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  • #1
    Jane Austen
    “I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #2
    Jane Austen
    “Till this moment I never knew myself.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #3
    Jane Austen
    “I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #4
    Jane Austen
    “I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman's inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman's fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written by men."

    "Perhaps I shall. Yes, yes, if you please, no reference to examples in books. Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #5
    Jane Austen
    “Anne hoped she had outlived the age of blushing; but the age of emotion she certainly had not.”
    Jane Austen, Persuasion

  • #6
    Dodie Smith
    “Perhaps watching someone you love suffer can teach you even more than suffering yourself can.”
    Dodie Smith, I Capture the Castle

  • #7
    Roxane Gay
    “What does it say about our culture that the desire for weight loss is considered a default feature of womanhood?”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger

  • #8
    Roxane Gay
    “There is an anxiety in being yourself, though. There is the haunting question of "What if?" always lingering. What if who I am will never be enough? What if I will never be right enough for someone?”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body
    tags: truth

  • #9
    Roxane Gay
    “As a woman, as a fat woman, I am not supposed to take up space. And yet, as a feminist, I am encouraged to believe I can take up space. I live in a contradictory space where I should try to take up space but not too much of it, and not in the wrong way, where the wrong way is any way where my body is concerned.”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger

  • #10
    Roxane Gay
    “This is a memoir of (my) body because, more often than not, stories of bodies like mine are ignored or dismissed or derided. People see bodies like mine and make their assumptions. They think they know the why of my body. They do not.”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger

  • #11
    Roxane Gay
    “The story of my life is wanting, hungering, for what I cannot have or, perhaps, wanting what I dare not allow myself to have.”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger

  • #12
    Roxane Gay
    “The bigger you are, the smaller your world becomes.”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body

  • #13
    Roxane Gay
    “Fat shaming is real, constant, and rather pointed. There are a shocking number of people who believe they can simply torment fat people into weight loss and disciplining their bodies or disappearing their bodies from the public sphere. They believe they are medical experts, listing a litany of health problems associated with fatness as personal affronts. These tormentors bind themselves in righteousness when they point out the obvious—that our bodies are unruly, defiant, fat. It’s a strange civic-minded cruelty. When people try to shame me for being fat, I feel rage. I get stubborn. I want to make myself fatter to spite the shamers, even though the only person I would really be spiting is myself.”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger

  • #14
    Roxane Gay
    “I don’t want them, or anyone, to think I am nothing more than the worst thing that has ever happened to me.”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger

  • #15
    Roxane Gay
    “I am not good at romantic interactions that aren’t furtive and kind of sleazy. I don’t know how to ask someone on a date. I don’t know how to gauge the potential interest of other human beings. I don’t know how to trust people who do express interest in me. I am not the girl who “gets the date” in these circumstances, or that’s what I cannot help but tell myself. I am always paralyzed by self-doubt and mistrust.”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger

  • #16
    Roxane Gay
    “This is the reality of living in my body: I am trapped in a cage. The frustrating thing about cages is that you’re trapped but you can see exactly what you want. You can reach out from the cage, but only so far. It”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger

  • #17
    Roxane Gay
    “I was broken and then I broke some more, and I am not yet healed but I have started believing I will be.”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body

  • #18
    Roxane Gay
    “I am not cold. I wasn’t ever cold. My warmth was hidden far away from anything that could bring hurt because I knew I didn’t have the inner scaffolding to endure any more hurt in those protected places.”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body

  • #19
    Roxane Gay
    “I know what it means to hunger without being hungry. My father believes hunger is in the mind. I know differently. I know that hunger is in the mind and the body and the heart and the soul.”
    Roxane Gay, Hunger

  • #20
    Jane Austen
    “The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love. I require so much!”
    Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

  • #21
    Jane Austen
    “I wish, as well as everybody else, to be perfectly happy; but, like everybody else, it must be in my own way.”
    Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

  • #22
    Jane Austen
    “I will be calm. I will be mistress of myself.”
    Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility

  • #23
    Eowyn Ivey
    “She had watched other women with infants and eventually understood what she craved: the boundless permission-no, the absolute necessity- to hold and kiss and stroke this tiny person. Cradling a swaddled infant in their arms, mothers would distractedly touch their lips to their babies' foreheads. Passing their toddlers in a hall, mothers would tousle their hair even sweep them up in their arms and kiss them hard along their chins and necks until the children squealed with glee. Where else in life, Mabel wondered, could a woman love so openly and with such abandon?”
    Eowyn Ivey, The Snow Child

  • #24
    Gail Honeyman
    “If someone asks you how you are, you are meant to say FINE. You are not meant to say that you cried yourself to sleep last night because you hadn't spoken to another person for two consecutive days. FINE is what you say.”
    Gail Honeyman, Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

  • #25
    Gail Honeyman
    “A philosophical question: if a tree falls in a forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? And if a woman who's wholly alone occasionally talks to a pot plant, is she certifiable? I think that it is perfectly normal to talk to oneself occasionally. It's not as though I'm expecting a reply. I'm fully aware that Polly is a houseplant.”
    Gail Honeyman, Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

  • #26
    Gail Honeyman
    “Sometimes you simply needed someone kind to sit with you while you dealt with things.”
    Gail Honeyman, Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

  • #27
    Gail Honeyman
    “Although it’s good to try new things and to keep an open mind, it’s also extremely important to stay true to who you really are.”
    Gail Honeyman, Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

  • #28
    Gail Honeyman
    “I wasn't good at pretending, that was the thing. After what had happened in that burning house, given what went on there, I could see no point in being anything other than truthful with the world. I had, literally, nothing left to lose. But, by careful observation from the sidelines, I'd worked out that social success is often built on pretending just a little. Popular people sometimes have to laugh at things they don't find very funny, or do things they don't particularly want to, with people whose company they don't particularly enjoy. Not me. I had decided, years ago, that if the choice was between that or flying solo, then I'd fly solo. It was safer that way. Grief is the price we pay for love, so they say. The price is far too high.”
    Gail Honeyman, Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

  • #29
    Gail Honeyman
    “Did men ever look in the mirror, I wondered, and find themselves wanting in deeply fundamental ways? When they opened a newspaper or watched a film, were they presented with nothing but exceptionally handsome young men, and did this make them feel intimidated, inferior, because they were not as young, not as handsome? Did they then read newspaper articles ridiculing those same handsome men if they gained weight or wore something unflattering?”
    Gail Honeyman, Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

  • #30
    Gail Honeyman
    “When you're struggling hard to manage your own emotions, it becomes unbearable to have to witness other people's, to have to try and manage theirs too.”
    Gail Honeyman, Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine



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