Graham Edward > Graham's Quotes

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  • #1
    Attica Locke
    “Ronnie “Redrum” Malvo was a tatted-up cracker with ties to the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas, a criminal organization that made money off meth production and the sale of illegal guns—a gang whose only initiation rite was to kill a nigger.”
    Attica Locke, Bluebird, Bluebird

  • #2
    Randy Shilts
    “How very American, he thought, to look at a disease as homosexual or heterosexual, as if viruses had the intelligence to choose between different inclinations of human behavior.”
    Randy Shilts, And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic

  • #3
    Randy Shilts
    “What society judged was not the severity of the disease but the social acceptability of the individuals affected with it…”
    Randy Shilts, And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic

  • #4
    Randy Shilts
    “We will not have any of these cases in the Soviet Union,” said a Soviet delegate confidently. Don Francis couldn’t resist saying to Marc Conant in his loudest stage whisper, “And they won’t, all right.” In a stern Russian accent, Francis continued: “You have AIDS—bang, bang, bang.” The Soviets were not amused.”
    Randy Shilts, And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic

  • #5
    Joshua Wolf Shenk
    “Lincoln's story confounds those who see depression as a collection of symptoms to be eliminated. But it resonates with those who see suffering as a potential catalyst of emotional growth. "What man actually needs," the psychiatrist Victor Frankl argued,"is not a tension-less state but rather the striving and struggling of a worthwhile goal." Many believe that psychological health comes with the relief of distress. But Frankl proposed that all people-- and particularly those under some emotional weight-- need a purpose that will both draw on their talents and transcend their lives. For Lincoln, this sense of purpose was indeed the key that unlocked the gates of a mental prison. This doesn't mean his suffering went away. In fact, as his life became richer and more satisfying, his melancholy exerted a stronger pull. He now responded to that pull by tying it to his newly defined sense of purpose. From a place of trouble, he looked for meaning. He looked at imperfection and sought redemption.”
    Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

  • #6
    Joshua Wolf Shenk
    “Why is it that all men who have become outstanding in philosophy, statesmanship, poetry or the arts are melancholic,”
    Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

  • #7
    Joshua Wolf Shenk
    “When a depressed person does get out of bed, it’s usually not with a sudden insight that life is rich and valuable, but out of some creeping sense of duty or instinct for survival. If collapsing is sometimes vital, so is the brute force of will. To William James we owe the insight that, in the absence of real health, we sometimes must act as if we are healthy. Buoyed by such discipline and habit, we might achieve actual well-being.”
    Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

  • #8
    Joshua Wolf Shenk
    “A person with a melancholy temperament had been fated with both an awful burden and what Byron called “a fearful gift.” The burden was a sadness and despair that could tip into a state of disease. But the gift was a capacity for depth, wisdom—even genius.”
    Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

  • #9
    Joshua Wolf Shenk
    “In his seminal book, Man’s Search for Meaning, the psychiatrist Victor Frankl described the essence of what has come to be known as an existential approach to the human condition with this metaphor: “If architects want to strengthen a decrepit arch,” he wrote, “they increase the load which is laid upon it, for thereby the parts are joined more firmly together.” It is similarly true, he said, that therapy aimed at fostering mental health often should lay increased weight on a patient, creating what he described as “a sound amount of tension through a reorientation toward the meaning of one’s own life.”
    Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

  • #10
    Joshua Wolf Shenk
    “One crucial distinction between major depression and chronic depression is that, in the latter, one largely ceases to howl in protest that the world is hard or painful. Rather, one becomes accustomed to it, expecting such hardship and greeting it with, at best, a stoic determination.”
    Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

  • #11
    Joshua Wolf Shenk
    “The inclination to exchange thoughts with one another is probably an original impulse of our nature. If I be in pain I wish to let you know it, and to ask your sympathy and assistance; and my pleasurable emotions also, I wish to communicate to, and share with you. —ABRAHAM LINCOLN, February 11, 1859”
    Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

  • #12
    Joshua Wolf Shenk
    “Whatever greatness Lincoln achieved cannot be explained as a triumph over personal suffering. Rather, it must be accounted for as an outgrowth of the same system that produced that suffering. This is not a story of transformation but one of integration. Lincoln didn’t do great work because he solved the problem of his melancholy. The problem of his melancholy was all the more fuel for the fire of his great work.”
    Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

  • #13
    Joshua Wolf Shenk
    “It is a signal feature of depression that, in times of trouble, sensible ideas, memories of good times, and optimism for the future all recede into blackness.”
    Joshua Wolf Shenk, Lincoln's Melancholy: How Depression Challenged a President and Fueled His Greatness

  • #14
    Jon Meacham
    “Jackson was a transformative president in part because he had a transcendent personality; other presidents who followed him were not transformative, and served unremarkably.”
    Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House

  • #15
    Jon Meacham
    “Or, as Jackson would have said: The people, sir-the people will set things right.”
    Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House

  • #16
    Jon Meacham
    “Steadiness of faith, was, in the long run, as illuminating and essential as sophistication of thought.”
    Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House

  • #17
    Jon Meacham
    “With a writer's eye, Irving detected Jackson's depths. "As his admirers say, he is truly an old Roman-to which I would add, with a little dash of the Greek; for I suspect he is as knowing as I believe he is honest.”
    Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House

  • #18
    Jon Meacham
    “Politics was at once clinical and human, driven by principles and passions that he (the leader) had to master and harness for the good of the whole.”
    Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House

  • #19
    Jon Meacham
    “He was the most contradictory of men. A champion of extending freedom and democracy to even the poorest of whites, Jackson was an unrepentant slaveholder. A sentimental man who rescued an Indian orphan on a battlefield to raise in his home, Jackson was responsible for the removal of Indian tribes from their ancestral lands. An enemy of Eastern financial elites and a relentless opponent of the Bank of the United States, which he believed to be a bastion of corruption, Jackson also promised to die, if necessary, to preserve the power and prestige of the central government. Like us and our America, Jackson and his America achieved great things while committing grievous sins.”
    Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House

  • #20
    Jon Meacham
    “I believe after a series of years that no government that has the power to collect taxes and declare war, can be restrained but by a display of sufficient power to break it up,” Pickens said.”
    Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House

  • #21
    Lawrence Wright
    “Religion is always an irrational enterprise, no matter how ennobling it may be to the human spirit.”
    Lawrence Wright, Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief

  • #22
    Lawrence Wright
    “Dianetics, Hayakawa noted, was neither science nor fiction, but something else: “fictional science.”
    Lawrence Wright, Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief

  • #23
    Lawrence Wright
    “VERY EARLY ONE MORNING in July 1977, the FBI, having been tipped off about Operation Snow White, carried out raids on Scientology offices in Los Angeles and Washington, DC, carting off nearly fifty thousand documents. One of the files was titled “Operation Freakout.” It concerned the treatment of Paulette Cooper, the journalist who had published an exposé of Scientology, The Scandal of Scientology, six years earlier. After having been indicted for perjury and making bomb threats against Scientology, Cooper had gone into a deep depression. She stopped eating. At one point, she weighed just eighty-three pounds. She considered suicide. Finally, she persuaded a doctor to give her sodium pentothal, or “truth serum,” and question her under the anesthesia. The government was sufficiently impressed that the prosecutor dropped the case against her, but her reputation was ruined, she was broke, and her health was uncertain. The day after the FBI raid on the Scientology headquarters, Cooper was flying back from Africa, on assignment for a travel magazine, when she read a story in the International Herald Tribune about the raid. One of the files the federal agents discovered was titled “Operation Freakout.” The goal of the operation was to get Cooper “incarcerated in a mental institution or jail.”
    Lawrence Wright, Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief

  • #24
    Lawrence Wright
    “Science fiction invites the writer to grandly explore alternative worlds and pose questions about meaning and destiny.”
    Lawrence Wright, Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief

  • #25
    Lawrence Wright
    “In the United States, constitutional guarantees of religious liberty protect the church from actions that might otherwise be considered abusive or in violation of laws in human trafficking or labor standards.”
    Lawrence Wright, Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief

  • #26
    Jill Lepore
    “One Half of the World does not know how the other Half lives,” Franklin once wrote. His sister is his other Half.”
    Jill Lepore, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

  • #27
    Jill Lepore
    “The virtue she valued most was faith. It had no place on Franklin’s list. She placed her trust in Providence. He placed his faith in man.”
    Jill Lepore, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

  • #28
    Jill Lepore
    “He counted thirteen virtues: temperance, silence, order, resolution, frugality, industry, sincerity, justice, moderation, cleanliness, tranquillity, chastity, and humility. Soon”
    Jill Lepore, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

  • #29
    Jill Lepore
    “By the Collision of different Sentiments,” Franklin wrote, “Sparks of Truth are struck out, and political Light is obtained.”
    Jill Lepore, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin

  • #30
    Jill Lepore
    “For having lived long, I have experienced many instances of being obliged by better information, or fuller consideration, to change opinions even on important subjects, which I once thought right, but found to be otherwise.”
    Jill Lepore, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin



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