victoria carol > victoria's Quotes

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  • #1
    Charlotte Brontë
    “Prejudices, it is well known, are most difficult to eradicate from the heart whose soil has never been loosened or fertilised by education: they grow there, firm as weeds among stones.”
    Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

  • #2
    Sylvia Plath
    “I took a deep breath and listened to the old brag of my heart. I am, I am, I am.”
    Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar

  • #3
    Jane Austen
    “I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.”
    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice

  • #4
    George Eliot
    “O may I join the choir invisible
    Of those immortal dead who live again
    In minds made better by their presence; live
    In pulses stirred to generosity,
    In deeds of daring rectitude...”
    George Eliot, O May I Join the Choir Invisible! And Other Favourite Poems

  • #5
    George Eliot
    “It seems to me we can never give up longing and wishing while we are still alive. There are certain things we feel to be beautiful and good, and we must hunger for them.”
    George Eliot

  • #6
    George Eliot
    “It will never rain roses: when we want to have more roses, we must plant more roses.”
    George Eliot

  • #7
    George Eliot
    “If we had a keen vision and feeling of all ordinary human life, it would be like hearing the grass grow and the squirrel's heart beat, and we should die of that roar which lies on the other side of silence.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch

  • #8
    George Eliot
    “But the effect of her being on those around her was incalculably diffusive: for the growing good of the world is partly dependent on unhistoric acts; and that things are not so ill with you and me as they might have been, is half owing to the number who lived faithfully a hidden life, and rest in unvisited tombs.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch

  • #9
    George Eliot
    “There is no despair so absolute as that which comes from the first moments of our first great sorrow when we have not yet known what it is to have suffered and healed, to have despaired and recovered hope.”
    George Eliot

  • #10
    George Eliot
    “The responsibility of tolerance lies in those who have the wider vision.”
    George Eliot

  • #11
    George Eliot
    “To be a poet is to have a soul so quick to discern, that no shade of quality escapes it, and so quick to feel, that discernment is but a hand playing with finely-ordered variety on the chords of emotion--a soul in which knowledge passes instantaneously into feeling, and feeling flashes back as a new organ of knowledge.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch

  • #12
    George Eliot
    “Since you think it my duty, Mr. Farebrother, I will tell you that I have too strong a feeling for Fred to give him up for any one else. I should never be quite happy if I thought he was unhappy for the loss of me. It has taken such deep root in me—my gratitude to him for always loving me best, and minding so much if I hurt myself, from the time when we were very little. I cannot imagine any new feeling coming to make that weaker.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch

  • #13
    George Eliot
    “Certainly the determining acts of her life were not ideally beautiful. They were the mixed result of young and novel impulse struggling amidst the conditions of an imperfect social state, in which great feelings will often take the aspect of error, and great faith the aspect of illusion.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch
    tags: soul

  • #14
    George Eliot
    “Poetry and art and knowledge are sacred and pure.”
    George Eliot, The Mill on the Floss

  • #15
    George Eliot
    “what we call our despair is often only the painful eagerness of unfed hope.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch
    tags: hope

  • #16
    George Eliot
    “I flutter all ways, and fly in none.”
    George Eliot

  • #17
    George Eliot
    “It is never too late to be what you might have been.”
    George Eliot

  • #18
    George Eliot
    “What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult for each other?”
    George Eliot

  • #19
    George Eliot
    “It is always fatal to have music or poetry interrupted.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch

  • #20
    George Eliot
    “And certainly, the mistakes that we male and female mortals make when we have our own way might fairly raise some wonder that we are so fond of it.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch

  • #21
    George Eliot
    “What greater thing is there for two human souls, than to feel that they are joined for life--to strengthen each other in all labor, to rest on each other in all sorrow, to minister to each other in all pain, to be one with each other in silent unspeakable memories at the moment of the last parting?”
    George Eliot, Adam Bede

  • #22
    George Eliot
    “Blessed is the man who, having nothing to say, abstains from giving us wordy evidence of the fact.”
    George Eliot, Impressions of Theophrastus Such

  • #23
    George Eliot
    “Keep true. Never be ashamed of doing right. Decide what you think is right and stick to it.”
    George Eliot

  • #24
    George Eliot
    “Hold up your head! You were not made for failure, you were made for victory. Go forward with a joyful confidence.”
    George Eliot

  • #25
    George Eliot
    “We mortals, men and women, devour many a disappointment between breakfast and dinner-time; keep back the tears and look a little pale about the lips, and in answer to inquiries say, "Oh, nothing!" Pride helps; and pride is not a bad thing when it only urges us to hide our hurts— not to hurt others.”
    George Eliot, Middlemarch

  • #26
    George Eliot
    “It is surely better to pardon too much, than to condemn too much.”
    George Eliot

  • #27
    George Eliot
    “I am not imposed upon by fine words; I can see what actions mean.”
    George Eliot, The Mill on the Floss

  • #28
    George Eliot
    “Animals are such agreeable friends―they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms.”
    George Eliot, Mr Gilfil's Love Story

  • #29
    George Eliot
    “I desire no future that will break the ties of the past.”
    George Eliot, The Mill on the Floss

  • #30
    George Eliot
    “There is no feeling, except the extremes of fear and grief, that does not find relief in music.”
    George Eliot



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