Jenny > Jenny's Quotes

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  • #1
    Laura Hillenbrand
    “When he thought of his history, what resonated with him now was not all that he had suffered but the divine love that he believed had intervened to save him.”
    Laura Hillenbrand, Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption

  • #2
    Dorothy L. Sayers
    “So I think I'd better go, said Wimsey. "I rather wish I hadn't come buttin' into this. some things may be better left alone, don't you think? My sympathies are all in the wrong place and I don't like it. I Know all about not doing evil tha good may come. I'ts doin' good that evil may come that is so embarrassin'."
    "My dear boy," said the Rector, "it does not do for us to take too much thought for the morrow. It is better to follow the truth and leave the results in the hand of God. He can forsee where we cannot, because He knows all the facts.”
    Dorothy L. Sayers

  • #3
    T.S. Eliot
    “The dove descending breaks the air
    With flame of incandescent terror
    Of which the tongues declare
    The one discharge from sin and error.
    The only hope, or else despair
    Lies in the choice of pyre or pyre-
    To be redeemed from fire by fire.

    Who then devised the torment? Love.
    Love is the unfamiliar Name
    Behind the hands that wove
    The intolerable shirt of flame
    Which human power cannot remove.
    We only live, only suspire
    Consumed by either fire or fire.”
    T.S. Eliot, Four Quartets

  • #4
    John Chrysostom
    “The potency of prayer hath subdued the strength of fire; it hath bridled the rage of lions, hushed anarchy to rest, extinguished wars, appeased the elements, expelled demons, burst the chains of death, expanded the gates of heaven, assuaged diseases, repelled frauds, rescued cities from destruction, stayed the sun in its course, and arrested the progress of the thunderbolt.”
    John Chrysostom

  • #5
    Marilynne Robinson
    “Cain killed Abel, and the blood cried out from the ground--a story so sad that even God took notice of it. Maybe it was not the sadness of the story, since worse things have happened every minute since that day, but its novelty that He found striking. In the newness of the world God was a young man, and grew indignant over the slightest things. In the newness of the world God had perhaps not Himself realized the ramifications of certain of his laws, for example, that shock will spend itself in waves; that our images will mimic every gesture, and that shattered they will multiply and mimic every gesture ten, a hundred, or a thousand times. Cain, the image of God, gave the simple earth of the field a voice and a sorrow, and God himself heard the voice, and grieved for the sorrow, so Cain was a creator, in the image of his creator.”
    Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping

  • #6
    Marilynne Robinson
    “It was a source of both terror and comfort to me then that I often seemed invisible — incompletely and minimally existent, in fact. It seemed to me that I made no impact on the world, and that in exchange I was privileged to watch it unawares.”
    Marilynne Robinson, Housekeeping

  • #7
    Marilynne Robinson
    “Memory can make a thing seem to have been much more than it was.”
    Marilynne Robinson, Gilead

  • #8
    Shūsaku Endō
    “Christ did not die for the good and beautiful. It is easy enough to die for the good and beautiful; the hard thing is to die for the miserable and corrupt.”
    Shūsaku Endō, Silence

  • #9
    “A man's needs are few. The simpler the life, therefore, the better. Indeed, only three things are truly necessary in order to make life happy: the blessing of God, the benefit of books, and the benevolence of friends.”
    Thomas Chalmers

  • #10
    C.S. Lewis
    “When the time comes to you at which you will be forced at last to utter the speech which has lain at the center of your soul for years, which you have, all that time, idiot-like, been saying over and over, you'll not talk about the joy of words. I saw well why the gods do not speak to us openly, nor let us answer. Till that word can be dug out of us, why should they hear the babble that we think we mean? How can they meet us face to face till we have faces?”
    C.S. Lewis, Till We Have Faces

  • #11
    T.H. White
    “Mordred and Agravaine thought Arthur hypocritical—as all decent men must be, if you assume that decency can’t exist.”
    T.H. White, The Once and Future King

  • #12
    T.H. White
    “Only fools want to be great.”
    T.H. White, The Once and Future King

  • #13
    Eudora Welty
    “Even as we grew up, my mother could not help imposing herself between her children and whatever it was they might take it in mind to reach out for in the world. For she would get it for them, if it was good enough for them--she would have to be very sure--and give it to them, at whatever cost to herself: valiance was in her very fibre. She stood always prepared in herself to challenge the world in our place. She did indeed tend to make the world look dangerous, and so it had been to her. A way had to be found around her love sometimes, without challenging that, and at the same time cherishing it in its unassailable strength. Each of us children did, sooner or later, in part at least, solve this in a different, respectful, complicated way.”
    Eudora Welty, One Writer's Beginnings

  • #14
    Eudora Welty
    “I learned from the age of two or three that any room in our house, at any time of day, was there to read in, or be read to.”
    Eudora Welty, One Writer's Beginnings

  • #15
    Evelyn Waugh
    “These memories, which are my life--for we possess nothing certainly except the past--were always with me.”
    Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited

  • #16
    Evelyn Waugh
    “My theme is memory, that winged host that soared about me one grey morning of war-time. These memories, which are my life—for we possess nothing certainly except the past—were always with me. Like the pigeons of St. Mark’s, they were everywhere, under my feet, singly, in pairs, in little honey-voiced congregations, nodding, strutting, winking, rolling the tender feathers of their necks, perching sometimes, if I stood still, on my shoulder or pecking a broken biscuit from between my lips; until, suddenly, the noon gun boomed and in a moment, with a flutter and sweep of wings, the pavement was bare and the whole sky above dark with a tumult of fowl. Thus it was that morning.”
    Evelyn Waugh, Brideshead Revisited

  • #17
    “Young lovers seek perfection. Old lovers learn the art of sewing shreds together. And of seeing beauty in a multiplicity of patches. - How to make an American Quilt”
    Anonymous

  • #18
    Kenneth Grahame
    “Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing - absolutely nothing - half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.”
    Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows

  • #19
    Teresa of Ávila
    “Let nothing disturb you, nothing frighten you, all things are passing, God is unchanging. Patience gains all; nothing is lacking to those who have God: God alone is sufficient.”
    St. Teresa of Avila

  • #20
    J.D. Vance
    “I don't know what the answer is, precisely, but I know it starts when we stop blaming Obama or Bush or faceless companies and ask ourselves what we can do to make things better.”
    J.D. Vance, Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis

  • #21
    Theodore Roosevelt
    “If you could kick the person in the pants responsible for most of your trouble, you wouldn't sit for a month.”
    Theodore Roosevelt

  • #22
    Annie Dillard
    “Father had stretched out his long legs and was tilting back in his chair. Mother sat with her knees crossed, in blue slacks, smoking a Chesterfield. The dessert dishes were still on the table. My sisters were nowhere in evidence. It was a warm evening; the big dining-room windows gave onto blooming rhododendrons.

    Mother regarded me warmly. She gave me to understand that she was glad I had found what I had been looking for, but that she and father were happy to sit with their coffee, and would not be coming down.

    She did not say, but I understood at once, that they had their pursuits (coffee?) and I had mine. She did not say, but I began to understand then, that you do what you do out of your private passion for the thing itself.

    I had essentially been handed my own life. In subsequent years my parents would praise my drawings and poems, and supply me with books, art supplies, and sports equipment, and listen to my troubles and enthusiasms, and supervise my hours, and discuss and inform, but they would not get involved with my detective work, nor hear about my reading, nor inquire about my homework or term papers or exams, nor visit the salamanders I caught, nor listen to me play the piano, nor attend my field hockey games, nor fuss over my insect collection with me, or my poetry collection or stamp collection or rock collection. My days and nights were my own to plan and fill.”
    Annie Dillard, An American Childhood

  • #23
    Margaret Widdemer
    “Pain has been and grief enough and bitterness and crying,
    Sharp ways and stony ways I think it was she trod;
    But all there is to see now is a white bird flying,
    Whose blood-stained wings go circling high—circling up to God!”
    Margaret Widdemer



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