Hampus > Hampus's Quotes

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  • #1
    Virginia Woolf
    “Nothing thicker than a knife's blade separates happiness from melancholy.”
    Virginia Woolf, Orlando

  • #2
    Virginia Woolf
    “I'm sick to death of this particular self. I want another.”
    Virginia Woolf, Orlando

  • #3
    Virginia Woolf
    “By the truth we are undone. Life is a dream. 'Tis the waking that kills us. He who robs us of our dreams robs us of our life.”
    Virginia Woolf, Orlando

  • #4
    Virginia Woolf
    “Memory is the seamstress, and a capricious one at that. Memory runs her needle in and out, up and down, hither and thither. We know not what comes next, or what follows after. Thus, the most ordinary movement in the world, such as sitting down at a table and pulling the inkstand towards one, may agitate a thousand odd, disconnected fragments, now bright, now dim, hanging and bobbing and dipping and flaunting, like the underlinen of a family of fourteen on a line in a gale of wind.”
    Virginia Woolf, Orlando

  • #5
    Anthony Doerr
    “Open your eyes and see what you can with them before they close forever.”
    Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See

  • #6
    Anthony Doerr
    “So how, children, does the brain, which lives without a spark of light, build for us a world full of light?”
    Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See

  • #7
    Anthony Doerr
    “It's embarrassingly plain how inadequate language is.”
    Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See

  • #8
    “Children don’t know the meaning of yesterday, of the day before yesterday, or even of tomorrow, everything is this, now: the street is this, the doorway is this, the stairs are this, this is Mamma, this is Papa, this is the day, this the night.”
    Elena Ferrante, My Brilliant Friend

  • #9
    “She took the facts and in a natural way charged them with tension; she intensified reality as she reduced it to words, she injected it with energy.”
    Elena Ferrante, My Brilliant Friend

  • #10
    William Shakespeare
    “These violent delights have violent ends
    And in their triump die, like fire and powder
    Which, as they kiss, consume”
    William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

  • #11
    Umberto Eco
    “Books are not made to be believed, but to be subjected to inquiry. When we consider a book, we mustn't ask ourselves what it says but what it means...”
    Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

  • #12
    Umberto Eco
    “Until then I had thought each book spoke of the things, human or divine, that lie outside books. Now I realized that not infrequently books speak of books: it is as if they spoke among themselves. In the light of this reflection, the library seemed all the more disturbing to me. It was then the place of a long, centuries-old murmuring, an imperceptible dialogue between one parchment and another, a living thing, a receptacle of powers not to be ruled by a human mind, a treasure of secrets emanated by many minds, surviving the death of those who had produced them or had been their conveyors.”
    Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

  • #13
    Umberto Eco
    “A narrator should not supply interpretations of his work; otherwise he would have not written a novel, which is a machine for generating interpretations.”
    Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

  • #14
    Umberto Eco
    “Yesterday's rose endures in its name, we hold empty names.”
    Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

  • #15
    Umberto Eco
    “I dared, for the first and last time in my life, to express a theological conclusion: "But how can a necessary being exist totally polluted with the possible? What difference is there, then, between God and primogenial chaos? Isn't affirming God's absolute omnipotence and His absolute freedom with regard to His own choices tantamount to demonstrating that God does not exist?”
    Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

  • #16
    Umberto Eco
    “Then we are living in a place abandoned by God," I said, disheartened.

    "Have you found any places where God would have felt at home?" William asked me, looking down from his great height.”
    Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

  • #17
    Umberto Eco
    “The beauty of the universe consists not only of unity in variety, but also of variety in unity.”
    Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

  • #18
    Umberto Eco
    “On sober reflection, I find few reasons for publishing my Italian version of an obscure, neo-Gothic French version of a seventeenth century Latin edition of a work written in Latin by a German Monk toward the end of the fourteenth century...First of all, what style should I employ?”
    Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

  • #19
    Umberto Eco
    “Fear prophets, Adso, and those prepared to die for the truth, for as a rule they make many others die with them, often before them, at times instead of them.”
    Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose

  • #20
    Italo Calvino
    “His trees were now hung all over with scrawled pieces of paper and bits of cardboard with maxims from Seneca and Shaftesbury, and with various objects; clusters of feathers, church candles, crowns of leaves, women's corsets, pistols, scales, tied to each other in certain order. The Ombrosians used to spend hours trying to guess what those symbols meant: nobles, Pope, virtue, war? I think some of them had no meaning at all but just served to jog his memory and make him realize that even the most uncommon ideas could be right.”
    Italo Calvino, The Baron in the Trees

  • #21
    Italo Calvino
    “That mesh of leaves and twigs of fork and froth, minute and endless, with the sky glimpsed only in sudden specks and splinters, perhaps it was only there so that my brother could pass through it with his tomtit’s thread, was embroidered on nothing, like this thread of ink which I have let run on for page after page, swarming with cancellations, corrections, doodles, blots and gaps, bursting at times into clear big berries, coagulating at others into piles of tiny starry seeds, then twisting away, forking off, surrounding buds of phrases with frameworks of leaves and clouds, then interweaving again, and so running on and on and on until it splutters and bursts into a last senseless cluster of words, ideas, dreams, and so ends.”
    Italo Calvino, The Baron in the Trees

  • #22
    Italo Calvino
    “Now that he is no longer here I should be interested in so many things: philosophy, politics, history. I follow the news, read books, but they befuddle me. What he meant to say is not there, for he understood something else, something that was all-embracing, and he could not say it in words but only by living as he did.”
    Italo Calvino, The Baron in the Trees

  • #23
    Italo Calvino
    “We live in a country where causes are always seen but never effects.”
    Italo Calvino, The Baron in the Trees

  • #24
    Ernest Hemingway
    “He always thought of the sea as 'la mar' which is what people call her in Spanish when they love her. Sometimes those who love her say bad things of her but they are always said as though she were a woman. Some of the younger fishermen, those who used buoys as floats for their lines and had motorboats, bought when the shark livers had brought much money, spoke of her as 'el mar' which is masculine.They spoke of her as a contestant or a place or even an enemy. But the old man always thought of her as feminine and as something that gave or withheld great favours, and if she did wild or wicked things it was because she could not help them. The moon affects her as it does a woman, he thought.”
    Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

  • #25
    Ernest Hemingway
    “If the others heard me talking out loud they would think that I am crazy. But since I am not, I do not care.”
    Ernest Hemingway, The Old Man and the Sea

  • #26
    Tristan Tzara
    “You'll never know why you exist, but you'll always allow yourselves to be easily persuaded to take life seriously.”
    Tristan Tzara

  • #27
    Tristan Tzara
    “There is a literature that does not reach the voracious mass. It is the work of creators, issued from a real necessity in the author, produced for himself. It expresses the knowledge of a supreme egoism, in which laws wither away. Every page must explode, either by profound heavy seriousness, the whirlwind, poetic frenzy, the new, the eternal, the crushing joke, enthusiasm for principles, or by the way in which it is printed. On the one hand a tottering world in flight, betrothed to the glockenspiel of hell, on the other hand: new men. Rough, bouncing, riding on hiccups. Behind them a crippled world and literary quacks with a mania for improvement.”
    Tristan Tzara

  • #28
    Tristan Tzara
    “I am writing a manifesto and there's nothing I want, and yet I'm saying certain things, and in principle I am against manifestos, as I am against principles.”
    Tristan Tzara

  • #29
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “And so it goes...”
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

  • #30
    Kurt Vonnegut
    “- Why me?
    - That is a very Earthling question to ask, Mr. Pilgrim. Why you? Why us for that matter? Why anything? Because this moment simply is. Have you ever seen bugs trapped in amber?
    - Yes.
    - Well, here we are, Mr. Pilgrim, trapped in the amber of this moment. There is no why.”
    Kurt Vonnegut Jr., Slaughterhouse-Five



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