Kirk > Kirk's Quotes

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  • #1
    Jane Austen
    “I could not sit seriously down to write a serious Romance under any other motive than to save my life, & if it were indispensable for me to keep it up & never relax into laughing at myself or other people, I am sure I should be hung before I had finished the first chapter. No - I must keep my own style & go on in my own way; and though I may never succeed again in that, I am convinced that I should totally fail in any other.”
    Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters

  • #2
    Helen Fielding
    “It struck me as pretty ridiculous to be called Mr. Darcy and to stand on your own looking snooty at a party. It's like being called Heathcliff and insisting on spending the entire evening in the garden, shouting "Cathy" and banging your head against a tree.”
    Helen Fielding, Bridget Jones's Diary

  • #3
    Laurence Sterne
    “What a large volume of adventures may be grasped within the span of his little life by him who interests his heart in everything.”
    Laurence Sterne

  • #4
    “A great work of art is one that continues to repay attention.”
    Christopher Ricks

  • #5
    Jane Austen
    “The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.”
    Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey

  • #6
    Jane Austen
    “I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.”
    Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters

  • #7
    Jane Austen
    “I will not say that your mulberry trees are dead; but I am afraid they're not alive. ”
    Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters

  • #8
    Jane Austen
    “Here I am once more in this scene of dissipation and vice, and I begin already to find my morals corrupted."
    -- Jane Austen's Letters August 1796”
    Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters

  • #9
    Jane Austen
    “Walter Scott has no business to write novels, especially good ones. — It is not fair. — He has fame and profit enough as a poet, and should not be taking the bread out of other people’s mouths. — I do not like him, and do not mean to like Waverley if I can help it — but fear I must.”
    Jane Austen, Jane Austen's Letters

  • #10
    Jane Austen
    “You need not hurry when the object is only to prevent my saying a bon mot, for there is not the least wit in my nature. I am a very matter-of-fact, plain-spoken being, and may blunder on the borders of a repartee for half an hour together without striking it out.”
    Jane Austen, Mansfield Park

  • #11
    Jeanne Birdsall
    “Jane,' she said, climbing down from the chair. 'Remember last year when I built that model wind tower for you and you wrote those poems for me?'

    And you said you'd never switch homework assignments with me again.'

    For good reason. My teacher had a hard time believing I wrote Tra-la the joy of tulips blooming, Ha-ha the thrill of bumblebees zooming. I'm alive and I dance, I'm alive though death is always looming. When I finally convinced her that I had, she asked me if I needed to talk to the school counselor.”
    Jeanne Birdsall, The Penderwicks on Gardam Street

  • #12
    Jeanne Birdsall
    “I've been going insane reading my students' papers. Apparently several of them think the Hubble Space Telescope is used to search the universe for hubbles."
    ~ Ithana Aaronson”
    Jeanne Birdsall, The Penderwicks on Gardam Street

  • #13
    Johnny Cash
    “All your life, you will be faced with a choice. You can choose love or hate…I choose love.”
    Johnny Cash

  • #14
    David McCullough
    “To me, history ought to be a source of pleasure. It isn't just part of our civic responsibility. To me, it's an enlargement of the experience of being alive, just the way literature or art or music is."

    [The Title Always Comes Last; NEH 2003 Jefferson Lecturer interview profile]”
    David McCullough

  • #15
    David McCullough
    “Real success is finding your lifework in the work that you love.”
    David McCullough

  • #16
    David McCullough
    “Once upon a time in the dead of winter in the Dakota Territory, Theodore Roosevelt took off in a makeshift boat down the Little Missouri River in pursuit of a couple of thieves who had stolen his prized rowboat. After several days on the river, he caught up and got the draw on them with his trusty Winchester, at which point they surrendered. Then Roosevelt set off in a borrowed wagon to haul the thieves cross-country to justice. They headed across the snow-covered wastes of the Badlands to the railhead at Dickinson, and Roosevelt walked the whole way, the entire 40 miles. It was an astonishing feat, what might be called a defining moment in Roosevelt’s eventful life. But what makes it especially memorable is that during that time, he managed to read all of Anna Karenina. I often think of that when I hear people say they haven’t time to read.”
    David McCullough

  • #17
    David McCullough
    “History is a guide to navigation in perilous times. History is who we are and why we are the way we are. ”
    David McCullough

  • #18
    David McCullough
    “Writing is thinking. To write well is to think clearly. That's why it's so hard."

    (Interview with NEH chairman Bruce Cole, Humanities, July/Aug. 2002, Vol. 23/No. 4)”
    David McCullough

  • #19
    David McCullough
    “Nothing ever invented provides such sustenance, such infinite reward for time spent, as a good book.”
    David McCullough
    tags: books

  • #20
    David McCullough
    “If you get down about the state of American culture, just remember there are still more public libraries in this country than there are McDonalds.”
    David McCullough

  • #21
    David McCullough
    “Our obligations to our country never cease but with our lives. - John Adams”
    David McCullough, John Adams

  • #22
    David McCullough
    “You can't be a full participant in our democracy if you don't know our history.”
    David McCullough

  • #23
    David McCullough
    “When a friend of Abigail and John Adams was killed at Bunker Hill, Abigail's response was to write a letter to her husband and include these words, "My bursting heart must find vent at my pen.”
    David McCullough, John Adams

  • #24
    David McCullough
    “The longer I live, the more I read, the more patiently I think and the more anxiously I inquire, the less I seem to know...do justly. Love mercy. Walk humbly. This is enough.”
    David McCullough, John Adams

  • #25
    David McCullough
    “You've got to marinate your head, in that time and culture.
    You've got to become them."
    (Speaking about researching, and reading, and immersing yourself in History)”
    David McCullough, John Adams

  • #26
    David McCullough
    “I think that we need history as much as we need bread or water or love.”
    David McCullough

  • #27
    David McCullough
    “So, it was done, the break was made, in words at least: on July 2, 1776, in Philadelphia, the American colonies declared independence. If not all thirteen clocks had struck as one, twelve had, and with the other silent, the effect was the same.

    It was John Adams, more than anyone, who had made it happen. Further, he seems to have understood more clearly than any what a momentous day it was and in the privacy of two long letters to Abigail, he poured out his feelings as did no one else:

    The second day of July 1776 will be the most memorable epocha in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated as the Day of Deliverance by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations from one end of this continent to the other from this time forward forever more.”
    David McCullough, John Adams

  • #28
    Jane Austen
    “Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery. I quit such odious subjects as soon as I can, impatient to restore everybody not greatly in fault themselves to tolerable comfort, and to have done with all the rest.”
    Jane Austen, Mansfield Park

  • #29
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
    “Every man has his secret sorrows which the world knows not; and often times we call a man cold when he is only sad.”
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

  • #30
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
    “The love of learning, the sequestered nooks,
    And all the sweet serenity of books”
    Henry Wadsworth Longfellow



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