Aldous Huxley Quotes

Quotes tagged as "aldous-huxley" (showing 1-30 of 42)
Neil Postman
“We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn't, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.

But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell's dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley's vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.

What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions." In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.

This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.”
Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

Aldous Huxley
“And that," put in the Director sententiously, "that is the secret of happiness and virtue — liking what you've got to do. All conditioning aims at that: making people like their unescapable social destiny.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“Back to culture. Yes, actually to culture. You can’t consume much if you sit still and read books.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Neil Postman
“What Huxley teaches is that in the age of advanced technology, spiritual devastation is more likely to come from an enemy with a smiling face than from one whose countenance exudes suspicion and hate. In the Huxleyan prophecy, Big Brother does not watch us, by his choice. We watch him, by ours. There is no need for wardens or gates or Ministries of Truth. When a population becomes distracted by trivia, when cultural life is redefined as a perpetual round of entertainments, when serious public conversation becomes a form of baby-talk, when, in short, a people become an audience and their public business a vaudeville act, then a nation finds itself at risk; a culture-death is a clear possibility.”
Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

Aldous Huxley
“That we are not much sicker and much madder than we are is due exclusively to that most blessed and blessing of all natural graces, sleep.”
Aldous Huxley

Albert Hofmann
“I know LSD; I don't need to take it anymore. Maybe when I die, like Aldous Huxley.”
Albert Hofmann

Aldous Huxley
“Thought must be divided against itself before it can come to any knowledge of itself.”
Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley
“The quality of moral behaviour varies in inverse ratio to the number of human beings involved.”
Aldous Huxley

Christopher Hitchens
“We can always be sure of one thing—that the messengers of discomfort and sacrifice will be stoned and pelted by those who wish to preserve at all costs their own contentment. This is not a lesson that is confined to the Testaments.”
Christopher Hitchens, Love, Poverty, and War: Journeys and Essays

Aldous Huxley
“Las palabras, como los rayos X, atraviesan cualquier cosa, si uno las emplea bien.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Neil Postman
“What we are confronted with now is the problem posed by the economic and symbolic structure of television. Those who run television do not limit our access to information but in fact widen it. Our Ministry of Culture is Huxleyan, not Orwellian. It does everything possible to encourage us to watch continuously. But what we watch is a medium which presents information in a form that renders it simplistic, nonsubstantive, nonhistorical and noncontextual; that is to say, information packaged as entertainment. In America, we are never denied the opportunity to entertain ourselves.”
Neil Postman

Aldous Huxley
“Specialized meaninglessness has come to be regarded, in certain circles, as a kind of hallmark of true science.”
Aldous Huxley, Complete Essays 4, 1936-38

Aldous Huxley
“What we feel and think and are is to a great extent determined by the state of our ductless glands and viscera.”
Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley
“In the final stage of ego-lessness there is an 'obscure knowledge' that All is In all - that All is actually each. This is as near, I take it, as a finite mind can ever come to 'perceiving everything that is happening everywhere in the universe'.”
Aldous Huxley, The Doors of Perception & Heaven and Hell

Aldous Huxley
“This is how one ought to see," I repeated yet again. And I might have added, "These are the sort of things one ought to look at." Things without pretensions, satisfied to be merely themselves, sufficient in their suchness, not acting a part, not trying, insanely, to go it alone, in isolation from the Dharma-Body, in Luciferian defiance of the grace of God.”
Aldous Huxley, The Doors of Perception & Heaven and Hell

Aldous Huxley
“He had allowed the advertisers to multiply his wants; he had learned to equate happiness with possessions, and prosperity with money to spend in a shop.”
Aldous Huxley

Michael  Sanders
“I feel part of the environment, not separate from it, as though I’m at home rather than visiting—as though I’m tapped into some eternal omnipresence beyond the transient physical forms.”
Michael Sanders, Ayahuasca: An Executive's Enlightenment

Aldous Huxley
“But God doesn’t change.’
'Men do, though.’
'What difference does that make?’
'All the difference in the world.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

“Rand, Huxley, Orwell, and Bradbury foresaw much of today’s dystopian world: its spiritual and moral emptiness, its culture of consumerism, its flat-souled Last Manishness, its debasement of language, its doublethink, its illiteracy, and its bovine tolerance of authoritarian indignities. But they did not foresee the most serious and catastrophic of today’s problems: the eminent destruction of whites, and western culture.

None of them thought to deal with race at all. Why is this? Probably for the simple reason that it never occurred to any of them that whites might take slave morality so far as to actually will their own destruction. As always, the truth is stranger than fiction.”
Jef Costello

Aldous Huxley
“Wer zu lesen versteht, besitzt den Schlüssel zu großen Taten, zu unerträumten Möglichkeiten.”
Aldous Huxley

Joan Fuster
“Si sou capaços de llegir Huxley a dosis massives, acabareu imaginant-vos-el com una temible, incessant, pròdiga, miraculosa, inútil màquina de pensar.”
Joan Fuster, Consells, proverbis i insolències

Elizabeth Bowen
“The stupid person's idea of the clever person. [on Aldous Huxley, in Spectator magazine, 1936]”
Elizabeth Bowen

Aldous Huxley
“Uno cree las cosas porque ha sido acondicionado para creerlas.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“For their sadness was a symptom of their love for one another—”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Donald Jeffries
“Aldous Huxley is known today primarily as the author of the novel
Brave New World. He was one of the first prominent Americans to publicly
endorse the use of psychedelic drugs. Controversial political theorist Lyndon
Larourche called Huxley “the high priest for Britain’s opium war,” and
claimed he played a conspicuous role in laying the groundwork for the
Sixties counterculture. Huxley’s grandfather was Thomas H. Huxley, founder
of the Rhodes Roundtable and a longtime collaborator with establishment
British historian Arnold Toynbee. Toynbee headed the Research Division
of British Intelligence during World War II, and was a briefing officer to
Winston Churchill. Aldous Huxley was tutored at Oxford by novelist H.
G. Wells, a well-known advocate of world government. Expounding in his
“Open Conspiracy: Blue Prints for a World Revolution,” Wells wrote, “The
Open Conspiracy will appear first, I believe, as a conscious organization of
intelligent and quite possibly in some cases, wealthy men, as a movement
having distinct social and political aims. . . . In all sorts of ways they will
be influencing and controlling the apparatus of the ostensible government.”
Wells introduced Huxley to the notorious Satanist, Aleister Crowley.”
Donald Jeffries, Hidden History: An Exposé of Modern Crimes, Conspiracies, and Cover-Ups in American Politics

“You and Aldous Huxley", she said, "both have the same superior hate for the rest of the human race and wouldn't go one inch out of your way to help anyone. Evil has far more reality than good in your minds.”
Kate Hennessy, Dorothy Day; The World Will Be Saved By Beauty: An Intimate Portrait of Dorothy Day

Aldous Huxley
“But wouldn’t you like to be free to be happy in some other way, Lenina? In your own way, for example; not in everybody else’s way.”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“Եվ դա է երջանկության և առաքինության գաղտնիքը՝ սիրել այն, ինչ նախատեսված է քեզ համար... Օլդոս Հաքսլի «Չքնաղ նոր աշխարհ»”
Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

Aldous Huxley
“Bueno, pues yo prefiero ser desdichado a tener esa engañosa felicidad, falsa, que tienen aquí.”
Aldous Huxley, Un mundo feliz

Aldous Huxley
“Los impulsos que están contenidos se derraman, y el derrame es pasión, es sentimiento, incluso es demencia: ello va a depender de la altura y la resistencia con que fue contenida, y de la fuerza de la corriente. La corriente fluye suavemente cuando no es detenida por ningún obstáculo, descendiendo por los canales que le han sido dispuestos hasta producir un tranquilo bienestar (...)”
Aldous Huxley, Un mundo feliz

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