Theresa > Theresa's Quotes

Showing 1-13 of 13
sort by

  • #1
    Jack Kerouac
    “[...]the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes “Awww!”
    Jack Kerouac, On the Road

  • #2
    Jack Kerouac
    “My fault, my failure, is not in the passions I have, but in my lack of control of them.”
    Jack Kerouac

  • #3
    Jack Kerouac
    “I realized these were all the snapshots which our children would look at someday with wonder, thinking their parents had lived smooth, well-ordered lives and got up in the morning to walk proudly on the sidewalks of life, never dreaming the raggedy madness and riot of our actual lives, our actual night, the hell of it, the senseless emptiness.”
    Jack Kerouac, On the Road

  • #4
    Joseph Conrad
    “I remember my youth and the feeling that will never come back any more /the feeling that I could last for ever, outlast the sea, the earth, and all men; the deceitful feeling that lures us on to joys, to perils, to love, to vain effort /to death; the triumphant conviction of strength, the heat of life in the handful of dust, the glow in the heart that with every year grows dim, grows cold, grows small, and expires /and expires, too soon, too soon /before life itself”
    joseph conrad

  • #5
    Joseph Conrad
    “We live as we dream--alone....”
    Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

  • #6
    Joseph Conrad
    “I don't like work--no man does--but I like what is in the work--the chance to find yourself. Your own reality--for yourself not for others--what no other man can ever know. They can only see the mere show, and never can tell what it really means.”
    Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness
    tags: work

  • #7
    Joseph Conrad
    “No, it is impossible; it is impossible to convey the life-sensation of any given epoch of one’s existence--that which makes its truth, its meaning--its subtle and penetrating essence. It is impossible. We live, as we dream--alone.”
    Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness

  • #8
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “A woman should be able to kiss a man beautifully and romantically without any desire to be either his wife or his mistress.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Beautiful and Damned

  • #9
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “I fell in love with her courage, her sincerity, and her flaming self respect. And it's these things I'd believe in, even if the whole world indulged in wild suspicions that she wasn't all she should be. I love her and it is the beginning of everything.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald

  • #10
    F. Scott Fitzgerald
    “I'm not sentimental--I'm as romantic as you are. The idea, you know,
    is that the sentimental person thinks things will last--the romantic
    person has a desperate confidence that they won't.”
    F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

  • #11
    Ray Bradbury
    “Mr. Montag, you are looking at a coward. I saw the way things were going, a long time back. I said nothing. I’m one of the innocents who could have spoken up and out when no one would listen to the ‘guilty,’ but I did not speak and thus became guilty myself. And when finally they set the structure to burn the books, using the firemen, I grunted a few times and subsided, for there were no others grunting or yelling with me, by then. Now, it’s too late.”
    Ray Bradbury, Fahrenheit 451

  • #12
    J.D. Salinger
    “What I really felt like, though, was committing suicide. I felt like jumping out the window. I probably would've done it, too, if I'd been sure somebody'd cover me up as soon as I landed. I didn't want a bunch of stupid rubbernecks looking at me when I was all gory.”
    J.D. Salinger

  • #13
    David Foster Wallace
    “The horrific struggle to establish a human self results in a self whose humanity is inseparable from that horrific struggle: That our endless and impossible journey toward home is in fact our home.

    —David Foster Wallace, “Some Remarks on Kafka’s Funniness” (2005)”
    David Foster Wallace, Consider the Lobster and Other Essays



Rss