Hillary > Hillary's Quotes

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  • #62
    Stephen Chbosky
    “He's a wallflower.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #63
    Stephen Chbosky
    “I think it was the first time in my life I ever felt like I looked “good”. Do you know what I mean? That nice feeling when you look in the mirror, and your hair’s right for the first time in your life? I don’t think we should base so much on weight, muscles, and a good hair day, but when it happens, it’s nice. It really is.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #64
    Stephen Chbosky
    “Lights on buildings and everything that makes you wonder.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #65
    Stephen Chbosky
    “Maybe it’s sad that these are now memories. And maybe it’s not sad.”
    Stephen Chbosky, The Perks of Being a Wallflower

  • #66
    Dr. Seuss
    “Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”
    Dr. Seuss

  • #67
    Albert Einstein
    “Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.”
    Albert Einstein

  • #68
    Mahatma Gandhi
    “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.”
    Mahatma Gandhi

  • #69
    Marcus Tullius Cicero
    “A room without books is like a body without a soul.”
    Marcus Tullius Cicero

  • #70
    Oscar Wilde
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    Oscar Wilde

  • #71
    Mae West
    “You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.”
    Mae West

  • #72
    Robert Frost
    “In three words I can sum up everything I've learned about life: it goes on.”
    Robert Frost

  • #73
    Laurie Halse Anderson
    “There is no magic cure, no making it all go away forever. There are only small steps upward; an easier day, an unexpected laugh, a mirror that doesn't matter anymore.”
    Laurie Halse Anderson, Wintergirls

  • #74
    Marya Hornbacher
    “You never come back, not all the way. Always there is an odd distance between you and the people you love and the people you meet, a barrier thin as the glass of a mirror, you never come all the way out of the mirror; you stand, for the rest of your life, with one foot in this world and no one in another, where everything is upside down and backward and sad.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #75
    Marya Hornbacher
    “There is, in fact, an incredible freedom in having nothing left to lose.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #76
    Marya Hornbacher
    “We turn skeletons into goddesses and look to them as if they might teach us how not to need.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #77
    Marya Hornbacher
    “I wanted to kill the me underneath. That fact haunted my days and nights. When you realize you hate yourself so much, when you realize that you cannot stand who you are, and this deep spite has been the motivation behind your behavior for many years, your brain can’t quite deal with it. It will try very hard to avoid that realization; it will try, in a last-ditch effort to keep your remaining parts alive, to remake the rest of you. This is, I believe, different from the suicidal wish of those who are in so much pain that death feels like relief, different from the suicide I would later attempt, trying to escape that pain. This is a wish to murder yourself; the connotation of kill is too mild. This is a belief that you deserve slow torture, violent death.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #78
    Marya Hornbacher
    “You begin to forget what it means to live. You forget things. You forget that you used to feel all right. You forget what it means to feel all right because you feel like shit all the time, and you can't remember what it was like before. People take the feeling of full for granted. They take for granted the feeling of steadiness, of hands that do not shake, heads that do not ache, throats not raw with bile and small rips of fingernails forced to haste to the gag spot. Stomachs that do not begin to wake up in the night, calves and thighs knotting in muscles that are beginning to eat away at themselves. they may or may not be awakened at night by their own inexplicable sobs.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #79
    Marya Hornbacher
    “I began to measure things in absence instead of presence.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #80
    Marya Hornbacher
    “And so I went through the looking glass, stepped into the netherworld, where up is down and food is greed, where convex mirrors cover the walls, where death is honor and flesh is weak. It is ever so easy to go. Harder to find your way back.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #81
    Marya Hornbacher
    “Never, never underestimate the power of desire. If you want to live badly enough, you can live. The great question, at least for me, was: How do I decide I want to live?”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #82
    Marya Hornbacher
    “That’s the nice thing about dreams, the way you wake up before you fall.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #83
    Marya Hornbacher
    “Hatred is so much closer to love than indifference.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #84
    Marya Hornbacher
    “It is, at the most basic level, a bundle of contradictions: a desire for power that strips you of all power. A gesture of strength that divests you of all strength.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #85
    Marya Hornbacher
    “But in some ways, the most significant choices one makes in life are done for reasons that are not all that dramatic, not earth-shaking at all; often enough, the choices we make are, for better or for worse, made by default.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #86
    Marya Hornbacher
    “There is, in the end, the letting go.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #87
    Marya Hornbacher
    “The anoretic operates under the astounding illusion that she can escape the flesh, and, by association, the realm of emotions.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #88
    Marya Hornbacher
    “The bragging was the worst. I hear this in schools all over the country, in cafés and restaurants, in bars, on the Internet, for Pete's sake, on buses, on sidewalks: Women yammering about how little they eat. Oh, I'm Starving, I haven't eaten all day, I think I'll have a great big piece of lettuce, I'm not hungry, I don't like to eat in the morning (in the afternoon, in the evening, on Tuesdays, when my nails aren't painted, when my shin hurts, when it's raining, when it's sunny, on national holidays, after or before 2 A.M.). I heard it in the hospital, that terrible ironic whine from the chapped lips of women starving to death, But I'm not hun-greeee. To hear women tell it, we're never hungry. We live on little Ms. Pac-Man power pellets. Food makes us queasy, food makes us itchy, food is too messy, all I really like to eat is celery. To hear women tell it we're ethereal beings who eat with the greatest distaste, scraping scraps of food between our teeth with our upper lips curled.

    For your edification, it's bullshit.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia

  • #89
    Laurie Halse Anderson
    “The only number that would ever be enough is 0. Zero pounds, zero life, size zero, double-zero, zero point. Zero in tennis is love. I finally get it.”
    Laurie Halse Anderson

  • #90
    Jena Morrow
    “I am forever engaged in a silent battle in my head over whether or not to lift the fork to my mouth, and when I talk myself into doing so, I taste only shame. I have an eating disorder.”
    Jena Morrow, Hollow: An Unpolished Tale

  • #91
    Marya Hornbacher
    “At a certain point, an eating disorder ceases to be "about" any one thing. It stops being about your family, or your culture. Very simply, it becomes an addiction not only emotionally but also chemically. And it becomes a crusade. If you are honest with yourself, you stop believing that anyone could "make" you do such a thing— who, your parents? They want you to starve to death? Not likely. Your environment? It couldn't careless. You are also doing it for yourself. It is a shortcut to something many women without an eating disorder have gotten: respect and power. It is a visual temper tantrum. You are making an ineffective statement about this and that, a grotesque, self-defeating mockery of cultural standards of beauty, societal misogyny. It is a blow to your parents, at whom you are pissed.
    And it is so very seductive. It is so reassuring, so all-consuming, so entertaining.
    At first.”
    Marya Hornbacher, Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia



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