Chloé > Chloé's Quotes

Showing 1-30 of 928
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 30 31
sort by

  • #1
    Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    “Pain and suffering are always inevitable for a large intelligence and a deep heart. The really great men must, I think, have great sadness on earth.”
    Fyodor Dostoevsky, Crime and Punishment

  • #2
    Samuel Beckett
    “All of old. Nothing else ever. Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try again. Fail again. Fail better.”
    Samuel Beckett, Worstward Ho

  • #3
    Simone de Beauvoir
    “I am too intelligent, too demanding, and too resourceful for anyone to be able to take charge of me entirely. No one knows me or loves me completely. I have only myself”
    Simone de Beauvoir

  • #4
    Virginia Woolf
    “I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #5
    Virginia Woolf
    “Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.”
    Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own

  • #6
    Michael Cunningham
    “You cannot find peace by avoiding life.”
    Michael Cunningham, The Hours

  • #7
    Franz Kafka
    “Many a book is like a key to unknown chambers within the castle of one’s own self.”
    Franz Kafka

  • #8
    Franz Kafka
    “A book must be the axe for the frozen sea within us.”
    Franz Kafka

  • #9
    James Joyce
    “Shut your eyes and see.”
    James Joyce

  • #10
    Ernest Hemingway
    “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.”
    Ernest Hemingway

  • #11
    Ernest Hemingway
    “Happiness in intelligent people is the rarest thing I know.”
    Ernest Hemingway, The Garden of Eden

  • #12
    Arthur  Miller
    “Don't be seduced into thinking that that which does not make a profit is without value.”
    Arthur Miller

  • #13
    Shirley Jackson
    “No live organism can continue for long to exist sanely under conditions of absolute reality.”
    Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House

  • #14
    Daphne du Maurier
    “But luxury has never appealed to me, I like simple things, books, being alone, or with somebody who understands.”
    Daphne du Maurier

  • #15
    Angela Y. Davis
    “The idea of freedom is inspiring. But what does it mean? If you are free in a political sense but have no food, what's that? The freedom to starve?”
    Angela Y. Davis

  • #16
    Angela Y. Davis
    “[Prison] relieves us of the responsibility of seriously engaging with the problems of our society, especially those produced by racism and, increasingly, global capitalism.”
    Angela Y. Davis, Are Prisons Obsolete?

  • #17
    Anne Frank
    “How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.”
    Anne Frank, Anne Frank's Tales from the Secret Annex: A Collection of Her Short Stories, Fables, and Lesser-Known Writings, Revised Edition

  • #18
    Nikolai Gogol
    “The longer and more carefully we look at a funny story, the sadder it becomes.”
    Nikolai V. Gogol

  • #19
    Knut Hamsun
    “I love three things," I then say. "I love a dream of love I once had, I love you, and I love this patch of earth."

    "And which do you love best?"

    "The dream.”
    Knut Hamsun, Pan

  • #20
    Knut Hamsun
    “I suffered no pain, my hunger had taken the edge off; instead I felt pleasantly empty, untouched by everything around me and happy to be unseen by all. I put my legs up on the bench and leaned back, the best way to feel the true well-being of seclusion. There wasn't a cloud in my mind, nor did I feel any discomfort, and I hadn't a single unfulfilled desire or craving as far as my thought could reach. I lay with open eyes in a state of utter absence from myself and felt deliciously out of it.”
    Knut Hamsun, Hunger

  • #21
    Knut Hamsun
    “An increasing number of people who lead mental lives of great intensity, people who are sensitive by nature, notice the steadily more frequent appearance in them of mental states of great strangeness ... a wordless and irrational feeling of ecstasy; or a breath of psychic pain; a sense of being spoken to from afar, from the sky or the sea; an agonizingly developed sense of hearing which can cause one to wince at the murmuring of unseen atoms; an irrational staring into the heart of some closed kingdom suddenly and briefly revealed.”
    Knut Hamsun

  • #22
    Knut Hamsun
    “And the great spirit of darkness spread a shroud over me...everything was silent-everything. But upon the heights soughed the everlasting song, the voice of the air, the distant, toneless humming which is never silent.”
    Knut Hamsun, Hunger

  • #23
    Knut Hamsun
    “The poet must always, in every instance, have the vibrant word... that by it's trenchancy can so wound my soul that it whimpers.... One must know and recognize not merely the direct but the secret power of the word; one must be able to give one's writing unexpected effects. It must have a hectic, anguished vehemence, so that it rushes past like a gust of air, and it must have a latent, roistering tenderness so that it creeps and steals one's mind; it must be able to ring out like a sea-shanty in a tremendous hour, in the time of the tempest, and it must be able to sigh like one who, in tearful mood, sobs in his inmost heart.”
    Knut Hamsun

  • #24
    Béla Tarr
    “Most of the movies are working like, 'Information, cut, information, cut, information, cut' and for them the information is just the story. For me, a lot of things [are] information - I try to involve, to the movie, the time, the space, and a lot of other things - which is a part of our life but not connecting directly to the story-telling. And I'm working on the same way - 'information, cut, information, cut,' but for me the information is not only the story.”
    Béla Tarr

  • #25
    Béla Tarr
    “You are the sun. The sun doesn't move, this is what it does. You are the Earth. The Earth is here for a start, and then the Earth moves around the sun. And now, we'll have an explanation that simple folks like us can also understand, about immortality. All I ask is that you step with me into the boundlessness, where constancy, quietude and peace, infinite emptiness reign. And just imagine, in this infinite sonorous silence, everywhere is an impenetrable darkness. Here, we only experience general motion, and at first, we don't notice the events that we are witnessing. The brilliant light of the sun always sheds its heat and light on that side of the Earth which is just then turned towards it. And we stand here in its brilliance. This is the moon. The moon revolves around the Earth. What is happening? We suddenly see that the disc of the moon, the disc of the moon, on the Sun's flaming sphere, makes an indentation, and this indentation, the dark shadow, grows bigger... and bigger. And as it covers more and more, slowly only a narrow crescent of the sun remains, a dazzling crescent. And at the next moment, the next moment - say that it's around one in the afternoon - a most dramatic turn of event occurs. At that moment the air suddenly turns cold. Can you feel it? The sky darkens, then goes all dark. The dogs howl, rabbits hunch down, the deer run in panic, run, stampede in fright. And in this awful, incomprehensible dusk, even the birds... the birds too are confused and go to roost. And then... Complete Silence. Everything that lives is still. Are the hills going to march off? Will heaven fall upon us? Will the Earth open under us? We don't know. We don't know, for a total eclipse has come upon us... But... but no need to fear. It's not over. For across the sun's glowing sphere, slowly, the Moon swims away. And the sun once again bursts forth, and to the Earth slowly there comes again light, and warmth again floods the Earth. Deep emotion pierces everyone. They have escaped the weight of darkness”
    Béla Tarr

  • #26
    László Krasznahorkai
    “Quietly, continually, the rain fell and the inconsolable wind that died then was forever resurrected ruffled the still surfaces of puddles so lightly it failed to disturb the delicate dead skin that had covered them during the night so that instead of recovering the previous day's tired glitter they increasingly and remorselessly absorbed the light that swam slowly out of the east.”
    László Krasznahorkai, Satantango

  • #27
    Fernando Pessoa
    “The feelings that hurt most, the emotions that sting most, are those that are absurd - The longing for impossible things, precisely because they are impossible; nostalgia for what never was; the desire for what could have been; regret over not being someone else; dissatisfaction with the world’s existence. All these half-tones of the soul’s consciousness create in us a painful landscape, an eternal sunset of what we are.”
    Fernando Pessoa

  • #28
    Philip K. Dick
    “It is sometimes an appropriate response to reality to go insane.”
    Philip K. Dick, VALIS

  • #29
    Robert Bresson
    “Make visible what, without you, might perhaps never have been seen.”
    Robert Bresson

  • #30
    Robert Bresson
    “Bring together things that have not yet been brought together and did not seem predisposed to be so.”
    Robert Bresson, Notes on the Cinematographer
    tags: art



Rss
« previous 1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 30 31