Alzheimers Quotes

Quotes tagged as "alzheimers" (showing 1-30 of 57)
“Affirmations are our mental vitamins, providing the supplementary positive thoughts we need to balance the barrage of negative events and thoughts we experience daily.”
Tia Walker, The Inspired Caregiver: Finding Joy While Caring for Those You Love

Shaun David Hutchinson
“You spend your life hoarding memories against the day you'll lack the energy to go out and make new ones, because that's the comfort of the old age. The ability to look back at your life and know that you left your mark on the world. But I'm losing my memories, it's like someone's broken into my piggy bank and is robbing me one penny at a time. It's happening so slowly, I can hardly tell what's missing.”
Shaun David Hutchinson, We Are the Ants

Sarah Ockler
“But I knew he wouldn't kiss me. Not tonight. Not like this. There was too much between us now, all the words and near misses. All the potential, the alternate futures that would stretch out before us in an unending spiral, all built on what happened in this moment. I held his fiery gaze and remembered the five-oh, the half-and-half, the promises I'd whispered to myself in the dawn light.

I might lose all my memories one day, but that wouldn't keep me from making them.”
Sarah Ockler, The Book of Broken Hearts

“I read of a Buddhist teacher who developed Alzheimer's. He had retired from teaching because his memory was unreliable, but he made one exception for a reunion of his former students. When he walked onto the stage, he forgot everything, even where he was and why. However, he was a skilled Buddhist and he simply began sharing his feelings with the crowd. He said, "I am anxious. I feel stupid. I feel scared and dumb. I am worried that I am wasting everyone's time. I am fearful. I am embarrassing myself." After a few minutes of this, he remembered his talk and proceeded without apology. The students were deeply moved, not only by his wise teachings, but also by how he handled his failings.

There is a Buddhist saying, "No resistance, no demons.”
Mary Pipher, Seeking Peace: Chronicles of the Worst Buddhist in the World

Joyce Rachelle
“Dementia: Is it more painful to forget, or to be forgotten?”
Joyce Rachelle

Viola Shipman
“I've had an amazing life. One filled with blessings I could never have imagined.

Depressed is the last thing I am. Realistic, yes. Sad, never.”
Viola Shipman, The Charm Bracelet

Rebecca Rijsdijk
“And sometimes
when she does remember,
she calls me her little angel
and she knows where she is
and everything is all right
for a second or a minute
and then we cry;
she for the life that she lost
I for the woman I only know about
through the stories of her children.”
Rebecca Rijsdijk, Portraits of Girls I never Met

Daniel G. Amen
“Caffeine dehydrates the brain and body.”
Daniel G. Amen, Preventing Alzheimer's: Ways to Help Prevent, Delay, Detect, and Even Halt Alzheimer's Disease and Other Forms of Memory Loss

Judy Cornish
“Offering care means being a companion, not a superior. It doesn’t matter whether the person we are caring for is experiencing cancer, the flu, dementia, or grief.

If you are a doctor or surgeon, your expertise and knowledge comes from a superior position. But when our role is to be providers of care, we should be there as equals.”
Judy Cornish, The Dementia Handbook: How to Provide Dementia Care at Home

James Hauenstein
“The reason I might forget something is because my mind is like a computer. I have so much useless stuff stored up in there, that when I forget to clean out my Mind's Cache, it has no room for new information. Like wearing pants!”
James Hauenstein

Tara Reed
“While no one can change the outcome of dementia or Alzheimer's, with the right support you can change the journey.”
Tara Reed, What to do Between the Tears... A Practical Guide to Dealing with a Dementia or Alzheimer's Diagnosis in the Family: Feel less overwhelmed and more empowered. You don't have to go through this alone

Shaun David Hutchinson
“I look at people and I don't know them. Yesterday, I spent twenty minutes trying to figure out who the grumpy woman sitting beside me was before I realized it was your mother. [...] I've led a rich life, Henry, but I'm terrified of dying a pauper.”
Shaun David Hutchinson, We Are the Ants

Lisa Genova
“I don’t know how much longer I have to know you.”
Lisa Genova, Still Alice

Lisa Genova
“I can’t stand the thought of looking at you someday, this face I love, and not knowing who you are.”
Lisa Genova, Still Alice

“Overstimulation of IGF-1-signaling pathways in the brain due to milk consumption could thus accelerate the onset of neurodegenerative disease. IGF-1 passes the blood-brain barrier and reaches the neurons in the brain.”
Bodo Melnik

Judy Cornish
“Even though people experiencing dementia become unable to recount what has just happened, they still go through the experience—even without recall.
The psychological present lasts about three seconds. We experience the present even when we have dementia. The emotional pain caused by callous treatment or unkind talk occurs during that period.
The moods and actions of people with dementia are expressions of what they have experienced, whether they can still use language and recall, or not.”
Judy Cornish, The Dementia Handbook: How to Provide Dementia Care at Home

“The association between the post-encephalitic syndrome and demyelination or incomplete myelination of the brain seems quite secure. And the fact that encephalitis -including that caused by vaccination- can cause demyelination has been known since the 1920's!”
Harris Coulter, Vaccination, Social Violence, and Criminality: The Medical Assault on the American Brain

“The day the roles reverse is foreign. It’s a clumsy dance of love and responsibility, not wanting to cross any lines of respect. It’s honoring this person who gave their life to you—not to mention literally gave you life—and taking their fragile body in your hands like a newborn, tending to their every need.”
Lisa Goich

Judy Cornish
“Even though people experiencing dementia become unable to recount what has just happened, they still go through the experience—even without recall.

The psychological present lasts about three seconds. We experience the present even when we have dementia. The emotional pain caused by callous treatment or unkind talk occurs during that period.

The moods and actions of people with dementia are expressions of what they have experienced, whether they can still use language and recall, or not.”
Judy Cornish, The Dementia Handbook: How to Provide Dementia Care at Home

Jenny Downham
“I'd like to go home now,' she said softly. She hoped someone would show her the way.”
Jenny Downham, Unbecoming

Kathryn     Harrison
“Tears water our eyes.

"Remember," mom soothes, "like the beautiful blooms beneath the weeds, Nana is still Nana underneath.”
Kathryn Harrison, Weeds in Nana's Garden: A Heartfelt Story of Love That Helps Explain Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias.

Steven Magee
“Dying from an aggressive fatal brain tumor is like dying from Alzheimer's disease accelerated one hundred times.”
Steven Magee

“A nation discovers its truest dignity when it cherishes the dignity of those from whom it has not heard for a very long time.”
Sally Magnusson, Where Memories Go

Lisa Genova
“She could always walk somewhere without him. Of course this somewhere had to be somewhere "safe." She could walk to her office. But she didn't want to go to her office. She felt bored, ignored, and alienated in her office. She felt ridiculous there. She didn't belong there anymore. In all the expansive grandeur that was Harvard, there wasn't room there for a cognitive psychology professor with a broken cognitive psyche.”
Lisa Genova, Still Alice

Lisa Genova
“It's like you don't get that she's not gone yet, like you think her time left isn't meaningful anymore. You're acting like a selfish child.”
Lisa Genova, Still Alice

Lisa Genova
“I miss myself."
"I miss you too, Ali, so much."
"I never planned to get like this."
"I know.”
Lisa Genova, Still Alice

Steven Magee
“You are not crazy, but you may be losing your mind.”
Steven Magee

Kristen Henderson
“If you knew you were
going to lose your memory
but you could choose five things
you’d never forget, what would they be—
a certain face, a taste, a scent,
a touch; how deep
in this, the middle
of your life?”
Kristen Henderson

“The literature has only these words of comfort for a patient and her family at this stage. Remember, there is still a living spirit inside this diminished person, the spirit of someone you love.”
Dan Gasby, Before I Forget: Love, Hope, Help, and Acceptance in Our Fight Against Alzheimer's

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