Art Appreciation Quotes

Quotes tagged as "art-appreciation" Showing 1-12 of 12
Arthur Schopenhauer
“Treat a work of art like a prince: let it speak to you first.”
Arthur Schopenhauer

Ansel Adams
“A photograph is usually looked at- seldom looked into.”
Ansel Adams

T.S. Eliot
“No poet, no artist of any art, has his complete meaning alone. His significance, his appreciation is the appreciation of his relation to the dead poets and artists. You cannot value him alone; you must set him, for contrast and comparison, among the dead. I mean this as a principle of aesthetic, not merely historical, criticism.”
T.S. Eliot, The Sacred Wood

Wayne Gerard Trotman
“For most people, art is only valuable if other people say it is; and artists are only worthwhile if they are either rich and famous, or dead.”
Wayne Gerard Trotman

Kakuzō Okakura
“In my young days I praised the master whose pictures I liked, but as my judgment matured I praised myself for liking what the masters had chosen to have me like.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea

“It has been said that art is a tryst; for in the joy of it, maker and beholder meet.”
Kojiro Tomita

J. Paul Getty
“In my own opinion, the average American's cultural shortcomings can be likened to those of the educated barbarians of ancient Rome. These were barbarians who learned to speak--and often to read and write--Latin. They acquired Roman habits of dress and deportment. Many of them handily mastered Roman commercial, engineering and military techniques--but they remained barbarians nonetheless. They failed to develop any understanding, appreciation or love for the art and culture of the great civilization around them.”
J. Paul Getty, How to Be Rich

Lauren Dane
“Reading, like other types of art appreciation, is intensely personal. So what appeals to people is going to depend on who they are. It depends on what is happening in their life at any given moment. On what has happened to them over the course of their personal history and what makes them feel any number of things. The value of art, when it comes to being appreciated by the beholder makes the person consuming it part of that process. Failing to appreciate that integral part of the process is done at your own peril.

[*Pulls Ranty Pants Up* In Which Lauren Dane Discusses Art, Publishing, Trash and Writing What you Want, Blog Post, May 16, 2013]”
Lauren Dane

Laura Amy Schlitz
“I quite lost myself, gazing at this work of art. . . It thrilled me, that sculpture. For one thing, it reminded me that in my new life, I may have other such experiences. I needn't always be an ignorant girl. The world will offer itself to me like a chalice brimming with immortal wine, and I will quaff from it.”
Laura Amy Schlitz, The Hired Girl

Kakuzō Okakura
“One is reminded in this connection of a story concerning Kobori-Enshiu. Enshiu was complimented by his disciples on the admirable taste he had displayed in the choice of his [art] collection. Said they, "Each piece is such that no one could help admiring. It shows that you had better taste than had Rikiu, for his collection could only be appreciated by one beholder in a thousand." Sorrowfully Enshiu replied: "This only proves how commonplace I am. The great Rikiu dared to love only those objects which personally appealed to him, whereas I unconsciously cater to the taste of the majority. Verily, Rikiu was one in a thousand among tea-masters.”
Kakuzō Okakura, The Book of Tea

Jodi Taylor
“The eyes of the world are fixed on Mars at the moment, sir. Everywhere I look the arts are being shunted aside for technology. It's not necessarily a bad thing but, maybe in some small way, this could redress the balance a little. History--the new sex. Sir.”
Jodi Taylor, Just One Damned Thing After Another

Soetsu Yanagi
“One's assessment of an object must be free and unhampered, with nothing between you and the object. You must look directly at it. To decide that a particular piece must be valuable because it has a particular [artist's signature] seal is weak and demeaning. Your assessment only gains meaning when you look at the object directly, free and unfettered.”
Soetsu Yanagi, The Beauty of Everyday Things