Tanvir Muntasim > Tanvir's Quotes

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  • #1
    Haruki Murakami
    “If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.”
    Haruki Murakami, Norwegian Wood

  • #2
    John Scalzi
    “For as much as I hate the cemetery, I’ve been grateful it’s here, too. I miss my wife. It’s easier to miss her at a cemetery, where she’s never been anything but dead, than to miss her in all the places where she was alive.”
    John Scalzi, Old Man's War

  • #3
    Jostein Gaarder
    “You can never know if a person forgives you when you wrong them. Therefore it is existentially important to you. It is a question you are intensely concerned with. Neither can you know whether a person loves you. It’s something you just have to believe or hope. But these things are more important to you than the fact that the sum of the angles in a triangle is 180 degrees. You don't think about the law of cause and effect or about modes of perception when you are in the middle of your first kiss.”
    Jostein Gaarder, Sophie's World

  • #4
    Jonathan Tropper
    “You never know when it will be the last time you'll see your father, or kiss your wife, or play with your little brother, but there's always a last time. If you could remember every last time, you'd never stop grieving.”
    Jonathan Tropper, This is Where I Leave You

  • #5
    Jo Nesbø
    “Losing your life is not the worst thing that can happen. The worst thing is to lose your reason for living.”
    Jo Nesbø

  • #6
    Jo Nesbø
    “It was the logic of retaliation that created the constitutional state. The enshrined promise of an eye for an eye, the sinner burning in hell or at least dangling for the gallows. Revenge is basically the foundation of civilization”
    Jo Nesbø

  • #7
    Jo Nesbø
    “Everyone has a need to do penance. It’s a basic need, like washing. It’s about harmony, an absolutely essential inner balance. It’s the balance we call morality.”
    Jo Nesbø

  • #8
    Jo Nesbø
    “A moral person is someone who accepts the consequences of their own morality, not those of others.”
    Jo Nesbø

  • #9
    Jo Nesbø
    “There’s only one thing worse than not satisfying a desire. And that is not to feel any desire.”
    Jo Nesbø

  • #10
    Jo Nesbø
    “Christian ethics demand that you should not take revenge. The paradox is, naturally, that Christians worship a God who is the greatest avenger of them all. Defy him and you burn in eternal hell, an act of revenge which is completely out of proportion to the crime”
    Jo Nesbø

  • #11
    Jo Nesbø
    “Revenge is the thinking man’s reflex, a complex blend of action and consistency no other animal species has so far succeeded in evolving. Evolutionary speaking, the practice of taking revenge has shown itself to the so effective that only the most vengeful of us have survived.”
    Jo Nesbø

  • #12
    David Nicholls
    “Find the thing you love, and do it with all your heart, to the absolute best of your ability, no matter what people say.”
    David Nicholls, The Understudy

  • #13
    Lois McMaster Bujold
    “Welcome to Barrayar, son. Here you go: have a world of wealth and poverty, wrenching change and rooted history. Have a birth; have two. Have a name. Miles means "soldier," but don't let the power of suggestion overwhelm you. Have a twisted form in a society that loathes and fears the mutations that have been its deepest agony. Have a title, wealth, power, and all the hatred and envy they will draw. Have your body ripped apart and re-arranged. Inherit an array of friends and enemies you never made. Have a grandfather from hell. Endure pain, find joy, and make your own meaning, because the universe certainly isn't going to supply it. Always be a moving target. Live. Live. Live.”
    Lois McMaster Bujold, Barrayar

  • #14
    Lois McMaster Bujold
    “All great human deeds both consume and transform their doers. Consider an athlete,or a scientist, or an independent business creator. in service of their goals they lay down time and energy and many other choices and pleasures; in return, they become most truly themselves. A false destiny may be spotted by the fact that it consumes without transforming, without giving back the enlarged self. Becoming a parent is one of these basic human transformational deeds. By this act, we change our fundamental relationship with the universe- if nothing else, we lose our place as the pinnacle and end-point of evolution, and become a mere link. The demands of motherhood especially consume the old self, and replace it with something new, often better and wiser, sometimes wearier or disillusioned, or tense and terrified, certainly more self-knowing, but never the same again.”
    Lois McMaster Bujold, Cordelia's Honor

  • #15
    Jonathan Tropper
    “Sometimes you walk past a pretty girl on the street there's something beyond beauty in her face, something warm and smart and inviting, and in the three seconds you have to look at her, you actually fall in love, and in those moments, you can actually know the taste of her kiss, the feel of her skin against yours, the sound of her laugh, how she'll look at you and make you whole. And then she's gone, and in the five seconds afterwards, you mourn her loss with more sadness than you'll ever admit to. ”
    Jonathan Tropper, How to Talk to a Widower

  • #16
    Jonathan Tropper
    “You swear you’ll never become your parents. You listen to edgy music, you dress young and hip, you have sex standing up and on kitchen tables, you say “fuck” and “shit” a lot, and then one day, without warning, their words emerge from your mouth like long-dormant sleeper agents suddenly activated. You’re still young enough to hear these words through the ears of the teenager sitting beside you, and you realize how pitiful and ultimately futile your efforts will be, a few measly sandbags against the tidal wave of genetic destiny.”
    Jonathan Tropper, How to Talk to a Widower

  • #17
    Rachel Joyce
    “The world was made up of people putting one foot in front of the other; and a life might appear ordinary simply because the person living it had been doing so for a long time.”
    Rachel Joyce, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

  • #18
    Rachel Joyce
    “Harold could no longer pass a stranger without acknowledging the truth that everyone was the same, and also unique; and that this was the dilemma of being human.”
    Rachel Joyce, The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

  • #19
    Michael Chabon
    “It would please him well enough to amount to no more in the end than a single great organ of detection, reaching into blankness for a clue.”
    Michael Chabon, The Final Solution
    tags: p-83

  • #20
    Jorge Luis Borges
    “Let others pride themselves about how many pages they have written; I'd rather boast about the ones I've read.”
    Jorge Luis Borges

  • #21
    Justin Cronin
    “Does anybody out there care? Are we worth saving? What would God want from me, if there is a God? The greatest faith is the willingness to ask in the first place, all evidence to the contrary. Faith not just in God, but in all of us.”
    Justin Cronin, The Twelve

  • #22
    Justin Cronin
    “That's the worst part, really, when you think about it. Try as you might, nobody will ever truly know who you are. You're just somebody alone in a house with your thoughts and nothing else.”
    Justin Cronin, The Twelve

  • #23
    Susan Abulhawa
    “Toughness found fertile soil in the hearts of Palestinians, and the grains of resistance embedded themselves in their skin. Endurance evolved as a hallmark of refugee society. But the price they paid was the subduing of tender vulnerability. They learned to celebrate martyrdom. Only martyrdom offered freedom. Only in death were they at last invulnerable to Israel. Martyrdom became the ultimate defiance of Israeli occupation.”
    Susan Abulhawa, Mornings in Jenin

  • #24
    Stephen King
    “Books are the perfect entertainment: no commercials, no batteries, hours of enjoyment for each dollar spent. What I wonder is why everybody doesn't carry a book around for those inevitable dead spots in life.”
    Stephen King

  • #25
    John Steinbeck
    “I wonder how many people I've looked at all my life and never seen.”
    John Steinbeck, The Winter of Our Discontent

  • #26
    Mohsin Hamid
    “We are all refugees from our childhoods. And so we turn, among other things, to stories. To write a story, to read a story, is to be a refugee from the state of refugees. Writers and readers seek a solution to the problem that time passes, that those who have gone are gone and those who will go, which is to say every one of us, will go. For there was a moment when anything was possible. And there will be a moment when nothing is possible. But in between we can create.”
    Mohsin Hamid, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

  • #27
    Mohsin Hamid
    “She sees how you diminish her solitude, and, more meaningfully, she sees you seeing, which sparks in her that oddest of desires an I can have for a you, the desire that you be less lonely.”
    Mohsin Hamid, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

  • #28
    Mohsin Hamid
    “But what you do sense, what is unmistakable, is a rising tide of frustration and anger and violence, born partly of the greater familiarity the poor today have with the rich, their faces pressed to that clear window on wealth afforded by ubiquitous television, and partly of the change in mentality that results from an outward shift in the supply curve for firearms.”
    Mohsin Hamid, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

  • #29
    Mohsin Hamid
    “It is the first visit in many years for your son, finally a citizen of his new country and free to travel, and you try to suppress your undercurrent of resentment at his decision to absent himself from your presence in so devastatingly severe a manner. You feel a love you know you will never be able to adequately explain or express to him, a love that flows one way down the generations, not in reverse, and is understood and reciprocated only when time has made of a younger generation an older one.”
    Mohsin Hamid, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia

  • #30
    Michael Ondaatje
    “Don’t we forgive everything of a lover? We forgive selfishness, desire, guile. As long as we are the motive for it.”
    Michael Ondaatje, The English Patient
    tags: love



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