Terry Tyler > Terry's Quotes

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  • #1
    Terry Pratchett
    “Give a man a fire and he's warm for a day, but set fire to him and he's warm for the rest of his life.”
    Terry Pratchett, Jingo

  • #2
    Bill Bryson
    “As my father always used to tell me, 'You see, son, there's always someone in the world worse off than you.' And I always used to think, 'So?”
    Bill Bryson, The Lost Continent: Travels in Small Town America

  • #3
    Bill Bryson
    “I mused for a few moments on the question of which was worse, to lead a life so boring that you are easily enchanted, or a life so full of stimulus that you are easily bored.”
    Bill Bryson, The Lost Continent

  • #4
    Henry James
    “Three things in human life are important: the first is to be kind; the second is to be kind; and the third is to be kind.”
    Henry James

  • #5
    Barbara Taylor Bradford
    “Always present yourself as a woman who expects to succeed.”
    Barbara Taylor Bradford, Playing the Game

  • #6
    Marcus Tullius Cicero
    “A room without books is like a body without a soul.”
    Marcus Tullius Cicero

  • #7
    Frank Zappa
    “So many books, so little time.”
    Frank Zappa

  • #8
    Eleanor Roosevelt
    “No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”
    Eleanor Roosevelt, This is My Story

  • #9
    Joseph Brodsky
    “There are worse crimes than burning books. One of them is not reading them.”
    Joseph Brodsky

  • #10
    Douglas Adams
    “The story so far:
    In the beginning the Universe was created.
    This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.”
    Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe

  • #11
    “Writing style can be descriptive without being wordy - and wordy without being descriptive”
    Rayne Hall

  • #12
    Bede
    “The present life of man upon earth, O King, seems to me in comparison with that time which is unknown to us like the swift flight of a sparrow through the mead-hall where you sit at supper in winter, with your Ealdormen and thanes, while the fire blazes in the midst and the hall is warmed, but the wintry storms of rain or snow are raging abroad. The sparrow, flying in at one door and immediately out at another, whilst he is within, is safe from the wintry tempest, but after a short space of fair weather, he immediately vanishes out of your sight, passing from winter to winter again. So this life of man appears for a little while, but of what is to follow or what went before we know nothing at all.”
    St. Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People

  • #13
    Terry Tyler
    “Once shit on, twice shy," Jan”
    Terry Tyler, Best Seller



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