Geraldo Poquette > Geraldo's Quotes

Showing 1-30 of 161
« previous 1 3 4 5 6
sort by

  • #1
    Charles Bukowski
    “I remember awakening one morning and finding everything smeared with the color of forgotten love.”
    Charles Bukowski, What Matters Most is How Well You Walk Through the Fire

  • #2
    Charles Bukowski
    “I loved you like a man loves a woman he never touches, only writes to, keeps little photographs of.”
    Charles Bukowski, Love Is a Dog from Hell

  • #3
    Charles Bukowski
    “We are like roses that have never bothered to bloom when we should have bloomed and it is as if the sun has become disgusted with waiting”
    Charles Bukowski

  • #4
    Charles Bukowski
    “those who escape hell
    however
    never talk about
    it
    and nothing much
    bothers them
    after
    that.”
    Charles Bukowski

  • #5
    Charles Bukowski
    “Of course it's possible to love a human being if you don't know them too well.”
    Charles Bukowski

  • #6
    Donna Tartt
    “Maybe the one had to be lost for the others to be found?”
    Donna Tartt, The Goldfinch

  • #7
    Donna Tartt
    “She was the golden thread running through everything, a lens that magnified beauty so that the whole world stood transfigured in relation to her, and her alone.”
    Donna Tartt, The Goldfinch

  • #8
    Donna Tartt
    “Yet my longing for her was like a bad cold that had hung on for years despite my conviction that I was sure to get over it at any moment.”
    Donna Tartt, The Secret History

  • #9
    Donna Tartt
    “But Robin: their dear little Robs. More than ten years later, his death remained an agony; there was no glossing any detail; its horror was not subject to repair or permutation by any of the narrative devices that the Cleves knew. And—since this willful amnesia had kept Robin's death from being translated into that sweet old family vernacular which smoothed even the bitterest mysteries into comfortable, comprehensible form—the memory of that day's events had a chaotic, fragmented quality, bright mirrorshards of nightmare which flared at the smell of wisteria, the creaking of a clothes-line, a certain stormy cast of spring light.”
    Donna Tartt, The Little Friend
    tags: death

  • #10
    Donna Tartt
    “...it was complicated, she wasn't thinking only of herself but me too, since we'd both been through so many of the same things, she and I, and we were an awful lot alike-too much. And because we'd both been hurt so badly, so early on, in violent and irremediable ways that most people didn't, and couldn't, understand, wasn't it a bit… precarious? A matter of self-preservation? Two rickety and death-driven persons who would need to lean on each other quite so much? not to say she wasn't doing well at the moment, because she was, but all that could change in a flash with either of us, couldn't it? the reversal, the sharp downward slide, and wasn't that the danger? since our flaws and weaknesses were so much the same, and one of us could bring the other down way too quick? and though this was left to float in the air a bit, I realized instantly, and with some considerable astonishment, what she was getting at. (Dumb of me not to have seen it earlier, after all the injuries, the crushed leg, the multiple surgeries; adorable drag in the voice, adorable drag in the step, the arm-hugging and the pallor, the scarves and sweaters and multiple layers of clothes, slow drowsy smile: she herself, the dreamy childhood her, was sublimity and disaster, the morphine lollipop I'd chased for all those years.)”
    Donna Tartt, The Goldfinch

  • #11
    Donna Tartt
    “It's a terrible thing, what we did,” said Francis abruptly. “I mean, this man was not Voltaire we killed. But still. It’s a shame. I feel bad about it.”
    “Well, of course, I do too,” said Henry matter-of-factly. “But not bad enough to want to go to jail for it.”
    Francis snorted and poured himself another shot of whiskey and drank it straight off. “No,” he said. “Not that bad.”
    Donna Tartt, The Secret History

  • #12
    Anthony Burgess
    “Well, everything's a lesson, isn't it? Learning all the time, as you could say.”
    Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

  • #13
    Anthony Burgess
    “Unfortunately there is so much original sin in us all that we find evil rather attractive. To devastate is easier and more spectacular than to create.”
    Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

  • #14
    Anthony Burgess
    “There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie, and Dim, Dim being really dim, and we sat in the Korova Milkbar making up rassoodocks what to do with the evening, a flip dark chill winter bastard though dry. The Korova Milkbar was a milk-plus mesto, and you may, O my brothers, have forgotten what these mestos were like, things changing so skorry these days, and everybody very quick to forget, newspapers not being read much neither.”
    Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

  • #15
    Anthony Burgess
    “And I sort of frowned about that, thinking. 'You felt ill this afternoon,' he said, 'because you're getting better. When we're healthy we respond to the presence of the hateful with fear and nausea. You're becoming healthy, that's all.”
    Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

  • #16
    Anthony Burgess
    “Come and get one in the yarbles, if you have any yarbles, you enuch jelly, thou”
    Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange

  • #17
    Irvine Welsh
    “Ah don’t really know, Tam, ah jist dinnae. It kinday makes things seem mair real tae us. Life’s boring and futile. We start aof wi high hopes, then we bottle it. We realise that we’re aw gaunnae die, withoot really findin oot the big answers. We develop aw they long-winded ideas which just interpret the reality ay oor lives in different weys, withoot really extending oor body ay worthwhile knowledge, about the big things, the real things. Basically, we live a short, disappointing life; and then we die. We fill up oor lives wi shite, things like careers and relationships tae delude oorsels that it isnae totally pointless. Smack’s an honest drug, because it strips away these delusions. Wi smack, whin ye feel good, ye feel immortal. Whin ye feel bad, it intensifies the shite that’s already thair. It’s the only really honest drug. It doesnae alter yer consciousness. It just gies ye a hit and a sense ay well-being. Eftir that, ye see the misery ay the world as it is, and ye cannae anaesthetise yirsel against it.”
    Irvine Welsh, Trainspotting

  • #18
    Irvine Welsh
    “Me abraza con fuerza, pero no hay amor ni ternura. Sólo desesperación. Quizá tenga que ver con la conciencia de que me estoy alejando de él, alejándome de este mundo que él quiere que habite: su mundo, el mundo que no compartimos.”
    Irvine Welsh, Ecstasy

  • #19
    Irvine Welsh
    “He's going on and on, and I can't be bothered. I just can't be fuckin well arsed saying something like: Solaris shites all over 2001, and then listening to him arguing vehemently against it. Or, alternatively, waiting for him to say it, and then being expected to argue engingly, as if to agree, even if we do, is a sign that we're effete proofs. I can't be bothered with it and I can't even be bothered to tell him that I can'be be bothered.”
    Irvine Welsh, Porno

  • #20
    Irvine Welsh
    “- Then whit?
    - Git a job. Or git oan a scheme.
    - No gaunnae stey oan n take Highers?
    - Naw.
    - Ye should. You could go tae University.
    - Whit fir?
    Geoff had to think for a while. He had recently graduated with a degree in English Literature and was on the dole. So were most of his fellow graduates.
    - It's a good social life, he said.”
    Irvine Welsh, Trainspotting

  • #21
    Irvine Welsh
    “Spud has two expressions: totally-scoobied-as-to-what-the-fuck's-going-on and the constantly-on-the-verge-of-tears look he is currently deploying. Assailed with self pity and self loathing, regarding his folly in sitting next to Begbie, he glances around. - Aye... it's bad, like say, he concedes, wondering how he can manoeuvre into another seat.”
    Irvine Welsh

  • #22
    Iain Banks
    “Outright destruction of rebellious ships or habitats - pour encouragez les autres - of course remains an option for the controlling power, but all the usual rules of uprising realpolitik still apply, especially that concerning the peculiar dialectic of dissent which - simply stated - dictates that in all but the most dedicatedly repressive hegemonies, if in a sizable population there are one hundred rebels, all of whom are then rounded up and killed, the number of rebels present at the end of the day is not zero, and not even one hundred, but two hundred or three hundred or more; an equation based on human nature which seems often to baffle the military and political mind.”
    Iain M. Banks

  • #23
    Iain Banks
    “As a writer, you get to play, you get to alter time, you get to come up with the smart lines and the clever comebacks you wish you'd thought of.”
    Iain Banks

  • #24
    Iain Banks
    “Special Circumstances had always been the Contact section’s moral espionage weapon, the very cutting edge of the Culture’s interfering diplomatic policy, the elite of the elite, in a society which abhorred elitism. Even before the war, its standing and its image within the Culture had been ambiguous. It was glamorous but dangerous, possessed of an aura of roguish sexiness - there was no other word for it - which implied predation, seduction and even violation…No other part of the Culture more exactly represented what the society as a whole really stood for, or was more militant in the application of he Culture’s fundamental beliefs. Yet no other part embodied less of the society’s day-to-day character.”
    Iain M. Banks, Consider Phlebas

  • #25
    Iain Banks
    “Everything about us, everything around us, everything we know and can know of is composed ultimately of patterns of nothing; that’s the bottom line, the final truth. So where we find we have any control over those patterns, why not make the most elegant ones, the most enjoyable and good ones, in our own terms? Yes, we’re hedonists, Mr. Bora Horza Gobuchul. We seek pleasure and have fashioned ourselves so that we can take more of it; admitted. We are what we are. But what about you? What does that make you?”
    Iain M. Banks

  • #26
    J.G. Ballard
    “In a sense, these people were the vanguard of a well-to-do and well-educated proletariat of the future, boxed up in these expensive apartments with their elegant furniture and intelligent sensibilities, and no possibility of escape.”
    J.G. Ballard, High-Rise

  • #27
    J.G. Ballard
    “The endless newsreel clips of nuclear explosions that we saw on TV in the 1960s (were) a powerful incitement to the psychotic imagination, sanctioning *everything*.”
    J.G. Ballard, The Atrocity Exhibition

  • #28
    J.G. Ballard
    “No middle class revolution can defend the barricades without a shower and a large cappuccino. You might as well fight them in yesterday’s underwear.”
    J.G. Ballard, Millennium People

  • #29
    J.G. Ballard
    “These people were the first to master a new kind of late twentieth-century life. They thrived on the rapid turnover of acquaintances, the lack of involvement with others, and the total self-sufficiency of lives which, needing nothing, were never disappointed.”
    J.G. Ballard

  • #30
    J.G. Ballard
    “The American Dream has run out of gas. The car has stopped. It no longer supplies the world with its images, its dreams, its fantasies. No more. It's over. It supplies the world with its nightmares now: the Kennedy assassination, Watergate, Vietnam...”
    J. G. Ballard



Rss
« previous 1 3 4 5 6