever.” No, no, Orlando, men are April when they woo, December when they wed. Maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives. I will be more jealous of thee than a Barbary cock- pigeon over his hen, more clamorous than a parrot against rain, more newfangled than an ape, more giddy in my desires than a monkey. I will weep for nothing, like Diana in the fountain, and I will do that when you are disposed to be merry. I will laugh like a hyena, and that when thou art inclined to sleep.”
William Shakespeare, As You Like It

William Shakespeare
“I have neither the scholar's melancholy, which is emulation; nor the musician's, which is fantastical; nor the courtier's, which is proud; not the soldier's which is ambitious; nor the lawyer's, which is politic; nor the lady's, which is nice; nor the lover's, which is all these: but it is a melancholy of mine own, compounded of many simples, extracted from many objects, and indeed the sundry contemplation of my travels, which, by often rumination, wraps me in a most humorous sadness.”
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
“Here comes a pair of very strange beasts, which in all tongues are called 'fools'.”
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
“Here comes Monseiur Le Beau.
Rosalind: With his mouth full of news.
Celia: Which he will put on us, as pigeons feed their young.
Rosalind: Then shall we be news-crammed.
Celia: All the better; we shall be the more marketable.”
William Shakespeare, As You Like It

William Shakespeare
“You are full of pretty answers. Have you not been acquainted with goldsmiths' wives and conned them out of rings?”
William Shakespeare, As You Like It

William Shakespeare
“Sell when you can: you are not for all markets”
Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616.

William Shakespeare
“Motley's the only wear.”
William Shakespeare, As You Like It

“Here comes a pair of very strange beast, which in all tongues are called "fools".”
Bill Shakespeare

William Shakespeare
“A fool, a fool! I met a fool i' the forest,
A motley fool; a miserable world!
As I do live by food, I met a fool
Who laid him down and bask'd him in the sun,
Andrail'd on Lady Fortune in good terms,
In good set terms and yet a motley fool.
'Good morrow, fool,' quoth I. 'No, sir,' quoth he,
'Call me not fool till heaven hath sent me fortune:'
And then he drew a dial from his poke,
And, looking on it with lack-lustre eye,
Says very wisely, 'It is ten o'clock:
Thus we may see,' quoth he, 'how the world wags:
'Tis but an hour ago since it was nine,
And after one hour more 'twill be eleven;
And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe,
And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot;
And thereby hangs a tale.' When I did hear
The motley fool thus moral on the time,
My lungs began to crow like chanticleer,
That fools should be so deep-contemplative,
And I did laugh sans intermission
An hour by his dial. O noble fool!
A worthy fool! Motley's the only wear.”
William Shakespeare, As You Like It

William Shakespeare
“And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe,
And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot;
And thereby hangs a tale.”
William Shakespeare, Four Comedies: The Taming of the Shrew, A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, Twelfth Night