Stanislavskij > Stanislavskij's Quotes

(showing 1-30 of 51)
« previous 1
sort by

  • #1
    David Foster Wallace
    “The next suitable person you’re in light conversation with, you stop suddenly in the middle of the conversation and look at the person closely and say, “What’s wrong?” You say it in a concerned way. He’ll say, “What do you mean?” You say, “Something’s wrong. I can tell. What is it?” And he’ll look stunned and say, “How did you know?” He doesn’t realize something’s always wrong, with everybody. Often more than one thing. He doesn’t know everybody’s always going around all the time with something wrong and believing they’re exerting great willpower and control to keep other people, for whom they think nothing’s ever wrong, from seeing it.”
    David Foster Wallace, The Pale King

  • #2
    David Foster Wallace
    “The really important kind of freedom involves attention, and awareness, and discipline, and effort, and being able truly to care about other people and to sacrifice for them, over and over, in myriad petty little unsexy ways, every day.”
    David Foster Wallace, This Is Water: Some Thoughts, Delivered on a Significant Occasion, about Living a Compassionate Life

  • #3
    David Foster Wallace
    “I had kind of a midlife crisis at twenty which probably doesn’t augur well for my longevity”
    David Foster Wallace

  • #4
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “My life is absolutely meaningless. When I consider the different periods into which it falls, it seems like the word Schnur in the dictionary, which means in the first place a string, in the second, a daughter-in-law. The only thing lacking is that the word Schnur should mean in the third place a camel, in the fourth, a dust-brush.”
    Søren Kierkegaard, Either/Or: A Fragment of Life

  • #5
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “Truth always rests with the minority, and the minority is always stronger than the majority, because the minority is generally formed by those who really have an opinion, while the strength of a majority is illusory, formed by the gangs who have no opinion — and who, therefore, in the next instant (when it is evident that the minority is the stronger) assume its opinion… while truth again reverts to a new minority.”
    Søren Kierkegaard

  • #6
    Søren Kierkegaard
    “Listen to the cry of a woman in labor at the hour of giving birth — look at the dying man’s struggle at his last extremity, and then tell me whether something that begins and ends thus could be intended for enjoyment.”
    Søren Kierkegaard
    tags: life

  • #7
    Vladimir Nabokov
    “I think it is all a matter of love; the more you love a memory the stronger and stranger it becomes”
    Vladimir Nabokov

  • #8
    Vladimir Nabokov
    “It was love at first sight, at last sight, at ever and ever sight.”
    Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

  • #9
    Vladimir Nabokov
    “He broke my heart. You merely broke my life.”
    Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

  • #10
    Vladimir Nabokov
    “Don't cry, I'm sorry to have deceived you so much, but that's how life is.”
    Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita

  • #11
    Aldous Huxley
    “I want to know what passion is. I want to feel something strongly.”
    Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

  • #12
    Aldous Huxley
    “Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly -- they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.”
    Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

  • #13
    Aldous Huxley
    “I am I, and I wish I weren't.”
    Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

  • #14
    Aldous Huxley
    “If one's different, one's bound to be lonely.”
    Aldous Huxley, Brave New World

  • #15
    George Orwell
    “Within certain limits, it is actually true that the less money you have, the less you worry.”
    George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London

  • #16
    George Orwell
    “It is curious how people take it for granted that they have a right to preach at you and pray over you as soon as your income falls below a certain level.”
    George Orwell, Down and Out in Paris and London

  • #17
    Virginia Woolf
    “She had the perpetual sense, as she watched the taxi cabs, of being out, out, far out to sea and alone; she always had the feeling that it was very, very, dangerous to live even one day.”
    Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

  • #18
    Virginia Woolf
    “Did it matter then, she asked herself, walking towards Bond Street, did it matter that she must inevitably cease completely? All this must go on without her; did she resent it; or did it not become consoling to believe that death ended absolutely?”
    Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

  • #19
    Virginia Woolf
    “He thought her beautiful, believed her impeccably wise; dreamed of her, wrote poems to her, which, ignoring the subject, she corrected in red ink.”
    Virginia Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway

  • #20
    Julian Barnes
    “History is that certainty produced at the point where the imperfections of memory meet the inadequacies of documentation.”
    Julian Barnes, The Sense of an Ending

  • #21
    Julian Barnes
    “It strikes me that this may be one of the differences between youth and age: when we are young, we invent different futures for ourselves; when we are old, we invent different pasts for others.”
    Julian Barnes, The Sense of an Ending

  • #22
    Neil Postman
    “We were keeping our eye on 1984. When the year came and the prophecy didn't, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.

    But we had forgotten that alongside Orwell's dark vision, there was another - slightly older, slightly less well known, equally chilling: Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Contrary to common belief even among the educated, Huxley and Orwell did not prophesy the same thing. Orwell warns that we will be overcome by an externally imposed oppression. But in Huxley's vision, no Big Brother is required to deprive people of their autonomy, maturity and history. As he saw it, people will come to love their oppression, to adore the technologies that undo their capacities to think.

    What Orwell feared were those who would ban books. What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book, for there would be no one who wanted to read one. Orwell feared those who would deprive us of information. Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism. Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us. Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance. Orwell feared we would become a captive culture. Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture, preoccupied with some equivalent of the feelies, the orgy porgy, and the centrifugal bumblepuppy. As Huxley remarked in Brave New World Revisited, the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny "failed to take into account man's almost infinite appetite for distractions." In 1984, Orwell added, people are controlled by inflicting pain. In Brave New World, they are controlled by inflicting pleasure. In short, Orwell feared that what we fear will ruin us. Huxley feared that what we desire will ruin us.

    This book is about the possibility that Huxley, not Orwell, was right.”
    Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business

  • #23
    Robert Browning
    “When the fight begins within himself, a man's worth something.”
    Robert Browning

  • #24
    T.S. Eliot
    “This is the way the world ends
    Not with a bang but a whimper.”
    T.S. Eliot

  • #25
    T.S. Eliot
    “Do I dare
    Disturb the universe?
    In a minute there is time
    For decisions and revisions which a minute will reverse.”
    T.S. Eliot

  • #26
    T.S. Eliot
    “For I have known them all already, known them all—
    Have known the evenings, mornings, afternoons,
    I have measured out my life with coffee spoons.”
    T.S. Eliot, The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock and Others
    tags: life

  • #27
    T.S. Eliot
    “We die to each other daily. What we know of other people is only our memory of the moments during which we knew them. And they have changed since then. To pretend that they and we are the same is a useful and convenient social convention which must sometimes be broken. We must also remember that at every meeting we are meeting a stranger.”
    T.S. Eliot, The Cocktail Party

  • #28
    T.S. Eliot
    “April is the cruelest month, breeding
    lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
    memory and desire, stirring
    dull roots with spring rain.”
    T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land

  • #29
    T.S. Eliot
    “I will show you fear in a handful of dust.”
    T.S. Eliot

  • #30
    T.S. Eliot
    “The very existence of libraries affords the best evidence that we may yet have hope for the future of man”
    T.S. Eliot



Rss
« previous 1
All Quotes