Amir > Amir's Quotes

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  • #1
    Christopher Hitchens
    “The Bible may, indeed does, contain a warrant for trafficking in humans, for ethnic cleansing, for slavery, for bride-price, and for indiscriminate massacre, but we are not bound by any of it because it was put together by crude, uncultured human mammals.”
    Christopher Hitchens, god is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything

  • #1
    William Shakespeare
    “If we shadows have offended,
    Think but this, and all is mended,
    That you have but slumbered here
    While these visions did appear.
    And this weak and idle theme,
    No more yielding but a dream,
    Gentles, do not reprehend:
    If you pardon, we will mend:
    And, as I am an honest Puck,
    If we have unearned luck
    Now to 'scape the serpent's tongue,
    We will make amends ere long;
    Else the Puck a liar call;
    So, good night unto you all.
    Give me your hands, if we be friends,
    And Robin shall restore amends.”
    William Shakespeare, A Midsummer Night's Dream

  • #1
    Douglas Adams
    “Ford!" he said, "there's an infinite number of monkeys outside who want to talk to us about this script for Hamlet they've worked out.”
    Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  • #1
    William Shakespeare
    “Out, out, brief candle! Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and is heard no more. It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.”
    William Shakespeare, Macbeth

  • #1
    W.B. Yeats
    “I sat, a solitary man,
    In a crowded London shop,
    An open book and empty cup
    On the marble table-top.
    While on the shop and street I gazed
    My body of a sudden blazed;
    And twenty minutes more or less
    It seemed, so great my happiness,
    That I was blessed and could bless.”
    W.B. Yeats, The Winding Stair and Other Poems

  • #2
    William Shakespeare
    “Better three hours too soon than a minute too late.”
    William Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor
    tags: time

  • #2
    Bertrand Russell
    “Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #2
    Abraham H. Maslow
    “I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail.”
    Abraham H. Maslow, Toward a Psychology of Being

  • #3
    Bertrand Russell
    “In all affairs it's a healthy thing now and then to hang a question mark on the things you have long taken for granted.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #3
    Martin Luther King Jr.
    “True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring. ”
    Martin Luther King Jr.

  • #3
    William Shakespeare
    “There's small choice in rotten apples.”
    William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew

  • #4
    Bertrand Russell
    “And if there were a God, I think it very unlikely that He would have such an uneasy vanity as to be offended by those who doubt His existence”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #4
    Hunter S. Thompson
    “So we shall let the reader answer this question for himself: who is the happier man, he who has braved the storm of life and lived or he who has stayed securely on shore and merely existed?”
    Hunter S. Thompson

  • #4
    William Shakespeare
    “The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.”
    William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice

  • #5
    Bertrand Russell
    “That is the idea -- that we should all be wicked if we did not hold to the Christian religion. It seems to me that the people who have held to it have been for the most part extremely wicked. You find this curious fact, that the more intense has been the religion of any period and the more profound has been the dogmatic belief, the greater has been the cruelty and the worse has been the state of affairs. In the so-called ages of faith, when men really did believe the Christian religion in all its completeness, there was the Inquisition, with all its tortures; there were millions of unfortunate women burned as witches; and there was every kind of cruelty practiced upon all sorts of people in the name of religion.

    You find as you look around the world that every single bit of progress in humane feeling, every improvement in the criminal law, every step toward the diminution of war, every step toward better treatment of the colored races, or every mitigation of slavery, every moral progress that there has been in the world, has been consistently opposed by the organized churches of the world. I say quite deliberately that the Christian religion, as organized in its churches, has been and still is the principal enemy of moral progress in the world.

    You may think that I am going too far when I say that that is still so. I do not think that I am. Take one fact. You will bear with me if I mention it. It is not a pleasant fact, but the churches compel one to mention facts that are not pleasant. Supposing that in this world that we live in today an inexperienced girl is married to a syphilitic man; in that case the Catholic Church says, 'This is an indissoluble sacrament. You must endure celibacy or stay together. And if you stay together, you must not use birth control to prevent the birth of syphilitic children.' Nobody whose natural sympathies have not been warped by dogma, or whose moral nature was not absolutely dead to all sense of suffering, could maintain that it is right and proper that that state of things should continue.

    That is only an example. There are a great many ways in which, at the present moment, the church, by its insistence upon what it chooses to call morality, inflicts upon all sorts of people undeserved and unnecessary suffering. And of course, as we know, it is in its major part an opponent still of progress and improvement in all the ways that diminish suffering in the world, because it has chosen to label as morality a certain narrow set of rules of conduct which have nothing to do with human happiness; and when you say that this or that ought to be done because it would make for human happiness, they think that has nothing to do with the matter at all. 'What has human happiness to do with morals? The object of morals is not to make people happy.”
    Bertrand Russell, Why I Am Not a Christian and Other Essays on Religion and Related Subjects

  • #5
    Bertrand Russell
    “I would never die for my beliefs because I might be wrong.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #5
    Patrick Rothfuss
    “It's the questions we can't answer that teach us the most. They teach us how to think. If you give a man an answer, all he gains is a little fact. But give him a question and he'll look for his own answers.”
    Patrick Rothfuss, The Wise Man's Fear

  • #5
    Sinclair Lewis
    “You," Said Dr. Yavitch, "are a middle-road liberal, and you haven't the slightest idea what you want. I, being a revolutionist, know exactly what I want -- and what I want now is a drink.”
    Sinclair Lewis, Babbitt

  • #5
    William Shakespeare
    “When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.”
    William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

  • #6
    Bertrand Russell
    “One should as a rule respect public opinion in so far as is necessary to avoid starvation and to keep out of prison, but anything that goes beyond this is voluntary submission to an unnecessary tyranny, and is likely to interfere with happiness in all kinds of ways.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #6
    W.B. Yeats
    “The Irishman sustains himself during brief periods of joy by the knowledge that tragedy is just around the corner.”
    W.B. Yeats

  • #6
    William Shakespeare
    “If we shadows have offended,
    Think but this, and all is mended,
    That you have but slumber'd here
    While these visions did appear.”
    William Shakespeare

  • #7
    Bertrand Russell
    “Even if the open windows of science at first make us shiver after the cozy indoor warmth of traditional humanizing myths, in the end the fresh air brings vigor, and the great spaces have a splendor of their own.”
    Bertrand Russell, What I Believe

  • #7
    William Shakespeare
    “Of all the wonders that I have heard,
    It seems to me most strange that men should fear;
    Seeing death, a necessary end,
    Will come when it will come.
    (Act II, Scene 2)”
    William Shakespeare, Julius Caesar

  • #7
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    “When friendships are real, they are not glass threads or frost work, but the solidest things we can know.”
    Ralph Waldo Emerson, Essays: First Series

  • #8
    Bertrand Russell
    “One of the symptoms of an approaching nervous breakdown is the belief that one’s work is terribly important.”
    Bertrand Russell, The Conquest of Happiness

  • #8
    Mark Twain
    “Well, there are times when one would like to hang the whole human race and finish the farce.”
    Mark Twain

  • #8
    William Shakespeare
    “I can see he's not in your good books,' said the messenger.
    'No, and if he were I would burn my library.”
    William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing

  • #9
    Bertrand Russell
    “It has been said that man is a rational animal. All my life I have been searching for evidence which could support this.”
    Bertrand Russell

  • #9
    Douglas Adams
    “The fact that we live at the bottom of a deep gravity well, on the surface of a gas covered planet going around a nuclear fireball 90 million miles away and think this to be normal is obviously some indication of how skewed our perspective tends to be.”
    Douglas Adams, The Salmon of Doubt: Hitchhiking the Galaxy One Last Time



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