Sangeeta Behera > Sangeeta's Quotes

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  • #1
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #2
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “People understand me so poorly that they don't even understand my complaint about them not understanding me.”
    Søren Kierkegaard, The Journals of Kierkegaard

  • #3
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “The most common form of despair is not being who you are.”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #4
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “The greatest hazard of all, losing one’s self, can occur very quietly in the world, as if it were nothing at all. No other loss can occur so quietly; any other loss - an arm, a leg, five dollars, a wife, etc. - is sure to be noticed.”
    Søren Kierkegaard, The Sickness Unto Death: A Christian Psychological Exposition for Upbuilding and Awakening

  • #5
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “I see it all perfectly; there are two possible situations — one can either do this or that. My honest opinion and my friendly advice is this: do it or do not do it — you will regret both.”
    Soren Kierkegaard, Either/Or: A Fragment of Life

  • #6
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “The most painful state of being is remembering the future, particularly the one you'll never have.”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #7
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “What is a poet? An unhappy man who hides deep anguish in his heart, but whose lips are so formed that when the sigh and cry pass through them, it sounds like lovely music.... And people flock around the poet and say: 'Sing again soon' - that is, 'May new sufferings torment your soul but your lips be fashioned as before, for the cry would only frighten us, but the music, that is blissful.”
    Soren Kierkegaard, Either/Or

  • #8
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “Love is the expression of the one who loves, not of the one who is loved. Those who think they can love only the people they prefer do not love at all. Love discovers truths about individuals that others cannot see”
    Soren Kierkegaard

  • #9
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “Marry, and you will regret it; don’t marry, you will also regret it; marry or don’t marry, you will regret it either way. Laugh at the world’s foolishness, you will regret it; weep over it, you will regret that too; laugh at the world’s foolishness or weep over it, you will regret both. Believe a woman, you will regret it; believe her not, you will also regret it… Hang yourself, you will regret it; do not hang yourself, and you will regret that too; hang yourself or don’t hang yourself, you’ll regret it either way; whether you hang yourself or do not hang yourself, you will regret both. This, gentlemen, is the essence of all philosophy.”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #10
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “How did I get into the world? Why was I not asked about it and why was I not informed of the rules and regulations but just thrust into the ranks as if I had been bought by a peddling shanghaier of human beings? How did I get involved in this big enterprise called actuality? Why should I be involved? Isn't it a matter of choice? And if I am compelled to be involved, where is the manager—I have something to say about this. Is there no manager? To whom shall I make my complaint?”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #11
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “It is perhaps the misfortune of my life that I am interested in far too much but not decisively in any one thing; all my interests are not subordinated in one but stand on an equal footing.”
    Soren Kierkegaard

  • #12
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “My melancholy is the most faithful mistress I have known; what wonder, then, that I love her in return.”
    Søren Kierkegaard, Either/Or: A Fragment of Life

  • #13
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “Don't you know that a midnight hour comes when everyone has to take off his mask? Do you think life always lets itself be trifled with? Do you think you can sneak off a little before midnight to escape this?”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #14
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “Boredom is the root of all evil - the despairing refusal to be oneself.”
    Soren Kierkegaard

  • #15
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “One must not think slightingly of the paradoxical…for the paradox is the source of the thinker’s passion, and the thinker without a paradox is like a lover without feeling: a paltry mediocrity.”
    Soren Kierkegaard

  • #16
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “The self-assured believer is a greater sinner in the eyes of God than the troubled disbeliever.”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #17
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “Listen to the cry of a woman in labor at the hour of giving birth — look at the dying man’s struggle at his last extremity, and then tell me whether something that begins and ends thus could be intended for enjoyment.”
    Soren Kierkegaard
    tags: life

  • #18
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “Happiness is the greatest hiding place for despair.”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #19
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “My sorrow is my castle.”
    Soren Kierkegaard

  • #20
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    “Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson, Emerson in His Journals

  • #21
    Jeanette Winterson
    “What should I do about the wild and the tame? The wild heart that wants to be free, and the tame heart that wants to come home. I want to be held. I don't want you to come too close. I want you to scoop me up and bring me home at nights. I don't want to tell you where I am. I want to keep a place among the rocks where no one can find me. I want to be with you.”
    Jeanette Winterson

  • #22
    Naguib Mahfouz
    “It's a most distressing affliction to have a sentimental heart and a skeptical mind.”
    Naguib Mahfouz, Sugar Street

  • #23
    George Orwell
    “To know and not to know, to be conscious of complete truthfulness while telling carefully constructed lies, to hold simultaneously two opinions which cancelled out, knowing them to be contradictory and believing in both of them, to use logic against logic, to repudiate morality while laying claim to it, to believe that democracy was impossible and that the Party was the guardian of democracy, to forget whatever it was necessary to forget, then to draw it back into memory again at the moment when it was needed, and then promptly to forget it again: and above all, to apply the same process to the process itself -- that was the ultimate subtlety: consciously to induce unconsciousness, and then, once again, to become unconscious of the act of hypnosis you had just performed. Even to understand the word 'doublethink' involved the use of doublethink.”
    George Orwell, 1984

  • #24
    Erwin Schrödinger
    “If a man never contradicts himself, the reason must be that he virtually never says anything at all.”
    Erwin Schrödinger, What Is Life? with Mind and Matter and Autobiographical Sketches

  • #25
    Ernest Becker
    “...Erich Fromm wondered why most people did not become insane in the face of the existential contradiction between a symbolic self, that seems to give man infinite worth in a timeless scheme of things, and a body that is worth about 98¢.”
    Ernest Becker, The Denial of Death

  • #26
    Heinrich Heine
    “Where words leave off, music begins.”
    Heinrich Heine

  • #27
    Heinrich Heine
    “Ordinarily he was insane, but he had lucid moments when he was merely stupid”
    Heinrich Heine

  • #28
    Heinrich Heine
    “There are more fools in the world than there are people.”
    Heinrich Heine
    tags: fools

  • #29
    Heinrich Heine
    “Mine is a most peaceable disposition. My wishes are: a humble cottage with a thatched roof, but a good bed, good food, the freshest milk and butter, flowers before my window, and a few fine trees before my door; and if God wants to make my happiness complete, he will grant me the joy of seeing some six or seven of my enemies hanging from those trees. Before death I shall, moved in my heart, forgive them all the wrong they did me in their lifetime. One must, it is true, forgive one's enemies-- but not before they have been hanged.”
    Heinrich Heine

  • #30
    Heinrich Heine
    “Nature knows no indecencies; man invents them.”
    Heinrich Heine



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