Ann > Ann's Quotes

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  • #1
    “Even
    After
    All this time
    The Sun never says to the Earth,

    "You owe me."

    Look
    What happens
    With a love like that,
    It lights the whole sky.”
    Hafiz

  • #2
    W.H. Auden
    “How should we like it were stars to burn
    With a passion for us we could not return?
    If equal affection cannot be,
    Let the more loving one be me.”
    W.H. Auden

  • #3
    Rainer Maria Rilke
    “Let everything happen to you
    Beauty and terror
    Just keep going
    No feeling is final”
    Rainer Maria Rilke

  • #4
    Dr. Seuss
    “You can get help from teachers, but you are going to have to learn a lot by yourself, sitting alone in a room.”
    Dr. Seuss

  • #5
    John Dewey
    “Failure is instructive. The person who really thinks learns quite as much from his failures as from his successes.”
    John Dewey

  • #6
    John Dewey
    “Scientific principles and laws do not lie on the surface of nature. They are hidden, and must be wrested from nature by an active and elaborate technique of inquiry. ”
    John Dewey, Reconstruction in Philosophy

  • #7
    John Dewey
    “The good man is the man who, no matter how morally unworthy he has been, is moving to become better.”
    John Dewey

  • #8
    Ernest Hemingway
    “The first draft of anything is shit.”
    Ernest Hemingway

  • #9
    Ernest Hemingway
    “I drink to make other people more interesting.”
    Hemingway, Ernest

  • #10
    Daniel Kahneman
    “A general “law of least effort” applies to cognitive as well as physical
    exertion. The law asserts that if there are several ways of achieving the
    same goal, people will eventually gravitate to the least demanding course
    of action. In the economy of action, effort is a cost, and the acquisition of
    skill is driven by the balance of benefits and costs. Laziness is built deep into our nature.”
    Daniel Kahneman, Thinking, Fast and Slow

  • #11
    Sylvia Plath
    “Kiss me, and you will see how important I am.”
    Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath

  • #12
    Friedrich Nietzsche
    “To live is to suffer, to survive is to find some meaning in the suffering.”
    Friedrich Nietzsche

  • #13
    William Faulkner
    “I say money has no value; it's just the way you spend it.”
    William Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury
    tags: money

  • #14
    Oscar Wilde
    “I won't tell you that the world matters nothing, or the world's voice, or the voice of society. They matter a good deal. They matter far too much. But there are moments when one has to choose between living one's own life, fully, entirely, completely—or dragging out some false, shallow, degrading existence that the world in its hypocrisy demands. You have that moment now. Choose!”
    Oscar Wilde

  • #15
    Walker Evans
    “Stare, pry, listen, eavesdrop. Die knowing something. You are not here long.”
    Walker Evans

  • #16
    Selma Lagerlöf
    “Nothing on earth can make up for the loss of one who has loved you.”
    Selma Lagerlöf

  • #17
    Kate Chopin
    “Perhaps it is better to wake up after all, even to suffer, rather than to remain a dupe to illusions all one's life.”
    Kate Chopin, The Awakening, and Selected Stories

  • #18
    David Lipsky
    “David Foster Wallace: I think one of the insidious lessons about TV is the meta-lesson that you’re dumb. This is all you can do. This is easy, and you’re the sort of person who really just wants to sit in a chair and have it easy. When in fact there are parts of us, in a way, that are a lot more ambitious than that. And what we need, I think—and I’m not saying I’m the person to do it. But I think what we need is seriously engaged art, that can teach again that we’re smart. And that there’s stuff that TV and movies—although they’re great at certain things—cannot give us.”
    David Lipsky, Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace

  • #19
    David Lipsky
    “And I think that the ultimate way you and I get lucky is if you have some success early in life, you get to find out early it doesn't mean anything. Which means you get to start early the work of figuring out what does mean something -- David Foster Wallace”
    David Lipsky, Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace

  • #20
    David Lipsky
    “David Foster Wallace: What writers have is a license and also the freedom to sit—to sit, clench their fists, and make themselves be excruciatingly aware of the stuff that we’re mostly aware of only on a certain level. And that if the writer does his job right, what he basically does is remind the reader of how smart the reader is. Is to wake the reader up to stuff that the reader’s been aware of all the time. And it’s not a question of the writer having more capacity than the average person. It’s that the writer is willing I think to cut off, cut himself off from certain stuff, and develop…and just, and think really hard. Which not everybody has the luxury to do.”
    David Lipsky, Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace

  • #21
    Rainer Maria Rilke
    “Be patient toward all that is unsolved in your heart and try to love the questions themselves, like locked rooms and like books that are now written in a very foreign tongue. Do not now seek the answers, which cannot be given you because you would not be able to live them. And the point is, to live everything. Live the questions now. Perhaps you will then gradually, without noticing it, live along some distant day into the answer.”
    Rainer Maria Rilke

  • #22
    Rainer Maria Rilke
    “For one human being to love another human being: that is perhaps the most difficult task that has been given to us, the ultimate, the final problem and proof, the work for which all other work is merely preparation.”
    Rainer Maria Rilke, The Selected Poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke
    tags: love

  • #23
    Rainer Maria Rilke
    “The point of marriage is not to create a quick commonality by tearing down all boundaries; on the contrary, a good marriage is one in which each partner appoints the other to be the guardian of his solitude, and thus they show each other the greatest possible trust. A merging of two people is an impossibility, and where it seems to exist, it is a hemming-in, a mutual consent that robs one party or both parties of their fullest freedom and development. But once the realization is accepted that even between the closest people infinite distances exist, a marvelous living side-by-side can grow up for them, if they succeed in loving the expanse between them, which gives them the possibility of always seeing each other as a whole and before an immense sky.”
    Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet

  • #24
    Rainer Maria Rilke
    “Why do you want to shut out of your life any uneasiness, any misery, any depression, since after all you don't know what work these conditions are doing inside you? Why do you want to persecute yourself with the question of where all this is coming from and where it is going? Since you know, after all, that you are in the midst of transitions and you wished for nothing so much as to change. If there is anything unhealthy in your reactions, just bear in mind that sickness is the means by which an organism frees itself from what is alien; so one must simply help it to be sick, to have its whole sickness and to break out with it, since that is the way it gets better.”
    Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet

  • #25
    “This place where you are right now,
    God circled on a map for you.”
    Hafiz

  • #26
    Rumi
    “Don’t grieve. Anything you lose comes round in another form.”
    Rumi

  • #27
    Toni Morrison
    “If there's a book that you want to read, but it hasn't been written yet, then you must write it.”
    Toni Morrison

  • #28
    David Foster Wallace
    “The so-called ‘psychotically depressed’ person who tries to kill herself doesn’t do so out of quote ‘hopelessness’ or any abstract conviction that life’s assets and debits do not square. And surely not because death seems suddenly appealing. The person in whom Its invisible agony reaches a certain unendurable level will kill herself the same way a trapped person will eventually jump from the window of a burning high-rise. Make no mistake about people who leap from burning windows. Their terror of falling from a great height is still just as great as it would be for you or me standing speculatively at the same window just checking out the view; i.e. the fear of falling remains a constant. The variable here is the other terror, the fire’s flames: when the flames get close enough, falling to death becomes the slightly less terrible of two terrors. It’s not desiring the fall; it’s terror of the flames. And yet nobody down on the sidewalk, looking up and yelling ‘Don’t!’ and ‘Hang on!’, can understand the jump. Not really. You’d have to have personally been trapped and felt flames to really understand a terror way beyond falling.”
    David Foster Wallace

  • #29
    David Foster Wallace
    “Fiction is one of the few experiences where loneliness can be both confronted and relieved. Drugs, movies where stuff blows up, loud parties -- all these chase away loneliness by making me forget my name's Dave and I live in a one-by-one box of bone no other party can penetrate or know. Fiction, poetry, music, really deep serious sex, and, in various ways, religion -- these are the places (for me) where loneliness is countenanced, stared down, transfigured, treated.”
    David Foster Wallace

  • #30
    William Shakespeare
    “Though she be but little, she is fierce!”
    William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream



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