Katie > Katie's Quotes

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  • #1
    T.S. Eliot
    “Humankind cannot bear very much reality.”
    T.S. Eliot, Four Quartets

  • #2
    Tom Stoppard
    “Words, words. They're all we have to go on.”
    Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead

  • #3
    John Green
    “What a treacherous thing to believe that a person is more than a person.”
    John Green, Paper Towns

  • #4
    John Connolly
    “These stories were very old, as old as people, and they had survived because they were very powerful indeed. They were the tales that echoed in the head long after the books that contained them were cast aside. They were both an escape from reality and an alternative reality themselves. They were so old, and so strange, that they had found a kind of existence independent of the pages they occupied. The world of the old tales existed parallel to ours, but sometimes the walls separating the two became so thing and brittle that the two worlds started to blend into each other. That was when the trouble started. That was when the bad things came. That was when the Crooked Man began to appear to David.”
    John Connolly, The Book of Lost Things

  • #5
    Tom Stoppard
    “We cross our bridges when we come to them and burn them behind us, with nothing to show for our progress except a memory of the smell of smoke, and a presumption that once our eyes watered.”
    Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

  • #6
    Donald Miller
    “And so my prayer is that your story will have involved some leaving and some coming home, some summer and some winter, some roses blooming out like children in a play. My hope is your story will be about changing, about getting something beautiful born inside of you about learning to love a woman or a man, about learning to love a child, about moving yourself around water, around mountains, around friends, about learning to love others more than we love ourselves, about learning oneness as a way of understanding God. We get one story, you and I, and one story alone. God has established the elements, the setting and the climax and the resolution. It would be a crime not to venture out, wouldn't it?

    It might be time for you to go. It might be time to change, to shine out.

    I want to repeat one word for you:
    Leave.

    Roll the word around on your tongue for a bit. It is a beautiful word, isn't it? So strong and forceful, the way you have always wanted to be. And you will not be alone. You have never been alone. Don't worry. Everything will still be here when you get back. It is you who will have changed.”
    Donald Miller, Through Painted Deserts: Light, God, and Beauty on the Open Road

  • #7
    T.S. Eliot
    “We shall not cease from exploration
    And the end of all our exploring
    Will be to arrive where we started
    And know the place for the first time.”
    T.S. Eliot, Four Quartets

  • #8
    Jonathan Safran Foer
    “I like to see people reunited, I like to see people run to each other, I like the kissing and the crying, I like the impatience, the stories that the mouth can't tell fast enough, the ears that aren't big enough, the eyes that can't take in all of the change, I like the hugging, the bringing together, the end of missing someone.”
    Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

  • #9
    Paul Theroux
    “The wish to disappear sends many travelers away. If you are thoroughly sick of being kept waiting at home or at work, travel is perfect: let other people wait for a change. Travel is a sort of revenge for having been put on hold, or having to leave messages on answering machines, not knowing your party's extension, being kept waiting all your working life - the homebound writer's irritants. But also being kept waiting is the human conditon.”
    Paul Theroux, Dark Star Safari: Overland from Cairo to Cape Town

  • #10
    “You have to find a way to laugh a little bit each day despite everything, or your heart will simply run out of the joy that makes it go.”
    Daoud Hari, The Translator: A Tribesman's Memoir of Darfur

  • #11
    “You have to be stronger than your fears if you want to get anything done in this life.”
    Daoud Hari

  • #12
    “The best way to bury your pain is to help others, and to lose yourself in that.”
    Daoud Hari

  • #13
    Tom Stoppard
    “There must have been a moment, at the beginning, were we could have said -- no. But somehow we missed it. ”
    Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead

  • #14
    Tom Stoppard
    “Wheels have been set in motion, and they have their own pace, to which we are...condemned. Each move is dictated by the previous one - that is the meaning of order. If we start being arbitrary it'll just be a shambles: at least, let us hope so. Because if we happened, just happened to discover, or even suspect, that our spontaneity was part of their order, we'd know that we were lost. A Chinaman of the T'ang Dynasty - and, by which definition, a philosopher - dreamed he was a butterfly, and from that moment he was never quite sure that he was not a butterfly dreaming it was a Chinese philosopher. Envy him; his two-fold security. ”
    Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead

  • #15
    Tom Stoppard
    “...Everything has to be taken on trust; truth is only that what is taken to be true. It's the currency if living. There may be nothing behind it, but it doesn't make any difference so long as it is honoured. One acts on assumptions. What do you assume?”
    Tom Stoppard, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead

  • #16
    T.S. Eliot
    “Love is most nearly itself
    When here and now cease to matter.”
    T.S. Eliot, Four Quartets

  • #17
    T.S. Eliot
    “For I have known them all already, known them all -
    Have known the evenings, mornings, afternoons,
    I have measured out my life with coffee spoons;
    I know the voices dying with a dying fall
    Beneath the music from a farther room.
    So how should I presume?

    And I have known the eyes already, known them all -
    The eyes that fix you in a formulated phrase,
    And when I am formulated, sprawling on a pin,
    When I am pinned and wriggling on the wall,
    Then how should I begin
    To spit out all the butt-ends of my days and ways?
    And how should I presume?”
    T.S. Eliot, T.S. Eliot Reads: The Wasteland, Four Quartets and Other Poems

  • #18
    Donald Miller
    “I think this is when most people give up on their stories. They come out of college wanting to change the world, wanting to get married, wanting to have kids and change the way people buy office supplies. But they get into the middle and discover it was harder than they thought. They can't see the distant shore anymore, and they wonder if their paddling is moving them forward. None of the trees behind them are getting smaller and none of the trees ahead are getting bigger. They take it out on their spouses, and they go looking for an easier story.”
    Donald Miller, A Million Miles in a Thousand Years: What I Learned While Editing My Life

  • #19
    Donald Miller
    “I can't do it. It would be like, say, trying to fall in love with somebody, or trying to convince yourself that your favorite food is pancakes. You don't decide those things, they just happen to you. If God is real, He needs to happen to me.”
    Donald Miller

  • #20
    Donald Miller
    “Fear isn’t only a guide to keep us safe; it’s also a manipulative emotion that can trick us into living a boring life … the great stories go to those who don’t give in to fear.”
    Donald Miller, A Million Miles in a Thousand Years: What I Learned While Editing My Life

  • #21
    We accept the love we think we deserve.
    “We accept the love we think we deserve.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #22
    Stephen Chbosky
    “And in that moment, I swear we were infinite.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #23
    Stephen Chbosky
    “There's nothing like deep breaths after laughing that hard. Nothing in the world like a sore stomach for the right reasons.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #24
    Stephen Chbosky
    “She wasn't bitter. She was sad, though. But it was a hopeful kind of sad. The kind of sad that just takes time. ”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #26
    Gail Carson Levine
    “That fool of a fairy Lucinda did not intend to lay a curse on me. She meant to bestow a gift. When I cried inconsolably through my first hour of life, my tears were her inspiration. Shaking her head sympathetically at Mother, the fairy touched my nose. "My gift is obedience. Ella will always be obedient. Now stop crying, child."
    I stopped.”
    Gail Carson Levine, Ella Enchanted

  • #27
    John Green
    “I didn’t need you, you idiot. I picked you. And then you picked me back.”
    John Green, Paper Towns

  • #28
    John Green
    “When did we see each other face-to-face? Not until you saw into my cracks and I saw into yours. Before that, we were just looking at ideas of each other, like looking at your window shade but never seeing inside. But once the vessel cracks, the light can get in. The light can get out.”
    John Green, Paper Towns

  • #29
    John Green
    “It is so hard to leave—until you leave. And then it is the easiest goddamned thing in the world.”
    John Green, Paper Towns

  • #30
    John Green
    “But there are a thousand ways to look at it: maybe the strings break, or maybe our ship s sink, or maybe we're grass--our roots so interdependent that no one is dead as long as someone is still alive. We don't suffer from a shortage of metaphors, is what I mean. But you have to be careful which metaphor you choose, because it matters.”
    John Green, Paper Towns

  • #31
    John Green
    “I always thought of it like you said, that all the strings inside him broke. But there are a thousand ways to look at it: maybe the strings break, or maybe our ships sink, or maybe we’re grass—our roots so interdependent that no one is dead as long as someone is alive. We don’t suffer from a shortage of metaphors, is what I mean. But you have to be careful which metaphor you choose, because it matters. If you choose the strings, then you’re imagining a world in which you can become irreparably broken. If you choose the grass, you’re saying that we are all infinitely interconnected, that we can use these root systems not only to understand one another but to become one another. The metaphors have implications. Do you know what I mean?”
    John Green, Paper Towns



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