Claire > Claire's Quotes

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  • #1
    “You should date a girl who reads.
    Date a girl who reads. Date a girl who spends her money on books instead of clothes, who has problems with closet space because she has too many books. Date a girl who has a list of books she wants to read, who has had a library card since she was twelve.

    Find a girl who reads. You’ll know that she does because she will always have an unread book in her bag. She’s the one lovingly looking over the shelves in the bookstore, the one who quietly cries out when she has found the book she wants. You see that weird chick sniffing the pages of an old book in a secondhand book shop? That’s the reader. They can never resist smelling the pages, especially when they are yellow and worn.

    She’s the girl reading while waiting in that coffee shop down the street. If you take a peek at her mug, the non-dairy creamer is floating on top because she’s kind of engrossed already. Lost in a world of the author’s making. Sit down. She might give you a glare, as most girls who read do not like to be interrupted. Ask her if she likes the book.

    Buy her another cup of coffee.

    Let her know what you really think of Murakami. See if she got through the first chapter of Fellowship. Understand that if she says she understood James Joyce’s Ulysses she’s just saying that to sound intelligent. Ask her if she loves Alice or she would like to be Alice.

    It’s easy to date a girl who reads. Give her books for her birthday, for Christmas, for anniversaries. Give her the gift of words, in poetry and in song. Give her Neruda, Pound, Sexton, Cummings. Let her know that you understand that words are love. Understand that she knows the difference between books and reality but by god, she’s going to try to make her life a little like her favorite book. It will never be your fault if she does.

    She has to give it a shot somehow.

    Lie to her. If she understands syntax, she will understand your need to lie. Behind words are other things: motivation, value, nuance, dialogue. It will not be the end of the world.

    Fail her. Because a girl who reads knows that failure always leads up to the climax. Because girls who read understand that all things must come to end, but that you can always write a sequel. That you can begin again and again and still be the hero. That life is meant to have a villain or two.

    Why be frightened of everything that you are not? Girls who read understand that people, like characters, develop. Except in the Twilight series.

    If you find a girl who reads, keep her close. When you find her up at 2 AM clutching a book to her chest and weeping, make her a cup of tea and hold her. You may lose her for a couple of hours but she will always come back to you. She’ll talk as if the characters in the book are real, because for a while, they always are.

    You will propose on a hot air balloon. Or during a rock concert. Or very casually next time she’s sick. Over Skype.

    You will smile so hard you will wonder why your heart hasn’t burst and bled out all over your chest yet. You will write the story of your lives, have kids with strange names and even stranger tastes. She will introduce your children to the Cat in the Hat and Aslan, maybe in the same day. You will walk the winters of your old age together and she will recite Keats under her breath while you shake the snow off your boots.

    Date a girl who reads because you deserve it. You deserve a girl who can give you the most colorful life imaginable. If you can only give her monotony, and stale hours and half-baked proposals, then you’re better off alone. If you want the world and the worlds beyond it, date a girl who reads.

    Or better yet, date a girl who writes.”
    Rosemarie Urquico

  • #2
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer
    “We must learn to regard people less in the light of what they do or omit to do, and more in the light of what they suffer.”
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Letters and Papers from Prison

  • #3
    Daniel J. Rice
    “When I returned to camp, they walked behind me on the trail, and we spoke not a word about getting skunked today, but rather talked about the days we returned with a stringer full of fish, and how we filleted them and the left the guts out for bears and eagles, and how those fish tasted fresh when we fried them over a fire.”
    Daniel J. Rice, The Unpeopled Season: Journal from a North Country Wilderness

  • #4
    C.S. Lewis
    “The sweetest thing in all my life has been the longing — to reach the Mountain, to find the place where all the beauty came from — my country, the place where I ought to have been born. Do you think it all meant nothing, all the longing? The longing for home? For indeed it now feels not like going, but like going back.”
    C. S. Lewis, Till We Have Faces

  • #5
    C.S. Lewis
    “If we find ourselves with a desire that nothing in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that we were made for another world.”
    C.S. Lewis

  • #6
    Peter Kreeft
    “We all, like Frodo, carry a Quest, a Task: our daily duties. They come to us, not from us. We are free only to accept or refuse our task- and, implicitly, our Taskmaster. None of us is a free creator or designer of his own life. "None of us lives to himself, and none of us dies to himself" (Rom 14:7). Either God, or fate, or meaningless chance has laid upon each of us a Task, a Quest, which we would not have chosen for ourselves. We are all Hobbits who love our Shire, or security, our creature comforts, whether these are pipeweed, mushrooms, five meals a day, and local gossip, or Starbucks coffees, recreational sex, and politics. But something, some authority not named in The Lord of the Rings (but named in the Silmarillion), has decreed that a Quest should interrupt this delightful Epicurean garden and send us on an odyssey. We are plucked out of our Hobbit holes and plunked down onto a Road.”
    Peter Kreeft, The Philosophy of Tolkien: The Worldview Behind The Lord of the Rings

  • #7
    Peter Kreeft
    “Everything smaller than Heaven bores us because only Heaven is bigger than our hearts.”
    Peter Kreeft, Jesus-Shock

  • #8
    Peter Kreeft
    “Reading a book about something can be an obstacle to doing it because it gives you the impression that you are doing what you are only thinking about doing. It is tempting to remain in the comfortable theater of our imagination instead of the real world, to fall in love with the idea of becoming a saint and loving God and neighbor instead of doing the actual work, because the idea makes no demands on you. It is like a book on a shelf. But, as Dostoyevsky says, 'love in action is a harsh and dreadful thing compared to love in dreams' (The Brothers Karamazov).”
    Peter Kreeft, Prayer For Beginners

  • #9
    Peter Kreeft
    “Protestants believe that the sacraments are like ladders that God gave to us by which we can climb up to Him. Catholics believe that they are like ladders that God gave to Himself by which He climbs down to us.”
    Peter Kreeft, Jesus-Shock

  • #10
    G.K. Chesterton
    “...the function of imagination is not to make strange things settled, so much as to make settled things strange; not so much to make wonders facts as to make facts wonders.”
    G.K. Chesterton, The Defendant

  • #11
    Augustine of Hippo
    “To fall in love with God is the greatest romance; to seek him the greatest adventure; to find him, the greatest human achievement.”
    St. Augustine of Hippo

  • #12
    Theodore Roethke
    The Waking

    I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.
    I feel my fate in what I cannot fear.
    I learn by going where I have to go.

    We think by feeling. What is there to know?
    I hear my being dance from ear to ear.
    I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.

    Of those so close beside me, which are you?
    God bless the Ground! I shall walk softly there,
    And learn by going where I have to go.

    Light takes the Tree; but who can tell us how?
    The lowly worm climbs up a winding stair;
    I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.

    Great Nature has another thing to do
    To you and me, so take the lively air,
    And, lovely, learn by going where to go.

    This shaking keeps me steady. I should know.
    What falls away is always. And is near.
    I wake to sleep, and take my waking slow.
    I learn by going where I have to go.”
    Theodore Roethke, The Collected Poems

  • #13
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer
    “In a word, live together in the forgiveness of your sins, for without it no human fellowship, least of all a marriage, can survive. Don’t insist on your rights, don’t blame each other, don’t judge or condemn each other, don’t find fault with each other, but accept each other as you are, and forgive each other every day from the bottom of your hearts…”
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Letters and Papers from Prison

  • #14
    C.S. Lewis
    “Being in love is a good thing, but it is not the best thing. There are many things below it, but there are also things above it. You cannot make it the basis of a whole life. It is a noble feeling, but it is still a feeling. Now no feeling can be relied on to last in its full intensity, or even to last at all. Knowledge can last, principles can last, habits can last but feelings come and go. And in fact, whatever people say, the state called ‘being in love’ usually does not last. If the old fairy-tale ending ‘They lived happily ever after’ is taken to mean ‘They felt for the next fifty years exactly as they felt the day before they were married,’ then it says what probably never was nor ever would be true, and would be highly undesirable if it were. Who could bear to live in that excitement for even five years? What would become of your work, your appetite, your sleep, your friendships? But, of course, ceasing to be ‘in love’ need not mean ceasing to love. Love in this second sense — love as distinct from ‘being in love’ — is not merely a feeling. It is a deep unity, maintained by the will and deliberately strengthened by habit; reinforced by (in Christian marriages) the grace which both partners ask, and receive, from God. They can have this love for each other even at those moments when they do not like each other; as you love yourself even when you do not like yourself. They can retain this love even when each would easily, if they allowed themselves, be ‘in love’ with someone else. ‘Being in love’ first moved them to promise fidelity: this quieter love enables them to keep the promise. it is on this love that the engine of marriage is run: being in love was the explosion that started it.”
    C. S. Lewis
    tags: love

  • #15
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer
    “We ought not to be in too much of a hurry here to speak piously of God’s will and guidance. It is obvious, and it should not be ignored, that it is your own very human wills that are at work here, celebrating their triumph; the course that you are taking at the outset is one that you have chosen for yourselves…”
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Letters and Papers from Prison

  • #16
    Marcus Aurelius
    “Waste no more time arguing about what a good man should be. Be one.”
    Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

  • #17
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    “Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson, Self-Reliance

  • #18
    Henry James
    “I don't want everyone to like me; I should think less of myself if some people did.”
    Henry James

  • #19
    William  James
    “A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices.”
    William James

  • #20
    Samuel Johnson
    “There can be no friendship without confidence, and no confidence without integrity.”
    Samuel Johnson

  • #21
    Henry Adams
    “No man means all he says, and yet very few say all they mean, for words are slippery and thought is viscous.”
    Henry Adams, The Education of Henry Adams

  • #22
    Thomas S. Monson
    “Remember that the mantle of leadership is not the cloak of comfort, but the robe of responsibility. Accountability is not for the intention but for the deed. You must continue to choose the harder right, instead of the easier wrong.”
    Thomas S. Monson

  • #23
    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
    “People have forgotten this truth," the fox said. "But you mustn’t forget it. You become responsible forever for what you’ve tamed. You’re responsible for your rose.”
    Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

  • #24
    Winston S. Churchill
    “The price of greatness is responsibility.”
    Winston Churchill

  • #25
    George Bernard Shaw
    “Liberty means responsibility. That is why most men dread it.”
    George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman

  • #26
    Mark Twain
    “It is curious that physical courage should be so common in the world and moral courage so rare.”
    Mark Twain

  • #27
    Sophocles
    “All men make mistakes, but a good man yields when he knows his course is wrong, and repairs the evil. The only crime is pride.”
    Sophocles, Antigone

  • #28
    John Burroughs
    “One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this: ‘To rise above little things’.”
    John Burroughs

  • #29
    Seneca
    “Difficulties strengthen the mind, as labor does the body.”
    Lucius Annaeus Seneca

  • #30
    Clayton M. Christensen
    “Decide what you stand for. And then stand for it all the time.”
    Clayton Christensen



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