African Literature Quotes

Quotes tagged as "african-literature" (showing 1-30 of 53)
Idowu Koyenikan
“Most people write me off when they see me.
They do not know my story.
They say I am just an African.
They judge me before they get to know me.
What they do not know is
The pride I have in the blood that runs through my veins;
The pride I have in my rich culture and the history of my people;
The pride I have in my strong family ties and the deep connection to my community;
The pride I have in the African music, African art, and African dance;
The pride I have in my name and the meaning behind it.
Just as my name has meaning, I too will live my life with meaning.
So you think I am nothing?
Don’t worry about what I am now,
For what I will be, I am gradually becoming.
I will raise my head high wherever I go
Because of my African pride,
And nobody will take that away from me.”
Idowu Koyenikan, Wealth for All Africans: How Every African Can Live the Life of Their Dreams

Chinua Achebe
“Among the Igbo the art of conversation is regarded very highly, and proverbs are the palm-oil with which words are eaten.”
Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart

Idowu Koyenikan
“You can no longer see or identify yourself solely as a member of a tribe, but as a citizen of a nation of one people working toward a common purpose.”
Idowu Koyenikan, Wealth for All Africans: How Every African Can Live the Life of Their Dreams

Sahndra Fon Dufe
“Whatever you are looking for is also looking for you. You see, don't only look. Be available and ready when it shows up”
Sahndra Fon Dufe

Diriye Osman
“The God of Imagination lived in fairytales. And the best fairytales made you fall in love. It was while flicking through "Sleeping Beauty" that I met my first love, Ivar. He was a six-year-old bello ragazzo with blond hair and eyebrows. He had bomb-blue eyes and his two front teeth were missing.
The road to Happily Ever After, however, was paved with political barbed wire. Three things stood in my way.
1. The object of my affection didn't know he was the object of my affection.
2. The object of my affection preferred Action Man to Princess Aurora.
3. The object of my affection was a boy and I wasn't allowed to love a boy.”
Diriye Osman, Fairytales for Lost Children

Sahndra Fon Dufe
“A PHD is not the end of education. Education exists even among the bees who feed their queen only with the purest”
Sahndra Fon Dufe

NoViolet Bulawayo
“Because we were not in our country, we could not use our own languages, and so when we spoke our voices came out bruised. When we talked, our tongues thrashed madly in our mouths, staggered like drunken men. Because we were not using our languages we said things we did not mean; what we really wanted to say remained folded inside. trapped. In America we did not always have the words. It was only when were were by ourselves that we spoke in our real voices. When we were alone we summoned the horses of our languages and mounted their backs and galloped past skyscrapers. Always, we were reluctant to come back.”
NoViolet Bulawayo, We Need New Names

Mike Ormsby
“I'm not interested in whether I'm better than you; only whether I'm better than yesterday.”
Mike Ormsby, Child Witch Kinshasa

Ali A. Mazrui
“Africa PRODUCES what it does NOT CONSUME and CONSUMES what it does NOT PRODUCE.”
Ali A. Mazrui, Africa, The Next Thirty Years

Ayi Kwei Armah
“She spoke of those needing the white destroyers' shiny things to bring a feeling of worth into their lives, uttered their deep-rooted inferiority of soul, and called them lacking in the essence of humanity: womanhood in women, manhood in men. For which deficiency they must crave things to eke out their beings, things to fill holes in their spirits.”
Ayi Kwei Armah, Two Thousand Seasons

Ayi Kwei Armah
“...there is indeed a great force in the world, a force spiritual and able to shape the physical universe, but that force is not something cut off, not something separate from ourselves. It is the energy in us, the strongest in our working, breathing, thinking together as one people; weakest when we are scattered, confused, broken into individual, unconnected fragments.”
Ayi Kwei Armah

NoViolet Bulawayo
“If these walls could talk, the buildings would stutter, wouldn't remember their names.”
NoViolet Bulawayo, We Need New Names

Lazarus Takawira
“A powerful leader has no problem letting go of power”
Lazarus Takawira, Imagine Africa: Home Hope Harmony

Lazarus Takawira
“Evocative is our history but exciting is our future”
Lazarus Takawira, Imagine Africa: Home Hope Harmony

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o
“The Whiteman told of another country beyond the sea where a powerful woman sat on a throne while men and women danced under the shadow of her authority and benevolence. She was ready to spread the shadow to cover the Agikuyu. They laughed at this eccentric man whose skin had been so scalded that the black outside had peeled off. The hot water must have gone into his head.

Nevertheless, his words about a woman on the throne echoed something in the heart, deep down in their history. It was many, many years ago. Then women ruled the land of the Agikuyu. Men had no property, they were only there to serve the whims and needs of the women. Those were hard years. So they waited for women to go to war, they plotted a revolt, taking an oath of secrecy to keep them bound each to each in the common pursuit of freedom. They would sleep with all the women at once, for didn't they know the heroines would return hungry for love and relaxation? Fate did the rest; women were pregnant; the takeover met with little resistance.”
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o, A Grain of Wheat

Enock Maregesi
“To be able to influence Tanzanian literature and African literature, and sell our books in Tanzania as well as in our continent, we need to be committed to what we do. And what we do is writing. Write as much as you can. Read as much as you can. Use the library and the internet carefully for research and talk to people, about things that matter. To make a living from writing, and make people read again in Tanzania and Africa; we must write very well, very good stories.”
Enock Maregesi

Ama Ata Aidoo
“Clearly, she was enjoying herself to see that woman hurt. It was nothing she had desired. Nor did it seem as if she could control it, this inhuman sweet sensation to see another human being squirming. It hit her like a stone, the knowledge that there is pleasure in hurting. A strong three-dimensional pleasure, an exclusive masculine delight that is exhilarating beyond all measure. And this too is God's gift to man? She wondered.”
Ama Ata Aidoo, Our Sister Killjoy

Chinua Achebe
“In such a regime, I say you died a good death if your life had inspired someone to come forward and shoot your murderer in the chest - without asking to be paid.”
Chinua Achebe, A Man of the People

Ama Ata Aidoo
“From all around the Third World,
You hear the same story;
Rulers
Asleep to all things at
All times -
Conscious only of
Riches, which they gather in a
Coma -
Intravenously

So that
You wouldn't know they were
Feeding if it was not for the
Occasional
Tell-tale trickle somewhere
Around the mouth.
And when they are jolted awake,
They stare about them with
Unseeing eyes, just
Sleepwalkers in a nightmare.”
Ama Ata Aidoo, Our Sister Killjoy

“We may differ in the language we speak, yet we all remain children of the land.”
John Okechukwu Munonye, A Wreath For The Maidens

“We should, I think, proceed to enquire into what we mean by ideals - or rather, to examine, critically, the nature of those acts which to us appear to be outward manifestations of idealisms”
John Okechukwu Munonye, A Wreath For The Maidens

Ama Ata Aidoo
“Sissie could see it all. In her uncertain eyes, on her restless hands and on her lips, which she kept biting all the time.
But oh, her skin. It seemed as if according to the motion of her emotions Marija's skin kept switching on and switching off like a two-colour neon sign. So that watching her against the light of the dying summer sun, Sissie could not help thinking that it must be a pretty dangerous matter, being white. It made you feel awfully exposed, rendered you terribly vulnerable. Like being born without your skin or something. As though the Maker had fashioned the body of a human, stuffed it into a polythene bag instead of the regular protective covering, and turned it loose into the world.

Lord, she wondered, is that why, on the whole, they have had to be extra ferocious? Is it so they could feel safe here on the earth, under the sun, the moon and the stars?”
Ama Ata Aidoo, Our Sister Killjoy

Yvonne Vera
“We walked in wisdom with our shadows, in search of the dead part of ourselves, which would be our shelter.”
Yvonne Vera, Nehanda

Ama Ata Aidoo
“One had said, 'You say you come from Ghaanna? Then we have a lot in common!' Sissie didn't know what to do with the statement, uncertain of whether it was a threat or a promise.

'We had chiefs like you,' the Scot went on, 'who fought one another and all, while the Invader marched in.' Sissie thanked her, but also felt strongly that their kinship had better end right there.”
Ama Ata Aidoo, Our Sister Killjoy

T.M. Aluko
“The sky was overcast with thick, grey clouds drifting in the direction of Idasa. That meant rain. It would come, as long as the clouds drifted in that direction. Lightening flashes momentarily parted the clouds...Shango, the god of lightening and thunder, was registering his anger as this strange talk of a new God is taking hold of simple folk who were once unquestioning votaries of his order. The new malady must be nipped in the bud.”
T.M. Aluko

“The long rays of sun stretched across the street and touched the twisted mabati tin roofs of the shops, creating a soft light that dulled the dust and rust, making them look almost beautiful.”
Stanley Gazemba (Bahati Books)

Flora Nwapa
“When Efuru went home, Ajanupu could not help admiring her character. "She is a woman among women. I like the way she is carrying her burden. She still loves that imbecile husband of hers and she is going in search of him.”
Flora Nwapa, Efuru

Flora Nwapa
“As Adiewere and Efuru were eating, a troop of children with shining tummies in front of them were seen approaching. "These children are just in time. The way they time themselves is admirable.”
Flora Nwapa, Efuru

Jovita Obadolagbonyi
“will the crocodile not feed if there are no fishes in the river? will the hen not peck its chick if its does not heed to her warnings? he stopped at his heels and started singing a very strange song.”
Jovita Obadolagbonyi, Tales of an African Child

Flora Nwapa
“There is no problem in this world that cannot be solved.”
Flora Nwapa, Efuru

« previous 1
All Quotes | My Quotes | Add A Quote